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Defence Watch / Rain might dampen your weekend plans
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on June 23, 2018, 06:00:26 PM »
Rain might dampen your weekend plans

You’re going to want to pack an umbrella and rain jacket if you plan on spending any time at the numerous outdoor festivals this weekend. The forecast calls for cloudy skies and a 60 per cent chance of rain showers for Saturday, with a predicted high of 21 C. Your chances are better of staying […]

You’re going to want to pack an umbrella and rain jacket if you plan on spending any time at the numerous outdoor festivals this weekend.


The forecast calls for cloudy skies and a 60 per cent chance of rain showers for Saturday, with a predicted high of 21 C.


Your chances are better of staying dry on Saturday night with only a 40 per cent chance of rain. The low will be 15 C.


Sunday is a little better with cloudy skies and no rain in the forecast until Sunday evening, when there is a 40 per cent chance of showers. The high will be 21 C, with a low of 12 C.


The start of the week looks much better with a mix of sun and cloud on Monday and a high of 25 C. Tuesday is sunny and 25 C.


Source: Rain might dampen your weekend plans
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Whitcomb: Climate change politics are undermining federalism

Canada’s largest province is about to reject the federal climate change policy.  Saskatchewan never accepted it and Alberta could reject it in 2019. Maybe it’s time for reflection. The current policy calls for the provinces to implement a federal government plan. That, however, is a contradiction of federalism, a system which reflects the fact that […]

Canada’s largest province is about to reject the federal climate change policy.  Saskatchewan never accepted it and Alberta could reject it in 2019. Maybe it’s time for reflection.


The current policy calls for the provinces to implement a federal government plan. That, however, is a contradiction of federalism, a system which reflects the fact that the feds and the provinces have different interests. Policies to deal with pollution in Ontario may be inappropriate for Newfoundland or Saskatchewan. The current federal government overlooked such differences when it decided that there was only one solution to global warming, a carbon tax, and only two acceptable ways to implement it, cap-and-trade or a carbon levy. Unfortunately, not all Canadians and provinces accept these assumptions, and the consensus is shrinking.


In 2015, Saskatchewan’s then-premier Brad Wall pointed out that his economy was far more dependent on fossil fuels than were other provinces. A carbon tax would be disproportionately costly, which was unacceptable. That dispute is going to court and no one knows what the outcome will be.


Alberta’s NDP government endorsed the federal scheme, providing the federal government got a pipeline built. That linked dealing with climate change to increasing energy production, linked reducing gas emissions to raising them. But the pipeline has not been built, and bitumen is unlikely to flow before a provincial election which could empower the United Conservative Party. The UCP is strongly opposed to the federal climate plan. It, and the incoming Ontario Conservative government, oppose carbon taxes because everyone will pay them whether or not that reduces their consumption of carbon. The two parties believe governments always spend any money that is available (and in fact Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario have not returned all their carbon tax revenue to taxpayers).


In challenging Ontario’s upcoming withdrawal from cap-and-trade, the federal government is introducing a new and very dangerous interpretation of federalism. No one questioned that Ontario’s program was within its jurisdiction. Now the federal government is saying that if Ontario repeals its own law, it will be replaced by the imposition of a federal tax exclusively within Ontario’s borders. In effect it will be a “provincial” tax, not a “national” or “federal” one applied to all Canadians.


But the federal government has no mandate to force Ontario to retain one of its own programs if its government wants to repeal it. In effect, the federal level is trying to use its taxation power to make the environment an exclusive federal responsibility.


The courts might uphold the federal government’s right to collect such a tax but the political battle could be fatal. If it can prevent Doug Ford repealing an existing Ontario law, then it can prevent other provinces repealing other provincial laws. In that case, there is no federalism, no division of power, and no independent provincial jurisdiction. Quebec could not repeal its cap-and-trade law – just the threat the separatists need to rise from their death-bed.


The federal government can forge ahead with a series of political and court battles, or it can go back to the drawing board, in which case there seem to be two options. One is co-operative federalism – namely, call a heads-of-government meeting and confirm Canada’s Paris goals; each provinces’ share of those goals; the federal right to implement policies within its jurisdiction; each province’s right to implement their own policies as they wish; and confirm that they will all co-operate to avoid duplication or contradictory policies.


The second option is for the federal government to raise its existing national carbon tax on gasoline and other forms of fossil fuel. It has full constitutional power to do so, can do it any time, the revenue can be returned to taxpayers, and it could be completely transparent. Actually, if it had done this in 2016, Canada would already be on the way to meeting its Paris goals, rather than locked in an increasingly ugly and unnecessary federal-provincial, regional, political and ideological battle.


It’s not too late to get it right but that does mean going back to the drawing board.


Ed Whitcomb is the author of Rivals for Power: Ottawa and the Provinces, the contentious history of the Canadian federation, and of short histories of all 10 provinces.


 


Source: Whitcomb: Climate change politics are undermining federalism
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Costs of hearing-related health claims on the rise in Canadian military

Richard Blanchette, a retired major-general who suffered hearing loss during his years of service, said the Department of National Defence does everything in its power to protect members and it's the responsibility of the members to do their part.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/military-hearing-loss-members-reluctant-to-wear-protection-1.4711517
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Arson squad probes Monday's two-alarm fire near Ashton

Police arson investigators are probing a two-alarm fire that broke out in an agricultural silo near Ashton Monday. The Ottawa Police Services unit reported that the fire is suspicious. Firefighters got multiple 911 calls reporting the structure at 1525 Ashton Station Rd. was in flames, Ottawa Fire Services said at 6 a.m. Monday as they were […]

Police arson investigators are probing a two-alarm fire that broke out in an agricultural silo near Ashton Monday.


The Ottawa Police Services unit reported that the fire is suspicious.


Firefighters got multiple 911 calls reporting the structure at 1525 Ashton Station Rd. was in flames, Ottawa Fire Services said at 6 a.m. Monday as they were still fighting the flames.


Spotting smoke as they traveled to the scene, crews from Station 46 had declared a working fire and broadcast a second alarm soon after.


The structure, which partially collapsed, was unoccupied and no one was hurt.


District 8 Chief Todd Horricks captured dramatic video of the structure in flames from top to bottom and billowing thick black smoke. He thanked the Carleton Place-based Ocean Wave Fire Company and Beckwith Fire Department for pitching in.





Source: Arson squad probes Monday's two-alarm fire near Ashton
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A sneak peek at the relocation of the House of Commons to West Block

While Centre Block undergoes extensive renovations, MPs will move to the West Block in January 2019 to meet in a new interim House of Commons constructed within the rectangular interior courtyard of the edifice. It’s a 19th-century structure that pre-dates Confederation and was built long before modern building codes. Video by Wayne Cuddington

While Centre Block undergoes extensive renovations, MPs will move to the West Block in January 2019 to meet in a new interim House of Commons constructed within the rectangular interior courtyard of the edifice. It’s a 19th-century structure that pre-dates Confederation and was built long before modern building codes.


Video by Wayne Cuddington


Source: A sneak peek at the relocation of the House of Commons to West Block
6
At this Ontario farm, Canadian veterans are taking control over their own healing
‘Broken’ after his discharge from the army, ex-paratrooper Eric Coupal founded the Quartz Ridge Sanctuary, near Sudbury, to help his fellow vets

https://tvo.org/article/current-affairs/at-this-ontario-farm-canadian-veterans-are-taking-control-over-their-own-healing
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Today's letters: What went right at the G7, supply management, free speech

One thing at least, went right at the G7 meeting, a letter-writer explains. You can write to us too, on any topic, at letters@ottawacitizen.com

Another reason for national pride


Re: Donald Trump disrupts G7 women’s empowerment session by showing up late, June 9.


Donald Trump’s insults continue to feed the news cycle, many days after the G7 Summit, and seem to have built a movement of all-party national pride in Canada. But where true political courage was shown was not only in standing up to our bullying neighbour but in making sure he would not derail the important multilateral work of the G7.


Thus, in the middle of the Charlevoix drama, the Canadian delegation was able to shepherd the adoption of the $3.8-billion program to provide education to millions of girls in situations of crisis (civil strife, natural disasters etc.). The feat may not have received much media attention but it will bear fruit for an entire generation, starting with the desperate Rohingya refugees from Myanmar stuck on the southern border of Bangladesh.


That, too, is worthy of our national pride.


Jean-François Tardif, Gatineau


Spin from the supply-management cartel


Re: Food producers’ pop-up ‘diner’ has pull on politicians, June 13.


Oh, the irony. On the very day MP Maxime Bernier is fired from the Conservative caucus for telling the truth about supply management – which is that it’s a cartel that benefits multi-million-dollar agribusinesses while overpricing dairy products and disproportionately hurting poor Canadians – the same cartel hosts a Sparks Street propaganda “diner.” Naturally, it attracts the politicians whose campaigns are bolstered by the cartel. And your reporter writes that “a poll last summer found three-quarters of Canadians support supply management.” Any guesses as to who provided those results?


Bruce Annan, Ottawa


A better way to use lottery money


Lotto Max has recently given us another winner of a $60-million jackpot. To allow this is all very strange because Lotto Max is operated in Ontario by a Crown Corporation for a government that is trying to distribute wealth more equitably. Surely it is out of sync to take money from the poor to create a multi-millionaire or two.


Is it ever sensible to give $60 million to a stranger? It certainly has nothing to do with need, and when you consider the three million Canadians who are struggling to pay last week’s rent, such an act could be called immoral.


Wouldn’t it be more sensible to do away with the jackpot and divide the money into $1-million lots? Within one year, hundreds of Canadians would be freed from the pall of poverty, and the skies would ring with praise for Lotto Max!


John E. Rutherford, Gatineau


Now it’s about free speech, too


After a campaign leaving many wondering what policies he would implement, Doug Ford has taken to Twitter to announce his first policy decision. Contradicting his campaign slogans of protecting free speech, he has stated that he will use his power to ban the annual Al-Quds protest “anywhere in the province.”


This violation of the Charter is unconvincingly branded as fighting hate speech. But hate speech is already illegal in Canada and if anyone at the Al-Quds rally were committing this crime, they could be arrested and charged. None has been. A backdoor attempt to stop them is being made by abusing the legislative system


A call to halt a legal assembly of persons whose message jars your tranquility, under the cynical guise of pre-emptively stopping potential hate speech laws violations of which there is no precedent, is an assault on Canadian democracy. Next year, we will march for two reasons.


Jarrah Elhalabi, Ottawa


The kindness of strangers


My heartfelt thanks to the young man who called 911 for me, and the four women – one with a carton of orange juice – who came to my aid on Clemow Avenue when my husband lost consciousness due to a diabetic condition.


He has recovered and these acts reaffirm my belief in offering help when it is needed.


Carol Scharf, Kanata


 


Source: Today's letters: What went right at the G7, supply management, free speech
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Military transition system failing veterans, Senate subcommittee finds June 13th 2018
Un sous-comité sénatorial constate que le systčme de transition vers la vie civile abandonne les anciens combattants
https://sencanada.ca/en/newsroom/veac-military-transition-system-failing-veterans/?utm_source=eblast&utm_campaign=VEAC&utm_content=soldier-to-civilian&cmp=1&utm_medium=HTMLEmail
9
Focus Afghanistan / The Aga Khan Museum in Canada
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on June 13, 2018, 11:00:07 AM »
The Aga Khan Museum in Canada


Source: The Aga Khan Museum in Canada
10
Council decision on Château Laurier addition will be based on rules, not feelings

Ottawa city council’s decision on the controversial Château Laurier addition will come down to how the proposal stacks up against the rules, not the feelings of average citizens. Coun. Tobi Nussbaum, chair of the built-heritage subcommittee, said the city’s challenge is making sure the public understands the frame through which the decision-making bodies need to […]

Ottawa city council’s decision on the controversial Château Laurier addition will come down to how the proposal stacks up against the rules, not the feelings of average citizens.


Coun. Tobi Nussbaum, chair of the built-heritage subcommittee, said the city’s challenge is making sure the public understands the frame through which the decision-making bodies need to view the application.


“We’re not judging it on the basis of what we like or not,” Nussbaum said Tuesday, not indicating either way how he’ll vote on the application.


There are two set of guidelines at play: the 1964 Venice Charter developed by the International Council on Monuments and Sites and the city-adopted Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada by Parks Canada.


The Venice Charter calls for additions, if they’re allowed, to not detract from the interesting parts of the heritage building.


But it’s the Parks Canada standards and guidelines, which council has used in heritage matters, that are at the root of the debate over the hotel’s addition. Those rules call for making new elements compatible, but distinguishable, from the heritage building and ensuring there’s a clear distinction between what’s new and what’s old.


Related



City heritage staff have concluded the hotel addition passes both tests and now it’s up to politicians to either agree or disagree. The city can’t dictate the architectural style of a proposed development.


Parks Canada, the steward of the Rideau Canal and the vistas, has no objections to the application.


The city’s built-heritage subcommittee will consider the matter Monday.


“Our key job at the meeting is to evaluate the application on the appropriate standards and guidelines,” Nussbaum said. “I’m going to benefit, too, from the discussion we have at committee.”


The recommendation from the built-heritage subcommittee will be sent to council’s planning committee.


Larco Investments, the owner of the Château Laurier, wants to build a seven-storey contemporary addition, replacing the parking structure currently under demolition.


The Grand Trunk Railway Company built the Château Laurier in two phases starting in 1908. The old city of Ottawa granted the hotel heritage protection in 1978.


Coun. Jan Harder, chair of the planning committee, which will ultimately send a recommendation to council, said she likes the look of the latest concept of the addition. She lauded the hotel’s plan to increase public access to the building and a new interior courtyard from a terrace near the canal.


“I’ve certainly paid close attention to the evolution of the designs from the beginning to where we are today,” Harder said.


“I’m puzzled by the reaction at sort of the last-minute by Heritage Ottawa because they were part of the sponsor group that was looking at it and it was collaborative. There was a trigger there that changed that.”


Heritage Ottawa has slammed the design as being incompatible with the hotel.


The design process has lasted a year-and-a-half and included four versions. The heritage working group of city staff, federal representatives and architects, along with city’s urban design review panel, helped advise Larco.


Harder said the new addition won’t encumber views to the historic hotel. She likes that Larco’s architects have added more limestone to the design. According to Harder, the National Capital Commission is insisting that all the trees remain on the northern edge of the property at Major’s Hill Park.


“I like the openness of it. Remember, until recently it was a parking garage and not a nice one. I’m not saying we should let them off on not having good design. I think this is good design,” Harder said.


“I think that ideally if most people had their wish it would be, just extend the Château Laurier exactly as it is. It would be easy, but I don’t think it would be the right way to go.”


Rideau Coun. Mathieu Fleury, who represents the ward, said there should be more discussion about the “replica policy” that prevents additions from mimicking the heritage building.


“There are unique contexts and this is one,” Fleury said. “We should have considered the impact of the policy right off the bat.”


The built-heritage subcommittee on Monday and planning committee on June 26 will invite public delegates to share their opinions. City council is scheduled to hold a final vote on June 27.


The NCC’s board of directors will eventually make its own decision on the design during the federal approval process. The NCC said the application could go to the board in September.


jwilling@postmedia.com


twitter.com/JonathanWilling


Source: Council decision on Château Laurier addition will be based on rules, not feelings
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