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Canadian, International Military and Internal Affairs News => Defence Watch => Topic started by: CVA_Posting on April 03, 2012, 11:04:31 PM

Title: Canadians in Afghanistan and In NORAD the Focus of Two New Books
Post by: CVA_Posting on April 03, 2012, 11:04:31 PM
Canadians in Afghanistan and In NORAD the Focus of Two New Books

Defence Watch has received a couple of new books about Canadians and military operations.


First there is NORAD and the Soviet Nuclear Threat ? Canada?s Secret Electronic Air War.


Here are the details from the publisher Dundurn:


NORAD and the …


Source: Canadians in Afghanistan and In NORAD the Focus of Two New Books (http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/2012/04/01/canadians-in-afghanistan-and-in-norad-the-focus-of-two-new-books/)


Defence Watch has received a couple of new books about Canadians and military operations.

First there is NORAD and the Soviet Nuclear Threat – Canada’s Secret Electronic Air War.

Here are the details from the publisher Dundurn:

NORAD and the Soviet Nuclear Threat is the history of the air defence of Canada during the Cold War era. The reader is taken into the Top Secret world of NORAD, the joint Canadian-American North American Air Defence network. Ride along with the aircrew in their cockpit as they fight an electronic joust in the skies. Go deep underground to the Command Centre as the Air Weapons controllers plot the air war on their radar screens. Visit the radar sites deep in the Canadian bush as they struggle to provide the radar data for an electronic air battle happening overhead.

An actual NORAD exercise on 10 May 1973, called Amalgam Mute, is used as an example. This exercise tested that NORAD was honouring its motto: Deter, Detect, Destroy, and was protecting North America from aerial threat. There is an extensive explanation of the aircraft, squadrons, weapons, radar, and radar sites involved.

Included are two personal accounts of the first interception of a Soviet “Bear” bomber off the coast of Canada, and the first Canadian fighter interceptor pilot to win the coveted United States Air Force “Top Gun” award.

(http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fpostmediaottawacitizen.files.wordpress.com%2F2012%2F04%2F9781445602639.jpg&hash=83e97349a1f0b97c02565db11bbff5ba)

About the Author

Gordon A.A. Wilson immigrated to Canada in 1965 to take the aeronautical engineering course. Deciding to “fly ‘em rather than build ‘em,” he joined the Canadian Forces in 1968 as a pilot. He flew a tour with 414 Electronic Warfare Squadron to exercise and test the systems of the North American Air (now Aerospace) Defense Command (NORAD). Wilson lives near Vancouver.

The cover price on the book is $28.99.

There is  is a book about Canada and the Afghan war – No Easy Task: Fighting in Afghanistan. It is edited by Col. Bernd Horn and Dr. Emily Spencer. The cover price is $35.00.

The publisher, Dundurn, bills it as a collection of essays that explores the historical and contemporary complexities of conflict and war in Afghanistan from a Canadian perspective.

Here are some more details:

Afghanistan has long been considered the graveyard of empires. Throughout their history, Afghans have endured the ravages of foreign invaders, from marauding hordes and imperial armies to global superpowers, while demonstrating a fierce independence and strong resistance to outside occupiers. Those who have ventured into Afghanistan with notions of controlling its people have soon discovered that fighting in that rugged, hostile land is no easy task. Afghans have proven to be tenacious and unrelenting foes.

(http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fpostmediaottawacitizen.files.wordpress.com%2F2012%2F04%2F9781459701632_cover_coverbookpage.jpg&hash=b2fcb1706bcb486dbe8e388c8368b6eb)

No Easy Task examines this legacy of conflict, particularly from a Canadian perspective. What emerges is the difficulty faced by foreign forces attempting to impose their will over Afghans who, for their part, have consistently adapted tactics and strategies to stymie and defeat those they perceive as invaders and interlopers. It is within this complexity and challenge that the difficult counter-insurgency must be fought.