Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - One Veteran One Standard

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 522
31
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

32
Dining Out: Eldon's in the Glebe delivers tasty dishes in comfy space

The two-month-old restaurant on Bank Street stresses local ingredients, from-scratch cooking and minimal food waste.

Eldon’s

775 Bank St., 613-565-0101, eldons.ca

Open: Tuesday to Saturday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., 5 to 10 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; closed Monday

Prices: Brunch items $8 to $16, mains $16 to $26 at dinner

Access: small ramp to front door


When we go out to eat, we take for granted that the restaurant’s goal should be to give us, in exchange for our hard-earned money, some very tasty food, perhaps an enjoyable beverage or two, and, overall, a memorable experience.


At Eldon’s, which opened in the Glebe, two months ago, there’s a mission statement posted near its entrance that describes an additional objective.


“We strive to be part of the agricultural community and give back to the farmers that provide for us,” reads the message on the chalkboard. “At Eldon’s, our food waste is put aside and sent back to the farms and serves as an organic food for the animals.”


So, just a few steps in, this narrow, homey eatery announces both its farm-to-table bona fides and its green conscientiousness. If stars were awarded, an extra one should go to recognize Eldon’s virtue. Happily, the easy-going eatery of about 24 seats also delivered tasty food and enjoyable beverages during my three recent and pleasantly recalled visits.


Eldon’s is owned jointly by 32-year-old chef Cory Baird, an Ottawa native, and 26-year-old Marhlee Gaudet, who oversees its books and dining room and has personably dispensed useful information about food and wine while serving. The couple, a team in business and life, met in Toronto, where Baird was cooking in restaurant kitchens and playing in the new wave electro-hip hop group Dream Jefferson.


Shunting music to the side, Baird, who never went to cooking school, returned with Gaudet to Ottawa last spring to open Eldon’s, which replaces a Bank Street burrito place with something more distinctive.


While the vibe of Eldon’s is casual and unassuming, with white brick and concrete walls adorned with mirrors and rustic touches and an open kitchen in the back, it clearly feels like a personalized space. Indeed, Baird told me this week that Eldon’s is named after his grandfather. While serving me last weekend, Gaudet mentioned that the charming teacup-and-saucer combo on our table had been in her family.


Relying on local producers such as Acorn Creek Garden Farm, Juniper Farm, Peabody Farm and Ferme Rêveuse, plus further-afield purveyors including pork producer Gaspor north of Montreal and Pilot Coffee Roasters in Toronto, Baird has drawn up tautly contained but appealing brunch and dinner menus that feature fresh and simple from-scratch dishes.


At lunch and brunch I’ve enjoyed plates in which clean-flavoured and succulent smoked trout and pulled pork were stars, either in sandwiches or paired with brightly dressed greens and fine roasted potatoes and poached eggs. Open-faced sandwiches of roasted vegetables and heirloom tomatoes felt well-composed and complete and pleased the meat abstainers at our table. A French lentil salad melded its herbal and celery notes nicely.


Smoked trout with potatoes and salad at Eldon’s


Pulled pork sandwich at Eldon’s


Lenti salad at Eldon’s


Roasted vegetable sandwich at Eldon’s


Plates at dinner saw quality ingredients presented honestly and with minimal manipulation or distracting accoutrements so that their inherent flavours shone.


The Enright Cattle butcher’s steak ($22) — typically a piece of flatiron, skirt or flank steak, Baird told me this week — and the Gaspor pork “striploin” ($26) — meat taken from the small, milk-fed pig’s loin, but closer to the butt — prioritized forthright flavour and meatiness over tenderness.


Butchers steak at Eldon’s


Pork striploin at Eldon’s


Some at our table objected to extra chewing, but I supported Baird’s priorities and those lesser-known cuts of meat. Both dishes included thoughtfully chosen sides to balance the meats. With the beef came a sauce of roasted red peppers and a blanket of garlic scapes. The pork was offset very well by a white bean purée for starchiness, peaches for sweetness and charred radicchio for bitterness.


Chicken and dumplings ($18) was as comforting as it needed to be, although my bite of a friend’s dumpling did not wow. More impressive, I thought, was a plate of simply crusted and cooked pieces of Lake Erie pickerel ($24), in which the fish played very nicely with creamed corn, Swiss chard and cherry tomatoes.


Chicken and dumplings at Eldon’s


Pickerel with corn, cherry tomatoes and Swiss chard


None of these plates was all that massive. If you seek to get stuffed while dining out, then an all-you-can-eat buffet will suit you better than Eldon’s. But there is something about the avoidance of gluttony — and of super-sized pricing — that’s in line with Eldon’s admirable ethos.


Desserts included fresh berries ($5) with some of the simple farmers cheese — but sweetened — that figures on many a dish, and an OK bowl of poached peach with almond crumble ($7), plus pastries from Ottawa’s Art Is In Bakery.


Berries and cream at Eldon’s


Poached peaches at Eldon’s


What improvements at Eldon’s could I suggest? Perhaps a little more consistency, given that potatoes that were perfect at one mid-day meal were over-cooked at another, or that some dishes, while likeable and interesting, seemed just a touch under-seasoned while those over-cooked potatoes were too heavily salted.


But, I’m talking about a few grains of salt here and there. I should grouse more loudly that Eldon’s hard metal chairs could use some cushions if you want to sit a spell and enjoy the surroundings, which is something that comes entirely naturally here.


phum@postmedia.com

twitter.com/peterhum

Peter Hum’s restaurant reviews


Source: Dining Out: Eldon's in the Glebe delivers tasty dishes in comfy space

33
Search continues for 11-year-old Ottawa boy after boat capsizes on the St. Lawrence

Rescue workers were searching for an 11-year-old Ottawa boy who didn’t resurface after he and four others were thrown into the St. Lawrence River after a boat capsized on Saturday afternoon. The Leeds County OPP said in a news release they responded to a report of a possible drowning on the river, west of Rockport, at […]

Rescue workers were searching for an 11-year-old Ottawa boy who didn’t resurface after he and four others were thrown into the St. Lawrence River after a boat capsized on Saturday afternoon.


The Leeds County OPP said in a news release they responded to a report of a possible drowning on the river, west of Rockport, at about 4 p.m.


Four of those who went into the water were rescued, but the boy, who had been vacationing with his family, could not be found.


Besides the OPP, the Rescue Coordination Centre at CFB Trenton, the Canadian Coast Guard and the Leeds and Thousand Islands Fire Department all responded to the call.


Hunter Grant, the former publisher of The Recorder and Times and a Rockport area resident, posted on Facebook that the search effort launched from his dock.


Despite their combined efforts, they were unable to locate the boy.


“OPP just left our place,” Grant posted around 10 p.m. “They were trying to determine where the submerged boat is with their flashlights, but it’s too far upstream and it’s too dark.”


In an email Sunday morning, Grant said the search operation was extensive.


“Yesterday’s accident resulted in an exceptional operation, with every responder imaginable on site: OPP, both water and land; RCMP, Coast Guard, volunteer fire department, ambulance,” wrote Grant.


“The divers had no tanks, so they were parachuted in about 100 yards off the end of our dock, in a canister. The (Hercules aircraft) from Trenton just happened to be in the area, which was providential, and I think the divers were hoping the boy was in the boat somewhere, but that did not appear to be the case.”


Grant added there is a “back eddy that heads upriver” past his home, and the capsized boat moved in that direction after it was near the bottom.


“The divers attached a heavy rope to the boat, and then to a cleat on the southwest end of our dock.”



Grant added salvage operations were to begin Sunday afternoon, with Ken Kehoe, of Kehoe Marine Construction, doing the work.


Police said that alcohol was not a factor in the incident.



The scene on shore as the search continues for an 11-year-old Ottawa boy who was thrown from a boat in the Saint Lawrence River on Saturday, September 1, 2018
Ashley Fraser


 


With files from the Brockville Recorder & Times


Source: Search continues for 11-year-old Ottawa boy after boat capsizes on the St. Lawrence

34
OPP launch probe, Ottawa councillor Tim Tierney recuses himself from Ottawa Police Services board

The OPP anti-rackets branch is investigating a municipal elections complaint as an incumbent Ottawa councillor recuses himself from his duties as an Ottawa Police Services board member. At the centre of the investigation is a phone conversation between Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney and challenger Michael Schurter in the minutes leading up to the cutoff […]

The OPP anti-rackets branch is investigating a municipal elections complaint as an incumbent Ottawa councillor recuses himself from his duties as an Ottawa Police Services board member.


At the centre of the investigation is a phone conversation between Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney and challenger Michael Schurter in the minutes leading up to the cutoff time for election nominations.


“On July 27, 2018, minutes before the 2 p.m. withdrawal deadline for city council elections, I was called by a mutual friend and connected to Tim Tierney,” Schurter said Friday in an emailed response to questions from this newspaper.


“Based on Tim’s conduct during that call I filed a report to the authorities. I have recently come to understand that the city has also filed a complaint based on Tim’s actions during that same call. Since this matter is currently being investigated by the OPP, I have no further comments at this time.”


People with knowledge of the phone conversation claim Tierney offered to make a large donation to the food bank if Schurter didn’t register to run in Beacon Hill-Cyrville.


“I have done absolutely nothing wrong. I’m 100 per cent confident this soon will be established,” Tierney said in an emailed response to a request for comment. “I remain committed to serving the people of Beacon Hill-Cyrville to the fullest.”


The complaint first landed in the hands of the Ottawa Police Service.


Chief Charles Bordeleau said the police force received the complaint and he discussed the matter with the chair of the police services board. They agreed that because there might be a potential conflict of interest, the complaint should be referred to the OPP, Bordeleau said.


Charles Bordeleau.


Bordeleau, who noted that the city clerk has also been notified about the matter, declined to say when Ottawa police received the complaint.


City clerk and solicitor Rick O’Connor said, “I can neither confirm nor deny that there’s any sort of investigation or review going on.”


Staff Sgt. Carolle Dionne, the OPP’s provincial media relations co-ordinator, confirmed that Bordeleau requested the OPP’s assistance but declined to provide further details about the investigation.


“Members of our anti-rackets branch are currently investigating the matter involving the municipal elections,” Dionne said in an email. “As this investigation is still in the preliminary stages, we can’t speak to the specifics at this time.”


Tierney is one of three councillors on the police services board.


Coun. Eli El-Chantiry, chair of the police services board, said Tierney has asked if he can be recused from police board activities pending the outcome of an investigation.


“Without knowing what’s happening, the board wants to fully co-operate and the board feels it doesn’t want to interfere with the investigation,” El-Chantiry said, emphasizing that he doesn’t know anything about the allegations leading to the OPP probe.


According to El-Chantiry, Tierney’s recusal means he won’t be able to participate in police board meetings or police board committees during the investigation.


It looked like Tierney would be uncontested in Beacon Hill-Cyrville ward up until July 27, which was the last day for candidates to file their nomination papers to run in the municipal election. As the clock approached the filing deadline, Schurter arrived at the elections office on Cyrville Road to register as a candidate in Beacon Hill-Cyrville. He went into a room to finalize his nomination with election staff, and at one point the door to the room closed.


When Schurter spoke with reporters after he left the room, he said the incumbent councillor shouldn’t go unchallenged in the election. Tierney was the only incumbent councillor who didn’t have a registered challenger going into the last day for nominations.


“At the end of the day, you have to compete for a job like this,” Schurter said that day, and he later wrote on his campaign website, “Monopolies are bad for business; acclaimed incumbents are bad for democracy.”


Reevely: Tierney should have seen danger if allegation true


Justin McAuley, one of Schurter’s supporters, confirmed he was in the room at Elections Ottawa when Schurter took a call from Tierney but would go no further.


“Unfortunately, because I’m a witness to the police investigation, I’m going to have to decline to comment,” McAuley said.


Schurter and Tierney are the only candidates in Beacon Hill-Cyrville.


Tierney was first elected to council in 2010 and won re-election in 2014.


The election is Oct. 22.


jwilling@postmedia.com


twitter.com/JonathanWilling


dreevely@postmedia.com


twitter.com/dreevely


Source: OPP launch probe, Ottawa councillor Tim Tierney recuses himself from Ottawa Police Services board

35
Defence Watch / Quinte West man dies of injuries sustained in fire
« on: August 30, 2018, 07:09:40 AM »
Quinte West man dies of injuries sustained in fire

A 24-year-old man has died after being injured in a Trenton fire last week. Quinte West OPP said on Wednesday that Raven Dagnall died Sunday in hospital as a result of injuries sustained in the fire Aug. 23. Dagnall had been pulled by firefighters from the house fire last Thursday and was airlifted to Sunnybrook […]

A 24-year-old man has died after being injured in a Trenton fire last week.


Quinte West OPP said on Wednesday that Raven Dagnall died Sunday in hospital as a result of injuries sustained in the fire Aug. 23.


Dagnall had been pulled by firefighters from the house fire last Thursday and was airlifted to Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto.


Firefighters said they had to knock down the front door of an apartment inside an older house to remove Dagnall.


Firefighters and the OPP continue to investigate to determine the cause of the fire.


 


Source: Quinte West man dies of injuries sustained in fire

36
They showed her the money: Victim flips tables on bad door-to-door sale

Carol Baas never thought she’d see a red cent, but there it was, via courier: a $750 cheque awarded after a small claims court victory over a door-to-door sales company. Baas, 57, a retired public servant, was upset at herself for signing up for a water softener she didn’t need, at $59 a month for […]

Carol Baas never thought she’d see a red cent, but there it was, via courier: a $750 cheque awarded after a small claims court victory over a door-to-door sales company.


Baas, 57, a retired public servant, was upset at herself for signing up for a water softener she didn’t need, at $59 a month for 10 years, after a door-knock pitch in February 2017 from Ontario Safety Standards, based in Toronto.


Only 41 days later, even before her first bill arrived, Baas discovered a lien had been slapped on her east-end property for any unpaid fees, in excess of $8,000 over the life of the contract.


Once she realized the device wasn’t needed — Ottawa already has soft municipal water — she immediately went to work to cancel the contract. She first notified Enbridge, which is required by law to engage in third-party billing. She only paid $79 in rental fees before the billing stopped.


Then she took the matter to small claims court, working the system without a lawyer. She won her case on June 22.


“I am satisfied that the defendant, Ontario Safety Standards, is in breach of its obligations under the Consumer Protection Act and, as a result, the contract is of no force or effect,” wrote Deputy Judge Hank Witteveen.


He also awarded her $750. “Never,” she said, when asked if she thought she would ever see the money. “Not in a million years.”


But last week a cheque showed up, which she immediately cashed.


Baas’s case was instructive. Like many consumers who have complained to this newspaper, she discovered there were two other corporate entities involved with Ontario Safety, which explained the different name on the Enbridge bill. So she named them all as defendants.


With the court judgment, Baas also managed to get the lien removed.


She has also been trying to help other consumers stuck with long-term, unwanted contracts. She encourages others to act quickly, be patient, keep good records and be aware that small claims court is user-friendly for a lay person. “Don’t be afraid.”


There was a twist at the end, she noted. The cheque came from Canadian Safety Standards in an enveloped marked “Ontario Safety Standards.”


“I’d just like to let other victims know that if they choose to go the route that I did, perhaps there could be some justice for them, too.”


Dozens of local residents have contacted this newspaper with stories of long-term contracts signed at the door for products such as water softeners or air cleaners.


The problem has been so widespread, for so long, the Ontario government in March amended Bill 59 to ban the door-to-door sales of a whole basket of household items: air cleaners, air conditioners, air purifiers, duct cleaning services, furnaces, water filters, water heaters, water purifiers, water softeners, water-treatment devices and any combination thereof.


Before the ban was instituted, the provincial consumer ministry was bombarded with complaints and inquiries about door-to-door sales tactics, in excess of 2,400 in 2016.


To contact Kelly Egan, please call 613-726-5896 or email kegan@postmedia.com


Twitter.com/kellyegancolumn


Source: They showed her the money: Victim flips tables on bad door-to-door sale

37
Defence Watch / Enjoy the sun on Saturday, showers possible on Sunday
« on: August 26, 2018, 02:02:00 AM »
Enjoy the sun on Saturday, showers possible on Sunday

It’ll be another nice one out there today, as summer starts to wind down. Short and sweet: Environment Canada is predicting a  mix of sun and cloud with a high of 27 C.  The humidex will feel like a reasonable 31 and the UV index should be 7 or high. Tonight should be mainly cloudy. […]

It’ll be another nice one out there today, as summer starts to wind down.


Short and sweet: Environment Canada is predicting a  mix of sun and cloud with a high of 27 C.  The humidex will feel like a reasonable 31 and the UV index should be 7 or high.


Tonight should be mainly cloudy. There’s a 60 per cent chance of showers overnight with risk of a thunderstorm, and a low of 18 C.


Winds will be light at 10 km/hour, from the southeast in the morning and shifting to southerly later in the day


Sunday looks like it will be mainly cloudy with 60 per cent chance of showers and risk of a thunderstorm. A  high of 26 C is predicted with a  humidex of 32.


If you feel like cooling down at a local beach, you can check for closures and water quality here.


And if you’re driving downtown today, here are some road closures to watch out for, due to the Pride festival.


Source: Enjoy the sun on Saturday, showers possible on Sunday

38
Defence Watch / Downtown road closures for Pride events this weekend
« on: August 23, 2018, 11:01:52 PM »
Downtown road closures for Pride events this weekend

A reminder to Ottawa residents: We’re feeling the pride this weekend. The City of Ottawa reminds motorists that the Bank Street Fair and Capital Pride Parade on Saturday and Sunday will mean the following road closures from Saturday at 7 a.m. to Sunday at 11 p.m. Somerset Street, between Bank Street and O’Connor Street, and; […]

A reminder to Ottawa residents: We’re feeling the pride this weekend.


The City of Ottawa reminds motorists that the Bank Street Fair and Capital Pride Parade on Saturday and Sunday will mean the following road closures from Saturday at 7 a.m. to Sunday at 11 p.m.



  • Somerset Street, between Bank Street and O’Connor Street, and;

  • Bank Street between Somerset Street and Gladstone Avenue.


Source: Downtown road closures for Pride events this weekend

39
The Amazon effect: Will Ottawa's new fulfillment centre create 'middle class' jobs?

Do you have what it takes to get — and keep — a job as a “warehouse associate” with Amazon? Clearing the initial bar to gain bottom-rung employment with the e-commerce giant isn’t that high. You have to be a high school graduate 18 or older. But it takes more than that. You must be […]

Do you have what it takes to get — and keep — a job as a “warehouse associate” with Amazon?


Clearing the initial bar to gain bottom-rung employment with the e-commerce giant isn’t that high. You have to be a high school graduate 18 or older.


But it takes more than that.


You must be able to handle packages of up to 49 pounds. You must be willing to move large quantities of merchandise for a 10- to 12-hour day. You may be asked to “stow” or “pick” from racks up to 45 feet high — taller than a four-storey building. You will often have to push, pull, squat and bend. Your productivity will be constantly monitored.


Related



The starting pay? $14.40 an hour — Ontario minimum wage is $14 — plus 50 cents more an hour for the night shift, according to a job ad for an Amazon “fulfillment centre” in Brampton.


“Working at Amazon has to have been one of the worst experiences of my life,” wrote one Brampton warehouse worker on the workplace website Glassdoor, where workers post anonymous reviews. “If I could describe working at Amazon in one word, it would be fear. Fear of going to the bathroom, fear of walking around on your break, fear of doing your job even.


The amount of pressure and strain your body will take for standing 10 hours straight everyday will be the first reason as to why anyone would leave … Please be warned that working at Amazon is not for everyone and that they will chew you up and spit you out because they know how expendable you are.”


The ground-breaking ceremony for Ottawa’s one-million-square-foot Amazon fulfillment centre in Carlsbad Springs is scheduled to be held Monday. The warehouse will create more than 600 full-time jobs, according to Amazon spokeswoman Alyssa Tran, who added the jobs will provide competitive wages and comprehensive benefits “starting on Day 1.” The company also provides a group RRSP, offers performance-based bonuses and pays up to 95 per cent tuition for workers studying for “in-demand” jobs in areas such as accounting, IT and paramedic services.


The company will be looking not only for warehouse workers, but also for operations managers and workers for information technology roles, said Tran. According to Amazon, the company has already created more than 7,000 full-time jobs in Canada.


Location at 5371 Boundary Road, in the rural east end of Ottawa, where Amazon will be constructing a massive fulfillment centre.


Negative stories about working conditions for warehouse employees and a “churn and burn” company culture have been following Amazon like a dark cloud for years. Workers say the pressure to perform faster and better is unrelenting, and the workforce is culled constantly. Wrote one worker at the Milton warehouse on Glassdoor: “You will have to walk as much as 15 kilometres a day (in 10 hours). Your feet and various other parts of your body will hurt like nothing you have experienced before.”


Tran said workers receive comprehensive training and learn about the expectations for their roles. In any job, there are expectations, she said. “We continue to see good interest.”


As Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais sees it, Amazon’s arrival in his ward is reason to celebrate. Amazon will be the largest employer in the east end. It will create not only manual labour jobs, but also employment for managers and administrators. There will be economic spin-offs for the entire region, and the warehouse will kick-start growth in the industrial park.


The jobs generated by Amazon will be, statistically, middle-class jobs, he said. According to Statistics Canada, the national median household income was just over $70,000 in 2015.


“I think there’s a lack of understanding about what middle-class means. If you look at the Statistics Canada definition, that would be the case,” he said. “As I understand it, if you work at this kind of a centre, and you’re part of a couple, it would put you in the realm of the national average.”


Others are asking if the kinds of jobs Amazon will bring are worth celebrating.


“There are good jobs and there are bad jobs. Amazon is known for creating really bad jobs,” says Ricardo Tranjan, a senior researcher with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.


Ottawa’s fulfillment centre will produce two kinds of jobs. During the construction process, the warehouse will create jobs that will allow apprentices to gain skills and move on to other jobs. That’s good, said Tranjan. But for the people who will work in the warehouse? He has reservations.


Amazon is aggressively anti-union and has one of the highest turnover rates of any Fortune 500 company, said Tranjan.


He points to a study published in April in The New Food Economy, a non-profit publication, that found large numbers of U.S. Amazon employees enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as “food stamps.” In Ohio, around one in 10 Amazon employees uses food stamps. In Pennsylvania, about one in nine, according to the study. In Arizona, almost one in three were enrolled in the program, which provides food-purchasing assistance to low-income people.


“Are they bringing low-paid, back-breaking jobs that squeeze employees for as long as they can stand? Yes, we are excited to have new jobs. But not all jobs are the same,” Tranjan said.


Staff at the Amazon Swansea fulfilment centre process orders as they prepare their busiest time of the year on November 24, 2011 in Swansea, Wales.


Certainly, any time there is a construction project of this magnitude, there are jobs both on and off the site, says Sean McKenny, president of the Ottawa and District Labour Council.


“Is it good story? Absolutely it is. But there are conflicting stories about who will be working at the fulfillment centre,” he said. “Time will tell. We have concerns. It’s great if people are paid a fair wage. We’ll be watching and paying close attention.”


In any industry, you’ll hear a lot of the negative but the positive doesn’t get repeated, said Blais. “While there are many critics, many of those are at the highest level of the ivory tower. People have to work.”


Amazon’s business culture is built on the idea that every process can be improved to keep customers happy, and every employee has a hand in this grand enterprise. But questions have been raised about the price workers pay.


“This is the irony of work in an Amazon fulfillment centre: the end result of doing your job consistently well today is that customers will expect that tomorrow Amazon will do it faster and better,” noted Wired magazine.


In this Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2017, photo, a clerk reaches to pick an item for a customer order at the Amazon Prime warehouse, in New York.


According to a 2011 newspaper report from Allentown, Pennsylvania, 15 out of 1,600 workers in its Lehigh Valley warehouse collapsed after the heat index reached 102 degrees (over 38 C). Workers who were sent home because of the heat received disciplinary points, some employees told The Morning Call. An email response to the newspaper attributed to Vickie Mortimer, general manager at the warehouse, said the safety and welfare of employees is the company’s top priority.


“We go to great lengths to ensure a safe work environment, with activities that include free water, snacks, extra fans and cooled air during the summer. I am grateful to work with such a fantastic group of employees from our community, and we partner with them every day to make sure our facility is a great place to work.”


This report was from seven years ago, said Tran. “Our fulfillment centres are built with climate control. In 2012, we invested $52 million to retrofit all our existing fulfillment centers with air conditioning.”


Even Amazon’s white-collar culture has been in the line of fire. In a scorching 2015 investigative piece, The New York Times said Amazon was “conducting a little-known experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers, redrawing the boundaries of what is acceptable.”


Amazon top recruiter Susan Harker, said the company strives to do big, innovative, groundbreaking things, and those things aren’t easy. “When you’re shooting for the moon, the nature of the work is really challenging. For some people, it doesn’t work.”


“The article doesn’t describe the Amazon I know or the caring Amazonians I work with every day,” wrote CEO Jeff Bezos in an email to workers after the article was published. “But if you know of any stories like those reported, I want you to escalate to HR. You can also email me directly at jeff@amazon.com. Even if it’s rare or isolated, our tolerance for any such lack of empathy needs to be zero.”


Still, the criticism has not let up.


In Britain, investigative journalist James Bloodworth, author of Hired: Six Months Undercover in Low-Wage Britain, reported finding a bottle of urine on a shelf while he was working undercover in an Amazon warehouse. Why would workers pee in bottles? Because the washrooms are too far away and workers don’t want to take time away from work to meet productivity targets, he explained.


“It’s the most oppressive place I had ever worked, easily,” Bloodworth said in an interview earlier this year.


Trans said the washroom issue is untrue. “Associates are allowed to use the toilet whenever needed and Amazon ensures all of its associates have easy access to toilet facilities which are just a short walk where they are working,” she said.


There have even been questions about whether fulfillment centres actually generate jobs.


In February, the Washington-based Economic Policy Institute released a report based on data of 1,161 U.S. counties with warehousing facilities from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Of these, 69 were Amazon fulfillment centres in 445 counties between 2001 and 2015.


The report concluded that when Amazon opens a new fulfillment centre, it gains about 30 per cent more warehousing and storage jobs, but no new net jobs. The report suggests there’s a kind of “job displacement” taking place, or that growth in warehousing jobs is not spilling into broader employment gains.


“We find that opening an Amazon fulfillment centre does lead to gains in warehouse jobs in a county, but does not lead to gains in overall county-level employment. These findings are consistent with theories arguing that luring establishments from existing national employers to a particular locale may just displace incumbent jobs.”


Amazon disagrees.


“The study looks at a window of 2001 to 2015, which is misleading as it includes the time in which communities struggled during the recession and when Amazon was not building out its network of fulfillment centres as it is today. If you look at more current information, you will see that these data points are not demonstrative of our current network, community impact, and both the direct and indirect job creation near fulfillment centres,” Tran said in an emailed statement on Tuesday.


The study also found state and local governments give away millions in tax abatements, credits and exemptions to lure Amazon warehouses to their jurisdictions but don’t get a corresponding return on their investment.


Ottawa councillor for Orleans Ward Bob Monette, Mayor Jim Watson, Cumberland Ward councillor Stephen Blais, and Beacon Hill-Cyrville Ward councillor Tim Tierney pose for photos after officially announcing that Amazon will be building a large fulfillment centre in the east end of the city. July 10, 2018.


In 2017, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson set out to woo Amazon after it announced it was looking for a second North American headquarters. Although Ottawa never made the shortlist, news that a behemoth warehouse was coming to the city was confirmed this spring. The city agreed to let Amazon’s landlord, Broccolini, defer $8,034,164 in municipal development charge payments until the warehouse is built.


The Economic Policy Institute researchers urged local governments to invest in public services such as childhood education and infrastructure “that are proven to spur long-term economic development” instead of spending public resources on a supposedly ineffective strategy.


“Instead of committing to giving away public funds to attract existing employers from other regions in a zero-sum contest, communities should demand concrete actions that ensure that an employer’s arrival will make their region a more prosperous place—or that at least offset some of the harms the arrival could create.”


The Amazon workplace ethos has fans who offset the detractors. Some workers have described working for the company as fast-paced, challenging and invigorating. Warehouse employees get medical benefits and overtime pay after 40 hours a week. (For most jobs, overtime is payable after 44 hours of work in a week, according to the Ontario Employment Standards Act.) One Glassdoor contributor reported learning many things about shipping and receiving and how huge companies get orders out on time. “Its (sic) a non stop learning environment.”


Added another worker from the Milton plant: “An ideal place to start your career life.”


In Ontario, the company’s health and safety record with the Ministry of Labour has been fairly solid. Inspectors made 18 field visits to three Amazon fulfillment centres between July 1, 2015 and July 11, 2018 for health and safety checks, according to ministry records. Out of these visits, there were 10 orders issued, including two ordering that the company ensure items can’t tip or fall — a rather modest number of orders given the size of the facilities in Brampton, Mississauga and Milton. Most of the cases have been closed.


The Ontario Employment Standards Act governs working conditions such as hours of work, rest, meal breaks and overtime, but the act is silent on the issues of what would be a reasonable level of productivity to expect of workers, and what would exceed that limit.


Employees pack items before dispatching them in the huge Amazon ‘fulfilment centre’ warehouse on November 28, 2013 in Peterborough, England.


What does the arrival of Amazon mean for Ottawa’s job scene? Alan Arcand, associate director of the Centre for Municipal Studies at the Conference Board of Canada, said Ottawa-Gatineau already has a low employment rate. Some of the fulfillment centre workers will likely come from outside the region. These jobs will not necessarily be minimum-wage jobs, he adds.


Arcand doesn’t believe the fulfillment centre will do much to change the complexion of the workforce in Ottawa. “There are 745,000 people working in Ottawa-Gatineau. Another 600 jobs adds up to less than .1 per cent.”


Workers, labour leaders, the city and the province will have to remain vigilant about working conditions, says Tranjan.


“Kudos for the city. But the hard part starts now. We have a lot of work ahead of us to make sure they’re good jobs,” he said.


“The city brought these jobs here. They made a big deal of it. Now they’re also on the hook to make sure employees benefit from it.”


Amazon and other businesses that provide on-demand services, such as Walmart, should be scrutinized over working conditions, wages and their surveillance of workers, said Claire Mummé, a professor of employment and labour law at the University of Windsor. Society has to think about the true cost of convenience, she said.


“I like getting same-day packages. It’s difficult to move people away from these kinds of conveniences. Everyone is working harder and more precariously. They need these kinds of conveniences. What’s the chicken and what’s the egg? How much do we love convenience over decent pay and sustainable work?”


A glossary of Amazon terms:


Amazonians: People who work for Amazon


Amabot: An Amazon worker who can successfully “become one” with the system


Amazon Fulfillment Engine: Known as the AFE, this is a proprietary hyper-efficient system involving three tasks: sort, rebin and pack


From A to Z: An in-house magazine distributed to operations employees in 18 countries. It is translated into eight languages, and offers a peek inside “our innovative and peculiar culture”


Customer-centric, customer-obsessed: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has said his mission is the make it “Earth’s most customer-centric company.” According to the company’s leadership principles, “although leaders pay attention to competitors, they obsess over customers”


Fulfillment centre: Orwellian as this term might sound, the term was not coined by Amazon, but has been used for about 30 years as a euphemism for a warehouse where orders are received and products are picked and packaged for delivery


Kaizen: A Japanese term meaning “change for the better,” this is a method of continuous improvement through identifying waste and streamlining processes


Making the rate: Being able to complete a task at an assigned level. Workers who fail to “make the rate” face reprimand


Leadership principles: The 14 articles of faith Amazon runs on, ranging from urging workers to “think big” to accomplishing more with less. The principles also make it also it clear that leaders have relentlessly high standards, “even if many people think these standards are unreasonably high”


Stowers: Amazon workers who scan incoming products into a bar-coded shelf location so that the product can be ordered by customers


Pickers: Workers who pull ordered items from the warehouse into bins. Workers use electronic scanners for information on the items to be picked. The scanner also tells the worker how long they have left to complete the task


Packers: Workers who scan items and pack them into boxes for shipping


The Offer: A “pay to quit” proposal made to workers at fulfillment centres, offering them money to leave the company. Reportedly, in the first year of work, the offer is $2,000. It goes up by $1,000 every year until it hits $5,000


Tier 1: The lowest paid hourly workers, also know as “associates”


WOCAS report: An acronym that stands for “what our customers are saying.” These reports deliver customer service insights directly to department leaders


Source: The Amazon effect: Will Ottawa's new fulfillment centre create 'middle class' jobs?

40
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

41
Law enforcement 'Hoopstars' take on hard-core recreational ballers

Some of the city’s top basketball-playing police officers have picked up the ball to sustain the annual cops versus recreational ballers challenge at downtown St. Luke’s Park. While it is the first year for the event under the “Hoopstar Classic” banner, the competition had been a fixture among Ottawa’s downtown community for more than a […]

Some of the city’s top basketball-playing police officers have picked up the ball to sustain the annual cops versus recreational ballers challenge at downtown St. Luke’s Park.


While it is the first year for the event under the “Hoopstar Classic” banner, the competition had been a fixture among Ottawa’s downtown community for more than a decade.


In the past, the event was known as the Naqvi Cup tournament and community barbecue, and was sponsored by former Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi.


Naqvi helped to kickstart the event in 2005 after residents around the court, located just east of Elgin Street between Gladstone Avenue and Frank Street, complained that youth gathering at the court were making too much noise. Some speculated that the youth may be up to no good.


But Naqvi and the police who regularly patrolled the area claimed the youth were just playing basketball, although they were being competitive.



With police on side, the game became an annual event pitting the best of law enforcement’s basketball players against the best from St. Luke’s regulars, known as the St. Luke’s Bulls. The goal was to showcase how sport could benefit innercity youth while helping them to put a normal face to law enforcement officials, who can appear unapproachable while in uniform.


However, when Naqvi wasn’t re-elected in June, the future of the event seemed to be in jeopardy.


That’s when Ottawa constables Chabine Tucker and Jafeth Maseruka decided to pick up the ball and run with it.


Hoopsters Classic organizers Const. Jafeth Maseruka, left, and Const. Chabine Tucker. at St. Luke’s Park on Saturday, Aug. 18.


“It appeared it wasn’t going to happen and it didn’t make sense that it would just disappear,” Tucker said.


“It brings everyone in the community together,” Maseruka said. “It puts a face to who everybody is.”


One of the of the Hoopstars is Const. Kevin Graham, who drew attention earlier this month after a video emerged online of him, in boots and a bulletproof vest, schooling some youngsters in basketball while he was on patrol.


“Someone call a cop … that kid just got robbed! Oh, wait …” joked one follower Twitter commentator.



https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js


The tweet has garnered several hundred likes and dozens of retweets.



Source: Law enforcement 'Hoopstars' take on hard-core recreational ballers


42
Ottawa judge strikes down two mandatory minimum sentences for 'nice' pimp

An Ottawa judge has ruled that mandatory minimum sentences for two sex offences should not apply in the case of a naïve and unsophisticated pimp who unwittingly recruited and photographed two underage prostitutes. Justice Colin McKinnon said the minimum penalty demanded by law — a combined three-year prison term — would amount to cruel and […]

An Ottawa judge has ruled that mandatory minimum sentences for two sex offences should not apply in the case of a naïve and unsophisticated pimp who unwittingly recruited and photographed two underage prostitutes.


Justice Colin McKinnon said the minimum penalty demanded by law — a combined three-year prison term — would amount to cruel and unusual punishment for Steevenson Joseph, a 24-year-old first-time offender.


Since Joseph does not deserve any jail time, the judge said, “it follows that the mandatory minimum sentences for his offences are grossly disproportionate.”


As a result, McKinnon struck down as unconstitutional the mandatory minimums for two offences: receiving a benefit from the prostitution of someone under 18, and making and possessing child porn.


He imposed a suspended sentence in the case along with one of year of probation.


McKinnon’s decision represents the latest in a series of similar rulings during the past three years in which judges have balked at applying obligatory penalties established by the federal government in the Criminal Code.


The use of mandatory minimums was greatly expanded by the former Conservative government as part of its tough-on-crime agenda.


In an interview Wednesday, Joseph’s defence lawyer, Ewan Lyttle, called McKinnon’s decision “yet another example of the former Conservative government’s failed criminal justice policy.”


“These policies, designed only to appeal to voters — and not to make the system better — prevent judges from doing their jobs properly,” he said.


“In this case, the trial judge, who was most familiar with the facts of the case and circumstances of the offender, was forced by the former government to impose a cruel and unusual sentence. Instead of submitting to that unconstitutional direction, he opted to strike those laws down.”


In February, at the conclusion of a three-week trial, Joseph was convicted of three prostitution-related offences, along with making and possessing child pornography.


A jury acquitted him of more serious charges, including sexual assault and two charges related to underage prostitution.


The Crown asked for a three-and-a-half year penitentiary term for Joseph, while the defence sought a suspended sentence.


In his sentencing decision delivered Tuesday, McKinnon said he has dealt with many pimps and pornographers — none of them like Joseph.


“I have sent a number of them to penitentiary, including two child pornographers,” he said. “In stark contrast to those cases, the facts of this case constitute the least serious conduct witnessed by me in the context of prostitution and child pornography cases.”


A graduate of La Cité Collégiale, Joseph, 21 at the time, was depressed, lonely and living on his own in 2015 when a female friend involved in the sex trade told him about the lucrative business. Joseph later met a girl who told him that she was 18 and a college student. He asked her if she was interested in making money in the sex trade.


The woman, identified as C.A., told court that Joseph did not pressure her to engage in prostitution. She decided on her own to get involved, she testified, and brought her best friend, R.D., to meet Joseph since she was also interested in the sex trade.


Joseph took photos of the two girls — posed provocatively in bras and panties — and posted them on backpage.com, a website that carries escort service ads. (These pictures were later deemed child pornography.)


Both girls then used Joseph’s apartment to service clients.


Unbeknownst to Joseph, however, the girls were still in high school and under the age of 18.


Another girl from their high school, M.M., later contacted Joseph through social media and arranged to meet him and have sex. She was keen to get into the escort business, too, court heard, but her first job turned out to be part of an Ottawa police sting operation.


Joseph was arrested on June 17, 2015 and M.M. was taken to the police station to make a statement. She was just 15 years old.


During the trial, all three girls testified. They insisted that they were never pressured and decided to join the sex trade of their own free will, having lied about their ages.


“They all claimed that he (Joseph) was a very nice person, and that they were free to come and go to his apartment as they wished,” the judge said.


In deciding on a sentence, McKinnon said he took into account what he described as the “irreparable damage” done to Joseph by inflammatory media reports about his arrest based on exaggerated police claims.


Joseph was originally charged with human trafficking. At the time, Ottawa police said officers had rescued four young girls who were working in the sex trade against their will.


The charge of human trafficking was thrown out at a preliminary hearing and there was no evidence at trial to support the idea that police rescued anyone, the judge said.


Joseph spent four months in pre-trial custody and lived under “oppressive” bail conditions for more than two years, McKinnon noted, adding: “An objective view of the facts causes me to conclude that Mr. Joseph has been subjected to sufficient punishment.”


Lyttle said his client was immensely relieved by the judge’s decision, which brought an end to a three-year legal odyssey. Joseph, who plans to complete a university degree, declined an interview request.


Assistant Crown attorney Chantal Lefebvre said the case is now being reviewed by the Crown Law Office in Toronto to determine if it will be appealed.


Source: Ottawa judge strikes down two mandatory minimum sentences for 'nice' pimp

43
Dancehall duo Bonjay returns to hometown Ottawa for Bon-Fire

Bonjay When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday Bon-Fire 2018: Aug. 17-18, Rideau Pines Farm, 5714 Fourth Line Rd., North Gower Also performing: Wolf Parade, Casper Skulls, Jennifer Castle, Ansley Simpson, Shadowhand and more. Passes: $59.99 general admission, $49.99 for youths age 25 and under, includes free shuttle bus from Ottawa. Children 10 and under free. Schedule information and […]

Bonjay


When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday


Bon-Fire 2018: Aug. 17-18, Rideau Pines Farm, 5714 Fourth Line Rd., North Gower


Also performing: Wolf Parade, Casper Skulls, Jennifer Castle, Ansley Simpson, Shadowhand and more.


Passes: $59.99 general admission, $49.99 for youths age 25 and under, includes free shuttle bus from Ottawa. Children 10 and under free.


Schedule information and ticket purchases: arboretumfestival.com.


*******


It’s a commonly accepted nugget of dance-floor etiquette that you don’t interrupt the DJ when he or she is mixing the music that’s making everyone dance.


But singer-songwriter Alanna Stuart, who’s one half of the duo Bonjay, couldn’t help herself when she joined friends at a party in Ottawa’s Chinatown neighbourhood more than a decade ago. Though raised in Orléans, she had just moved back to Ottawa to attend university, she recalls, and was “hungry for something more, musically and culturally.


“I remember walking up the narrow staircase to the attic, and hearing this remix of Fela Kuti’s Zombie. I was mesmerized by the polyrhythms, the freshness of it. I saw the crowd sweating profusely and almost convulsing to the music,” she says.


It was one of the legendary Disorganized parties — a monthly residency hosted by an Ottawa DJ collective — and Stuart recognized people she knew from the punk, hip hop and soul scenes. She had a revelation.


“I realized, ‘This is who I am,’” she says. “‘This is where I need to be.’ And playing that song in this tiny little DJ booth was Ian (Swain). I didn’t know whether he was a producer or not but I ran up to him and explained that I was a pop/R&B singer wanting to do something different. He was in the middle of mixing and I broke a cardinal rule of interrupting a DJ mix. He was like, ‘Uh, okay, here’s my card.’ I just trusted his instinct and that has not wavered.”


In the studio, Swain, aka DJ Pho, forgave her transgression.


“If I hadn’t met Alanna, I don’t think I would be making music in the same way,” he says. “Basically I come from DJing and whatever nexus of music I’m playing. Alanna comes from singing in the church, and the 2000 indie scene is where she found her voice. Where we meet in the middle is dancehall, so it really is unique.”


The soul singer and the DJ made an EP, Broughtupsy, that came out in 2010 and earned them a cult following.


Bonjay, consisting of Alanna Stuart and Ian Swain. (Credit: May Truong)


Then came a long period of artistic development that finally ended earlier this year when they released Lush Life, an album that Exclaim! magazine describes as “one of the very best R&B albums of 2018.” A polished mix of R&B, techno and dancehall, with a songwriter’s sensibility, it was also longlisted for the Polaris Prize.


For Stuart, the artistic development involved studying theatre in London and dance in Montreal, while Swain delved into music theory, and learned to play all the instruments.


The songs on Lush Life explore how we live in cities, a theme that emerged thanks in part to Swain’s day job as an economist researching the growth of cities. He and musician/consultant Andrew Vincent co-authored the 2015 report Connecting Ottawa Music: A Profile of Ottawa’s Music Industries, which analyzed the state of Ottawa’s music scene and recommended ways for it to expand. The report sparked the creation of the Ottawa Music Industry Coalition and led to the city implementing a music strategy.


“Visiting Ian at his work place, I’d be privy to certain conversations about urban planning or music in cities so I feel like those ideas had set in my subconscious,” Stuart says. “And also just being a black woman in Canada, it’s no surprise that ideas of identity and diversity would be expressed lyrically.”


Although Bonjay is now based in Toronto, they can see how being from Ottawa led to their unique musical style.


“Sometimes people don’t see Ottawa as being a place where the unexpected can happen,” says Stuart. “Being a government town and a university town, it can be a bit conservative and we have to work so much harder to create something different. We don’t necessarily have this template for how to do that so we have to create our own way, unencumbered by industry standards and trends and things like that.”


“Merging dancehall with the indie songwriter side of music doesn’t always make sense and isn’t always easy,” adds Swain. “The idea that we took these influences and we built on them and took them in our own unique direction, that is the greatest fulfillment I could ever get.”


The duo hints at some big things to come over the next few months, and they promise it won’t take another eight years to create more music. In the meantime, they’re thrilled to return to hometown Ottawa to play Arboretum’s Bon-Fire festival.


“Bonjay is from Ottawa’s Chinatown, and Bonjay is from the Clocktower Pub in the Glebe, and to come back to play in Ottawa always feels like a homecoming,” says Stuart. “It will be nice to play outdoors because it’s home, and also because it reminds me of Jamaica, where I’ve never been to an indoor party or show. Ever. It’s always under the open sky, and there’s this feeling of freedom and expanse. I just want to open my arms wide and sing.”


lsaxberg@postmedia.com


 


Source: Dancehall duo Bonjay returns to hometown Ottawa for Bon-Fire

44
Provincewide psychiatrist shortage strains Ottawa's resources

The wide and worsening shortage of psychiatrists in Ontario is impacting the Ottawa area, and the city needs around 25 more psychiatrists to make up the difference, says the president of the Ontario Psychiatric Association. Dr. Mathieu Dufour, associate chief at The Royal, is one of the co-chairs with the Coalition of Ontario Psychiatrists, who […]

The wide and worsening shortage of psychiatrists in Ontario is impacting the Ottawa area, and the city needs around 25 more psychiatrists to make up the difference, says the president of the Ontario Psychiatric Association.


Dr. Mathieu Dufour, associate chief at The Royal, is one of the co-chairs with the Coalition of Ontario Psychiatrists, who released a report last week that said Ontario is facing a shortage of psychiatrists that is expected to worsen by 2030.


The report, plainly titled “Ontario needs psychiatrists,” found that Ontario has a shortage of about 200 psychiatrists. By 2030, that number is forecast to rise to 350.


That provincial shortage exists on a local level as well, said Dufour. “Just recently, we know that there’s between 20 and 25 psychiatrists missing in the whole region,” he said. That shortage is similar in scale to what other urban centres in the province are facing, but since Ottawa encompasses so many rural areas, other challenges are present.


“There might be a bigger shortage of psychiatrists in rural area,” said Dufour. “That’s for sure. There’s more difficulty accessing psychiatric care in the region of Ottawa if you’re outside of Ottawa.


The shortage in Ottawa and across the province touches different areas of psychiatry, but the report points out that there is an “acute shortage” of community-based psychiatrists, which in turns adds to the workload of psychiatrists who work in hospitals and emergency departments.


“We certainly need more community-based psychiatrists in the region of Ottawa,” said Dufour. It is not, however, the case that we need community-based psychiatrists exclusively. “But we also need, I would say most hospitals — acute care hospitals and The Royal — we also suffer from that shortage.”


The report also singles out child and youth psychiatric services as an area in which this pinch in psychiatrists is particularly worrisome. The report found that Canada needs about 1,500 child and youth psychiatrists but that there are only about 500 active; in Ontario, there are fewer than 100 child psychiatrists, mostly in urban areas, leaving parts of the province “entirely unserved.”


Joanne Lowe, executive director of Ottawa’s Youth Services Bureau (YSB), sits at the intersection of those two concerns. She sees day in and day out how that shortage impacts young people. “We certainly see that for young people, the whole lack of mental health services in general plays itself out through the absence of child and youth psychiatrists, for sure,” said Lowe. “If there is a need for a psychiatrist, that’s when it becomes more challenging when you’re trying to find someone.”


Joanne Lowe, executive director, Youth Services Bureau. James Park, Postmedia


A psychiatrist shortage is a problem that will continue to grow as psychiatrists age out of the system with little in the way of young replacements. 56 per cent of the psychiatrists in Ontario are above the age of 55, the report notes; only 4.3 per cent of psychiatrists surveyed were below the age of 35. The report does not mince words on this point, saying that “the efforts made to recruit students to psychiatry are abysmal.”


Part of the problem, notes the report, is that every year psychiatry residencies — the specialized training positions in medical school that qualify one to practise psychiatry and other specialties — go unfilled despite excess demand for them. In 2018, for instance, 190 medical students ranked psychiatry as their preferred discipline, but of 184 residencies available, only 175 were filled.


“We need to ensure all psychiatry residency spots are filled,” reads the report. “The need for psychiatric services is too great, and the effects of psychiatric shortage are too severe, to fail here year after year.”


Though the report points out that in 2017 that the University of Ottawa left two residencies unfilled, Véronique Vallée, a spokeswoman for the university, confirmed that all residency spots were filled for the past five years.


Dufour said that making sure the local medical school fills all its vacancies is a start toward attracting more psychiatrists to Ottawa in the first place. “We try to retain them as much as we could,” he said. “We’ve also been trying to recruit out of the province, out of the country as well to get some good candidates to provide mental health services.”


The supply of psychiatrists and the number being trained annually give shape to the resource management challenges that front-line services face. Lowe said she was hesitant to put a number on the shortage of psychiatrists that her organization, and the field of child and youth psychiatry in Ottawa sees; she jokes that if she could, she would hire 100 new staff and start there.


“I mean, let’s be really clear. Do we need more child and youth psychiatrists? Absolutely,” she said. ““It’s an imperfect system. I’ll be the first person to say that.”


Efforts to increase the number of psychiatrists working in the province by incentivizing psychiatry in medical school have a built-in lag time for training, which means that in the short-term the field will continue to feel the pinch in Ottawa.


“As psychiatrists we have seen the increased demands,” says Dufour. “Psychiatrists have responded by actually increasing their hours and the number of patients they see. Over 10 years, psychiatrists have increased by 20 per cent (in terms of) their hours and the number of patients they see.”


Lowe admits that more funding would be nice, but in the interim they will continue to work with partners to try to marshal what resources they do have to the right places. “The gaps not just in the what we have, but how we use our existing resources,” she said, and then jokes: “if you could write me a blank cheque I’d be good with that.”




If you are experiencing a mental health crisis, you can call the 24/7 Mental Health Crisis Line at 613-722-6914. If you’re a young person experiencing difficulties, you can call the Youth Services Bureau at 613-260-2360 or talk to someone online, between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m., at http://www.chat.ysb.ca.


Source: Provincewide psychiatrist shortage strains Ottawa's resources

45
Defence Watch / Today's letters: The power of the Last Post
« on: August 11, 2018, 07:03:41 AM »
Today's letters: The power of the Last Post

The power of the Last Post RE: Lloyd Maxwell died alone but not unnoticed, Aug. 9 I was the bugler in the RCMP Cemetery that you referred to in Thursday’s article. I can assure you that as I stand among the headstones I am playing for everyone of them. Of course I was there for […]

The power of the Last Post


RE: Lloyd Maxwell died alone but not unnoticed, Aug. 9


I was the bugler in the RCMP Cemetery that you referred to in Thursday’s article. I can assure you that as I stand among the headstones I am playing for everyone of them. Of course I was there for a particular family and friends but the Last Post is to be shared by all those who can hear and those that lie in silence. I have played in Canadian Cemeteries in Holland and Hong Kong and the sadness is palpable and as you look at the rows of young soldiers. My mind goes back over my own family that have served and to those who never come home.


The Last Post was for Lloyd Maxwell just as much as it was that RCMP family who had just lost a father, grandfather and colleague.


I am a member of the RCMP Pipe Band in Ottawa. We are almost all volunteers from the community who play for nothing more than making music and supporting the RCMP in Canada and around the world. I have the additional privilege of playing bugle and trumpet calls as needed.


To read your story today brought tears to my eyes as I learned that my “call” reached out to another Canadian that served.


Bless them all.


Charles Armstrong, Ottawa


 


Chef’s actions speak volumes


Re: Acclaimed chef to close Beechwood Gastropub


This article clearly depicted the journey and reality of “much respected young chef/owner Harriet Clunie”.

The captioned 13 words “I learned a lot. It’s only going to make me a stronger chef” clearly depicted her positive attitude. The article also shares some of the lessons learned.  It is a shame that she had to withdraw from this fall’s Gold Medal Plates competition. A prestigious invitation that she earned.  It is commendable that Chef Clunie is donating whatever food is left to Ottawa-area shelters. Giving to those in need during a personal hardship speaks volumes. (Although a reality, perplexing that the restaurant “perpetually been short-staffed”.)

Steve Georgopoulos, Orleans




Photo radar the right approach

Adding additional police officers in a cash-strapped economy to battle crime and violence is enough justification to establish an aggressive photo radar program to deal with aggressive drivers. Having a police officer sitting on the side of the road catching those speeders who haven’t been warned in advance is a hit-and-miss practice. Photo radar works 24/7 with no brakes, no idling emissions, no waste of resources and is a constant reminder for the motoring public to obey the law.  As for the invasion of any personal privacy you gave that up when you choose to put public safety in jeopardy.

Gord Mills, North Gower


 


The real value of the modern royals is their celebrity cachet


Re: The summer of Meghan Markle and all the tired ways we talk about royal women (Aug 10)


The only way that royalty really makes sense in today’s world is to turn them into celebrities. We definitely live in a shallow celebrity age where people are famous for just being famous. Watchers live through their celebrities just as sports fans idolize their sports heroes who make millions (funded often by the fans). Duty and loyalty are no longer important – it’s now all about the glitz, glamour, and schmaltz. Someone once said, in commenting on the state of monarchy in the world, that in the future there will only be five queens left: the Queen of Clubs, the Queen of Spades, the Queen of Hearts, the Queen of Diamonds, and the Queen of England. Queen Elizabeth will definitely be the last true Queen, void of all the Hollywood, showbizzy glitz and phony glamour. The irony is that in the old days the people were subjects to the Queen and Kings not by choice, but today the monarchy still holds court over the average person, and people now are subjects to the monarchy by choice. People often worship and adore what they themselves are lacking in their own lives. It’s the royal conundrum.


Douglas Cornish, Ottawa


 


Don’t erase history, but don’t sugarcoat it either


RE: Victoria removing Sir John A’s statue from city hall


Racism and slavery were accepted in many countries in the 19th century. “Accepted” by the ruling classes, who gave consideration only to their own judgments, while ignoring the injustices inflicted on the victims of their actions.


Historians say Sir John A. Macdonald had no regard whatsoever for our indigenous peoples. He thought they were disposable, and at best, should be assimilated. The fact that residential schools were inhuman and immoral should therefore not be surprising.


Because he was a prime mover for residential schools, schools named after Macdonald should be renamed. And all statues of him in public spaces should be retrofitted with plaques that describe the culture of that time, Macdonald’s valuable contributions to Canada, and as well, the residential schools disaster. Without candy-coating.


Brian Boyd, Orleans


 


Canada doesn’t have monopoly on values


I don’t think I am alone in wishing that Justin Trudeau and his ministers would cease using the meaningless expression “Canadian Values”. The implication is that Canada has a monopoly on all things bright and beautiful. All freedom-loving democracies share the same concerns for issues such as human rights and the environment, although such countries, regrettably, are probably a minority among the nations of the world.  I believe Americans are among those who cherish these principles even though their president does not.


If the composition of the United Nations is any example it is a sad reality that many of its members are governed by oppressive tyrants who have no regard for rights. Canada is a victim of one such regime, Saudi Arabia.


Philip Laundy, Ottawa



Let’s use this imbroglio to review Canada’s prosperity strategy

Global Affairs Minister Freedman did not show the most diplomatic smarts by criticizing the Saudis on social media regarding their human rights abuses. What it did though was to expose those abuses to the whole world. It also provided a chance to witness how far this regime is ready to go to try to intimidate international voices from publicly criticizing their human rights abuses.


As far as I am concerned, let them terminate diplomatic relations with us. Let them sell their assets in Canada and then, as your columnist Andrew Cohen rightly suggested, to let us reclaim their embassy on Ottawa’s ceremonial route and reassign it to a country that respects human rights. Let them repatriate their own citizens studying in Canada including all the Saudi medical residents; that way this will provide required residency positions to our own Canadian citizens waiting for such openings. Let those frustrated Saudi students get mad at their own authoritarian government regime. In reality, these repatriated students may become human rights allies and activists in their own country.


Let us use this imbroglio as an opportunity to review our own future prosperity strategy. For instance, let’s implement measures that will help us to become more self reliant on our own resources. Perhaps one day we will thank the Saudis for having kicked us hard enough to convince all of us that commerce cannot trump (no pun intended) human rights activism. It may perhaps become an opportunity to send the White House regime a clear message that we can be creative in protecting our future economic prosperity.

Ghislain St-Jacques, Ottawa

 


What about Canada’s imprisoned activists?


It is reported that Saudi Arabia has expelled the Canadian ambassador and frozen “all new business” with Ottawa over criticism of the kingdom’s arrest of women’s rights activists.


The kingdom’s foreign minister, Adel Al-Jubeir, said the next wave of retaliatory steps could affect investment flows between the countries. Saudi Arabia’s central bank and pension funds have already begun selling Canadian assets, according to reports that triggered brief selling of the loonie.


At the same time, 214 social activists, many of them women, have been arrested in Vancouver and charged, with the full support and encouragement of the Canadian government, with protesting the proposed Trans Mountain expansion.


What blatant and shockingly self-serving hypocrisy on the part of Justin Trudeau!


Mike Priaro, Calgary


 


Foreign student tuition masks a real funding problem


RE: Saudi Dispute Hits Hospitals, Aug. 9


The suggestion that because the payment by the Saudis for medical positions in our universities and hospitals creates positions over and above what our provinces fund, is very misleading, and speaks to the short-sightedness of our current reality. We are chronically short doctors because our government does not provide enough financial support for medical positions to serve the needs of the Canadian public. One of the reasons they provide insufficient funding is because we pursue the short-term fiscal strategy of big bucks associated with foreign students. The result is that qualified Canadian medical students are either denied entry to our local schools and hospitals, or they are forced to go abroad for their training. This is discouraging and unfair to our local youth, and in the end only hurts the Canadian public. This is exacerbated by the fact that we the taxpayers pay (and have paid for) the vast majority of the school and hospital infrastructures that supports this medical training. So school, hospital, and government bureaucrats, please spare me the crocodile tears in lamenting the loss of the foreign students, when in fact this should wake us up to the reality that we must reduce our reliance on foreign student cash, in order to properly serving our local youth, and our taxpayers. In other words, reduce the number of foreign medical students, since it impinges on our ability to serve our own needs first.


Frank Scott, Ottawa


 


Canada has nothing to apologize for


I don’t often agree with PM Trudeau but this is an exception. As Canadians we have every right to speak about the need to respect human rights.


Let the Saudi continue to live in the Stone Age where it is common to persecute the family of critics if you can’t otherwise silence them.


Recalling their 16,000 students hurts them more than us. A recall leaves their valuable training incomplete and them unqualified. Banning new Canadian business and selling off Canadian assets will again hurt them more. Others will come for the smell of good investment deals to be had at a sell-off discount. We have our own oil and don’t need theirs. They have no clout. We should, in fact, put a freeze on their massive Canadian arms deal agreement until they pull in their blunt horns.


We have no need to apologize, retract, or express regret for advocating for human rights.


Leif Schonberg, Osgoode


 


Pay attention to problems at home


While our Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland does her virtual signalling on twitter regarding Saudia Arabia, is she aware that in Canada, dairy farmers who offer raw milk to Canadians that cannot digest pasteurized milk without becoming extremely sick are charged huge fines to adhere to out-dated regulations and if they refuse to cease and desist are charged with obstruction and put in jail. Durham raw milk farmer Michael Schmidt spent time in Penetanguishene’s maximum security jail in 2017 for this transgression. Canadians were shocked and surprised as raw milk is not illegal to drink in Canada.


Yours truly was also charged for several related offenses and was also threatened with jail time. In the meantime, Europe has thousands of raw milk vending machines.


Michael Ilgert, Golden Lake


 


 


Source: Today's letters: The power of the Last Post

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 522