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My Transition Services by Canadian Defence Academy (Dept. of National Def.) https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/my-transition-services/id1439355659?mt=8
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Two roofers charged with fraud after dozens of complaints

After dozens of complaints, Ottawa police fraud investigators have charged two roofers with pocketing money but leaving dozens of roofing jobs unfinished. The woman and man are the owner and an employee of Ottawa Permanent Roofing, police said. Hanan El Badry, 27, of Ottawa and Hugh Arnold, 61, of Kelowna, are charged with 45 counts […]

After dozens of complaints, Ottawa police fraud investigators have charged two roofers with pocketing money but leaving dozens of roofing jobs unfinished.


The woman and man are the owner and an employee of Ottawa Permanent Roofing, police said.


Hanan El Badry, 27, of Ottawa and Hugh Arnold, 61, of Kelowna, are charged with 45 counts of fraud over $5,000.


El Badry is the owner. Police said Arnold also sometimes used the name Anthony El Badry. He was arrested by the RCMP in Kelowna and is now in custody in Ottawa.


Police said they have received more than 49 complaints, and there may be more unhappy customers.


Anyone with information is asked to contact the fraud unit at (613) 236-1222, extension 5292 or to call Crime Stoppers at (613) 233-8477 (TIPS) or toll-free at 1-800-222-8477.


Police also suggest that people who need roof repairs should view the Consumer Protection Ontario website at https://www.ontario.ca/page/hiring-roofer.




ALSO IN THE NEWS:


Firefighters quickly extinguish kitchen fire


The most unpredictable gangland Ottawa murder trial in recent history ends in acquittals


‘I don’t really care who gets killed’: SIU report details fatal 2017 crash in Arnprior, clears police officers.




tspears@postmedia.com


twitter.com/TomSpears1


 


Source: Two roofers charged with fraud after dozens of complaints
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Defence Watch / Blow stop signs? Run reds? It's deadly and expensive
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on November 01, 2018, 01:00:22 PM »
Blow stop signs? Run reds? It's deadly and expensive

Ottawa and Gatineau police traffic officers will be stepping up enforcement at red lights and stop signs this month. It’s a potentially deadly practice, note members of the Selective Traffic Enforcement Program (STEP) and costly, too. Between 2012 and 2016, the 3,759 collisions involving running a red resulted in 1,562 people get hurt and killed four, […]

Ottawa and Gatineau police traffic officers will be stepping up enforcement at red lights and stop signs this month.


It’s a potentially deadly practice, note members of the Selective Traffic Enforcement Program (STEP) and costly, too.


Between 2012 and 2016, the 3,759 collisions involving running a red resulted in 1,562 people get hurt and killed four, police report. Meanwhile, the 3,129 collisions caused by failing to stop at a stop sign caused 995 injuries and three deaths.


A ticket for running a red will cost you $325 and failing to stop for a stop sign is $110 plus a penalty for both of three demerits.


Source: Blow stop signs? Run reds? It's deadly and expensive
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Today's letters: Why we must tackle the carbon problem

Tuesday, Oct. 30: A few words on climate change, mandatory voting and pot recipes. You can write to us too at letters@ottawacitizen.com

Atmosphere needs to stay in balance


Re: Letters – Stop staring at my soft drink, and carbon dioxide is not pollution, Oct. 27.


Letter-writers Colin Alexander and David Wieland asked why carbon dioxide is treated as a pollutant in the fight to protect against extreme climate change.


CO2, water vapor, nitrogen and oxygen are all part of the atmosphere and necessary for life as we know it. But none of us would survive in a room full of CO2, just as we would drown in a room full of water or risk immolation in a room full of oxygen.


The balance of the gases determines the behaviour of our atmosphere, which helps trap the heat from the sun and support life. If the blanket of gases changes too much, the heat has an effect on plants and animals, and the physics of our weather systems also change. The CO2 also increases the acidity of the ocean, and we are already seeing a negative effect on the ability of organisms to convert calcium into shell and bone.


The CO2 in Alexander’s drinks is extracted from the existing supply in the atmosphere either mechanically or with yeast, so there is little change to the natural balance. However, when we began to burn fossil fuels on an industrial scale in the 1800s, we also began to change the atmosphere, adding carbon that has been buried underground for millennia. That is the threat that has been documented for decades, and the reason we need concerted and serious action by all governments today.


Phil Kinsman, Ottawa


Mandatory voting is a bad idea


Re: Letter, It’s time to require mandatory voting, Oct. 27.


A vote should be an informed vote. Citizens who don’t vote probably don’t care what the governments decide. These citizens are likely not aware of the party platforms and issues or the division of responsibilities undertaken by the municipal, provincial and federal governments.


Do we really want to increase the vote in order to have participation with questionable knowledge or logic? Perhaps mandatory voting could be accompanied by a mandatory 10-question quiz with a 50-per-cent pass mark prior to receiving a ballot. Maybe the participation rate would be even lower, but informed.


Ron Lewis, Kemptville


The right to vote means the right not to, as well


To even consider the idea of mandatory voting is absurd, to say the least. Why would anyone be forced to vote for a candidate with whom they were dissatisfied?


In Canada, our right to vote has been preserved in democracy. Is it not also that same democratic right that allows us to withhold our vote, for whatever reason, should we decide to do so?


Paul Finnigan, Ottawa


Pot recipes were irresponsible


Re: Beyond the cookie jar, Oct. 24.


I was very surprised that a paper as influential as The Citizen would print a full page of recipes of edible cannabis product. If the prime minister had listened to the advice of psychologists, therapists and psychiatrists about how, a young person’s brain is not fully developed until 25, his decision to legalize marijuana, I would hope, would have been different.


My question is: If kids under the legal age of 19 get into the “weed-infused” cream used in the truffles, or use the “flower-infused olive oil” on a salad, to what degree would the Citizen accept some of the responsibility for having printed these recipes to begin with?


Heather Morrow, Ottawa


 


 


Source: Today's letters: Why we must tackle the carbon problem
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Ottawa's urban farming leverages appetite for locally grown food

The modern face of farming in this region is changing. In a multi-part series, this paper looks at the evolution underway in agriculture and how it’s changing our rural and urban communities. ••• Neither heat-scorched drought nor record rainfall could dry up or dampen David Mazur-Goulet’s enthusiasm to be a successful urban farmer in Ottawa. […]

The modern face of farming in this region is changing. In a multi-part series, this paper looks at the evolution underway in agriculture and how it’s changing our rural and urban communities.


•••


Neither heat-scorched drought nor record rainfall could dry up or dampen David Mazur-Goulet’s enthusiasm to be a successful urban farmer in Ottawa.


BeetBox, a one-acre co-operative farm he and two other eco-centric, sustainable-food-producing enthusiasts established last year on Davidson’s Side Road in Nepean, defied weather challenges to produce a bountiful crop of about 30 soon-to-be, certified-organic vegetables for 106 customers who paid in advance to receive weekly or biweekly baskets of fresh produce.


The urban micro-farm’s VegBox CSA (community-supported agriculture) program sold out this year, and earned Mazur-Goulet and his business partners, Jeremy Colbeck and Lise-Anne Léveillé, $38,000 in revenue in its first year of operation.


It is a modest return, considering that the trio draw income from sales, and have to pay the National Capital Commission, which owns the 1,100-acre Greenbelt property on which the farm is located, $2,400 in monthly rent.


For now, the three BeetBoxers, who also work on the vegetable farm, earn a minimum wage. But Mazur-Goulet has high hopes that the business seed the co-op has planted on an acreage situated between Carling Avenue and the Ottawa River will soon reap rewards.


“We expect to be profitable by the end of our second year,” he says.


David Mazur-Goulet and his business partners, Jeremy Colbeck and Lise-Anne Leveille, earned $38,000 in revenue in their first year of operation.


BeetBox is among about 25 small-scale vegetable farms that lease land from the NCC. The farm also reflects a demographic trend, according to the NCC’s chief of agricultural and residential property management.


Geoff Frigon says that demand for urban farmland is increasing, particularly from prospective tenants in and around the millennial age-range of between 28 and 40 years old.


“What I’m hearing is that they don’t want to work in an office anymore and want to reconnect with the land,” he explains. “Some are done with their careers and want to try something different.”


Frigon says that he and members of his team receive “dozens of calls a week” from current and new urban farmers looking for land.


With less than a one per cent vacancy rate, competition for space is tight and the NCC screens applicants based on their farming knowledge and intent.


One with considerable experience that recently signed a 25-year lease with the NCC is Gourmet Acres, which, Frigon highlights, is one of Canada’s largest producers of cauliflower and broccoli. It relocated from Greely to a 660-acre parcel of land located at the intersection of Russell Road and Anderson Road in Ottawa’s east end.


Other NCC tenants include non-profit group Just Food, which runs a 150-acre farm on the west side of Blackburn Hamlet and offers a start-up program for budding farmers in the Ottawa region, and Youth Now Farm, which engages teenagers facing challenges in raising livestock and growing vegetables on a 70-acre plot of land on Russell Road in Carlsbad Springs.


Then there’s BeetBox, which is sowing the seeds for future growth.


BeetBox, a one-acre co-operative farm started last year on Davidson’s Side Road in Nepean, produces certified-organic vegetables.


Incorporated as a workers’ co-op in 2017, the vegetable farm has sold preference shares to nine other investors, excluding the three founders, which will provide a three per cent annual return starting in January 2019 for five years. The $32,500 raised will allow the farm to invest in equipment to expand to three acres next year and hire two more workers.


BeetBox bought the greenhouse on the land from the previous farm on the property known as Riverglen, and Mazur-Goulet, Colbeck and Léveillé live in the more than century-old, four-bedroom farmhouse. (Mazur-Goulet’s life partner, Kate Garvie, who runs her own one-acre organic vegetable farm called Heartbeet in Woodlawn, is also a resident.)


Lise-Anne Leveille of BeetBox manages international programs at USC Canada, which promotes sustainable small-scale farming globally.


“With our low margins, we have to be careful where we spend money to grow the business,” Mazur-Goulet says.


“We are also learning about the characteristics of the land, such as understanding the soil and what we need to add to it, and knowing where water may accumulate and where there is drainage.”


The 30-year-old Ottawa native, who was raised in Hintonburg, is a fourth generation branch of a family tree that leans toward agricultural.


His maternal great-grandfather, Louis Goulet, was a market-gardener in the Vanleek Hill area, and his paternal great-grandfather, Alexander Cottick, grew wheat in Dauphin, Man., home to many Ukrainian-Canadian immigrants.


Mazur-Goulet also briefly worked on a farm in Vermont in 2012 when he was pursuing a certificate in sustainable vegetable production from the University of Vermont.


But the idea for launching an urban farm sprouted from a market garden he started in 2014 in L’Ange-Gardien, near Buckingham, Que.


Mazur-Goulet called it The BeetBox, and grew and sold 25 different types of certified organic vegetables — from heirloom tomatoes and peppers to beets, cabbage and carrots — that are on the current BeetBox’s list of veggies for sale.



He got a sense of the appetite Outaouais residents have for locally grown vegetables and encountered an opportunity to advance his foray into farming at an eastern Ontario mixer for new farmers two years ago where he met Colbeck, who has a diploma in aerospace engineering from Carleton University and had previously worked at three market-garden farms, and Léveillé, who manages international programs at USC Canada, which promotes sustainable small-scale farming globally.


The three became fast friends, and recognized a chance to establish a farm co-op based on the changing agricultural landscape.


“We realized that the concept of the family farm was dying, and many people don’t have the money to purchase a large farm to keep that tradition going,” explains Mazur-Goulet, who earned diplomas in entrepreneurship and green business management from Algonquin College. “But we also knew that more and more people want local and fresh food, and thought that we could start something small in the city and grow the business little by little.”


David Mazur-Goulet.


The trio visited about 30 properties in the Ottawa-Gatineau region before settling on their current digs, based largely on the ability to live on the farm along with the bonus feature that it is also accessible by public transit.


They then prepared their business model. Rather than selling their vegetables at farmers’ markets, or to grocery stores and restaurants, BeetBox’s founders decided to pre-sell their VegBoxes through two options. From December to June, customers either pay $530 to receive 16 boxes a week from late June to early October, or $280 for eight boxes every two weeks during the same period, and pick them up either at the farm or at the Kanata North Community Hub at 400 March Rd.


“The idea behind our approach to community-supported agriculture is simple yet elegant,” Mazur-Goulet explains. “Members of the community want fresh vegetables in the summer, and pay in advance for that privilege and to support us purchasing the materials and supplies that we need to grow the food and pay ourselves a fair wage.”


There are some restrictions and risks associated with the VegBox program. Customers don’t get to choose which vegetables are included in their baskets. And if crops get damaged by flooding, drought or hail, there also may be fewer greens and legumes in the VegBox.


“We hope that our clients support us through the tough times,” says Mazur-Goulet. “They share the bounty and share the risk.”


However, it may not be as much of a gamble in the future.


Signs all around the large NCC plot of land note that farmers have arrived.


BeetBox plans to add raspberries and strawberries to its basket, and diversify its offerings.


“We’re looking at selling eggs, chicken and beef in the future,” Mazur-Goulet says.


Bringing the farm to the city reflects the desire of people to both produce their own food and be close to the people that do, says the NCC’s Frigon, who was raised in a family that ran greenhouses in Leamington, Ont.


“The family farm started changing in the early ’60s, when big farms started buying out small farms for the sheer reason of feeding as many people as possible. What we’re now seeing is a response to that; we’ve lost that relationship with our food producers and now want to go back to where people in the community can get to know farmers and their techniques and feel comfortable that their food is being produced in a sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially viable way,” he explains.


“We’re in a unique situation with the Greenbelt. Within a 30-kilometre radius, there are over 100 farms and over a million people who have access to them. Between 15 and 20 minutes, you can drive to almost every farm the NCC has.”


BeetBox in brief


• BeetBox’s growing season runs from March, when the planting of beets, lettuce, cabbage, kale, carrots and green onions begins in the greenhouse. In May, the farming shifts to the field where sugar snap peas, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, potatoes, green beans, winter squash, butternut squash, basil, cilantro and dill are grown. (The butternut squash is grown as part of a plant-breeding program to develop a squash specific to the Ottawa region.)


• VegBoxes sell for $530 for 16 weekly boxes or $280 for 8 boxes every two weeks


• In its first year of operation, BeetBox earned $38,000 in revenue and raised $32,500 in preferred shares from investors


Source: Ottawa's urban farming leverages appetite for locally grown food
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Glass in Ottawa's LRT stations could lead to more bird deaths, activist says

The extensive amount of clear glass surrounding the city’s new Light Rail Transit stations poses a serious threat to the city’s bird population, says an Ottawa activist. Anouk Hoedeman, founder of Safe Wings Ottawa, which lobbies to make structures in the city safe for birds, says Ottawa sees more than 250,000 bird deaths annually as […]

The extensive amount of clear glass surrounding the city’s new Light Rail Transit stations poses a serious threat to the city’s bird population, says an Ottawa activist.


Anouk Hoedeman, founder of Safe Wings Ottawa, which lobbies to make structures in the city safe for birds, says Ottawa sees more than 250,000 bird deaths annually as a result of clear glass on buildings.


“What we have in these stations is an awful lot of glass,” said Hoedeman. “We already have a big issue with birds colliding with buildings. These stations will pose a huge additional hazard to birds. There is no pattern on the glass, there is nothing to make them bird-friendly.”


Hoedeman also said the bright light levels inside the buildings at night will compound the problem. The bright lights will lure birds to the area, leading many to slam into the glass.


“Birds either see reflections of habitats in glass or they see through glass,” said Hoedeman. “They just don’t understand glass. If they see a reflection of a tree, they just think that is a tree.”


Hoedeman criticized the National Arts Centre expansion, saying that it also used plain clear glass that is detrimental to birds downtown.


However she warned, after watching the construction of several LRT stations, that the stations could be even worse for bird deaths because they are located in areas where there are high populations of birds.


Some buildings, such as a second-storey overpass at City Hall, have been forced to implement additional safeguards after a rising bird death toll.


In 2016, following a large number of bird deaths, city hall staff were forced to cover the overpass glass with paper to make it more visible to birds. The city later covered the glass with stickers, increasing visibility.


Other structures, such as the Place Bell at 160 Elgin St., includes lines through the glass that birds can see and avoid the building.


The City of Ottawa said Thursday that measures were being taken at the new LRT stations to mitigate bird deaths.


“With the high number of birds killed every year in Ottawa in collisions with glass and glass-like structures, the City of Ottawa felt it was important to try and address this in its LRT planning,” the city said in an email attributed to Steve Cripps, director of O-Train construction. He is quoted as saying that builder Rideau Transit Group’s architects and planners “are well aware of the serious threat (and) took several steps to incorporate this knowledge into their designs.”


He said the stations will work to lower lighting levels, employ overhangs and limit reflective glass. Vegetation around the stations will also be limited in a bid to keep birds further away from the train stops.


But Hoedeman was not convinced.


“I have not been reassured by anything that they have told me,” said Hoedeman. “From what I’ve see in the stations downtown, they all look pretty lethal to me. I’m looking at all that glass and it is not bird-friendly glass. I’m still quite concerned that this is going to be a big problem.”





Source: Glass in Ottawa's LRT stations could lead to more bird deaths, activist says
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***Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Online Request***

Please click here to process your claim online: https://atip-aiprp.apps.gc.ca/atip/welcome.do


For VAC you should request:

PPU: 055 (Pensions and Compensation), 560 (Disability Awards, Death Benefit and Detention Benefit), 030 (Treatment of a Pensioned/Awarded Condition), 550 (Rehabilitation Services and Vocational Assistance), 010 (Educational Assistance), 056 (Veterans Independence Program), 016 (Residential Care), 520 (Health Benefits Program/Public Service Health Care Plan), 020 (Health Care Programs Non-pension Related), 080 (Reviews & Appeals) and 090 (Bureau of Pensions Advocates) and All Services All Summary Assessment. Indicate for which period, from to, of time you are requesting the information. For VAc it should be the initial time you filed a pension application or you had any dealing with VAC.

For DND you should request:

PPU: 834 (Personnel Security Investigation File), 818 (Personal Information File), 836 (Unit Military Personnel Bank), 831 (Grievance File), 824 (Department of National Defence and Veterans Affairs Canada Centre for the Support of Injured and Retired Members and their Families), 817 (Canadian Forces Casualty Database), 810 (Medical Records), 811 (Dental Records), 859 (Pension File), 858 (Pay Records File), 805 (Human Resources Management Information System), 829 (DSSPM - Clothing Online). Indicate for which period, from to, of time you are requesting the information. For DND it should be the initial time you went to the recrutment centre to a current date or date of release.
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***Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Online Request***

Please click here to process your claim online: https://atip-aiprp.apps.gc.ca/atip/welcome.do


For VAC you should request:

PPU: 055 (Pensions and Compensation), 560 (Disability Awards, Death Benefit and Detention Benefit), 030 (Treatment of a Pensioned/Awarded Condition), 550 (Rehabilitation Services and Vocational Assistance), 010 (Educational Assistance), 056 (Veterans Independence Program), 016 (Residential Care), 520 (Health Benefits Program/Public Service Health Care Plan), 020 (Health Care Programs Non-pension Related), 080 (Reviews & Appeals) and 090 (Bureau of Pensions Advocates) and All Services All Summary Assessment. Indicate for which period, from to, of time you are requesting the information. For VAc it should be the initial time you filed a pension application or you had any dealing with VAC.

For DND you should request:

PPU: 834 (Personnel Security Investigation File), 818 (Personal Information File), 836 (Unit Military Personnel Bank), 831 (Grievance File), 824 (Department of National Defence and Veterans Affairs Canada Centre for the Support of Injured and Retired Members and their Families), 817 (Canadian Forces Casualty Database), 810 (Medical Records), 811 (Dental Records), 859 (Pension File), 858 (Pay Records File), 805 (Human Resources Management Information System), 829 (DSSPM - Clothing Online). Indicate for which period, from to, of time you are requesting the information. For DND it should be the initial time you went to the recrutment centre to a current date or date of release.
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Defence Watch / Suspect sought in sexual assault at Algonquin College
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 24, 2018, 03:18:20 AM »
Suspect sought in sexual assault at Algonquin College

A woman in her 20s was sexually assaulted as she slept in an Algonquin College lounge early on Oct. 14. Police are now asking the public to help them identify a suspect who was captured on surveillance cameras coming from a nearby OC Transpo station and walking the hallways of the building. Patrol officers were […]

A woman in her 20s was sexually assaulted as she slept in an Algonquin College lounge early on Oct. 14.


Police are now asking the public to help them identify a suspect who was captured on surveillance cameras coming from a nearby OC Transpo station and walking the hallways of the building.


Patrol officers were called to the Woodroffe Avenue campus at 3:40 a.m.


The suspect is described as white, in his late 20s or early 30s with a slim, fit build. He was wearing an orange baseball cap with a small black logo on the front, a dark jacket, white T-shirt and light blue jeans.


Ruth Dunley, a spokeswoman for Algonquin College, said the school routinely has “security patrols in that area and security has increased their vigilance in this area since the incident.”


Students, however, were not notified of the reported sexual assault by the school itself, she said. The college only informs students when it believes there is an “imminent threat” to the school population or campus. The college is co-operating with the police investigation and is taking direction from police.


Related



Anyone with information is asked to call West Criminal Investigations at 613-236-1222 ext. 2666. Anonymous tips can be made to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or by downloading the Ottawa Police app.


Source: Suspect sought in sexual assault at Algonquin College
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Focus Afghanistan / Alim Qasimov Ensemble
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 23, 2018, 02:11:50 AM »
Alim Qasimov Ensemble

Alim Qasimov and his daughter Fargana exemplify the explosive artistic energy that results when a powerful musical model ignites the spark of young talent. Fargana Qasimova’s talent gravitated toward the music she heard from her father: Azerbaijani classical music, known as mugham, and the repertoire of bardic songs sung by ashiqs, modern-day troubadours and singer-songwriters.


The Qasimovs are accompanied by a quartet of young musicians whose talent was shaped both by formal music education and immersion in Azerbaijani oral tradition.


Alim Qasimov vocal, daf | Fargana Qasimova vocal, daf | Rauf Islamov kamanche | Zaki Valiyev tar | Rafael Asgarov balaban, clarinette | Javidan Nabiyev naghara


Alim Qasimov and his daughter Fragana
Alim Qasimov Ensemble
Name of AKMI School/Country: 
Azerbaijan

Source: Alim Qasimov Ensemble
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