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Focus Afghanistan / Aga Khan Development Network brochure
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 22, 2018, 02:00:31 PM »
Aga Khan Development Network brochure

The Aga Khan Development Network is a group of private, international, non-denominational agencies working to improve living conditions and opportunities for people in specific regions of the developing world. The Network’s organisations have individual mandates that range from the fi elds of health and education to architecture, rural development and the promotion of private-sector enterprise. Together they collaborate in working towards a common goal – to build institutions and programmes that can respond to the challenges of social, economic and cultural change on an ongoing basis. This brochure introduces the Network’s principal agencies and provides an overview of their activities and goals. This publication is also available in French, Arabic and Portuguese.



Source: Aga Khan Development Network brochure
12
Forecast: Chance of flurries and gusty winds, flurries and showers for Monday

The good news is that the oppressive heat of the summer has left the building for good, it seems. The only humidity will be in the form of showers, and possible flurries over the next few days. Environment Canada is saying that Sunday will be mainly cloudy, with a 30 per cent chance of flurries […]

The good news is that the oppressive heat of the summer has left the building for good, it seems. The only humidity will be in the form of showers, and possible flurries over the next few days.


Environment Canada is saying that Sunday will be mainly cloudy, with a 30 per cent chance of flurries in the morning. The strong winds of the past few days will continue to be out of the northwest at 30 km/h gusting to 50. The high of 3 C is quite a bit under the average for this date of 11 C.  The wind chill will feel like -8 C in the morning, and a low UV index of 2.


This evening will be partly cloudy, becoming cloudy near midnight. The low should be -1 C, with a windchill of -5.


The prediction for Monday, election day,  is for a 70 per cent chance of flurries changing to a 70 per cent chance of showers in the afternoon in a high of 6 C.


If you’re noticing diminishing daylight, you’d be right. The sunrise is 7:26 a.m. and the sun sets at 6:08 p.m. today.


 


Source: Forecast: Chance of flurries and gusty winds, flurries and showers for Monday
13
Defence Watch / Police seek help finding bank holdup suspect
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 19, 2018, 09:14:11 PM »
Police seek help finding bank holdup suspect

Ottawa police are seeking public assistance in locating a suspect in an Oct. 9 bank holdup. In a news release Friday, police said the suspect entered a bank in the 2400 block of Bank Street, near South Keys Shopping Centre, and presented a teller with a note demanding cash. The suspect is described as a […]

Ottawa police are seeking public assistance in locating a suspect in an Oct. 9 bank holdup.


In a news release Friday, police said the suspect entered a bank in the 2400 block of Bank Street, near South Keys Shopping Centre, and presented a teller with a note demanding cash.


The suspect is described as a light-skinned black man 18-20 years of age, about five feet eight inches (173 cm) tall and with a thin build.


At the time of the holdup, he wore a black sweatshirt with the hood pulled tightly around his face, dark pants and black running shoes.


Anyone with information is asked to call Ottawa police robbery unit at 613-236-1222, ext. 5116. Anonymous tips can be made to Crime Stoppers toll-free at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or by downloading the Ottawa police app.


Source: Police seek help finding bank holdup suspect
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One arrest as Gatineau police recover property stolen in post-tornado break-ins

Gatineau police have recovered a number of items that are believed to have been looted from homes hit by the tornadoes that touched down on September 21. Police began the investigation after a resident lodged a complaint Oct. 13, claiming they had been the victim of a break-in at 35 Tassé St. In the following […]

Gatineau police have recovered a number of items that are believed to have been looted from homes hit by the tornadoes that touched down on September 21.


Police began the investigation after a resident lodged a complaint Oct. 13, claiming they had been the victim of a break-in at 35 Tassé St. In the following days, the complainant called back and reported that they had found many of the items that were allegedly stolen on an web-based classified site.


Police raided a residence on Lucien-Brault Street where they found some of the items from the original complainant, as well as a variety of items that they believe were stolen from the Mont Bleu area affected by the tornado.


Three people were taken into custody but two were released without charges.


The third individual was released with a promise to appear in court and will face charges.


Police also seized several items and are warning people who may have had items stolen during the tornado, that they may be contacted by police in the coming days to identify property that was reported stolen.


An investigation into the incident is still ongoing.


Police ask anyone with information to contact them at 819-246-0222.


Source: One arrest as Gatineau police recover property stolen in post-tornado break-ins
15
More than 56,000 people in Ottawa have voted ahead of the Oct. 22 municipal election

More than 56,000 people have voted in special polls and the traditional advance poll ahead of the Ottawa municipal election next Monday, providing some optimism for a better voter turnout than 2014. According to the city’s elections office, 41,163 people cast ballots on the advance voting day last Friday. Combined with the 15,754 people who […]

More than 56,000 people have voted in special polls and the traditional advance poll ahead of the Ottawa municipal election next Monday, providing some optimism for a better voter turnout than 2014.


According to the city’s elections office, 41,163 people cast ballots on the advance voting day last Friday.


Combined with the 15,754 people who voted over four days of special advance polls, there have been 56,917 people who have cast ballots so far in Ottawa’s municipal election.


A week before the 2014 election, 46,971 people had voted at special polls or the advance poll. There were three days of special advanced voting in 2014, in addition to the traditional advance voting.


The total voter turnout for the 2014 municipal election was 39.92 per cent.


The city has tried to increase opportunities for residents to vote in the municipal election by adding more advance polls in recent elections.


In one week, voters will go to the polls to elect a mayor and 23 councillors for a four-year term. People can also vote for a school board trustee for a four-year term.


On voting day Monday, polls will be open between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. Anyone who doesn’t know where to vote can check on the city’s online Where Do I Vote? tool.


The winning candidates will take office on Dec. 1, 2018. The term ends on Nov. 14, 2022.


jwilling@postmedia.com


twitter.com/JonathanWilling


Source: More than 56,000 people in Ottawa have voted ahead of the Oct. 22 municipal election
16
Manotick couple's dog falls ill from suspected pot toxicity

A Manotick couple is warning other dog owners after their Golden Retriever fell ill with frightening symptoms that fit the warning signs of cannabis exposure. Jeff and Margaret Rowe were walking Annie in the area of Bracken Field at about 4:30 p.m. Sunday, when Annie seemed to nose and then eat something before they could […]

A Manotick couple is warning other dog owners after their Golden Retriever fell ill with frightening symptoms that fit the warning signs of cannabis exposure.


Jeff and Margaret Rowe were walking Annie in the area of Bracken Field at about 4:30 p.m. Sunday, when Annie seemed to nose and then eat something before they could stop her.


By 6:15 p.m. Rowe and his wife, a physician, could tell that something was wrong with the dog they’ve had since she was a 10-week-old puppy. When she couldn’t stand or respond, the couple rushed Annie to an emergency veterinary hospital.


Vets kept for the dog for observation and monitored her vital signs until late Sunday night. By Monday morning, Annie ran in circles as if being chased before collapsing. She wasn’t back to normal until later that afternoon.


Rowe wonders if a smaller breed would have survived the episode, which he links to a wad of a tar-like substance with plant matter in it he says he later found in the park and turned over to authorities.


With recreational marijuana being made legal starting Wednesday and “edibles” on the horizon, Rowe says he wants other pet owners to be cautious and for users to safely consume and dispose of substances.


Earlier this month, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association issued a warning that “the likelihood of your pet becoming exposed will increase as cannabis becomes more widely available.”


This week, the association issued a primer for pet owners outlining the signs of exposure, including wobbling, agitation, dilated pupils and inappropriate urination, salivating, vomiting, fast or slow heart rates and low body temperatures. They start within an hour or two of ingestion and may resolve within a day.


At high doses, seizures, comas and death can occur.


Since the scare with Annie, Rowe has written to city officials and alerted nearby dog owners and residents.


“The message is that this stuff is dangerous to animals,” he said. “With using it comes the responsibility of handling (it) in an intelligent way.”


In a media release Wednesday, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association pointed to a 2012 study showing a four-fold increase in cannabis toxicities in dogs between 2010 and 2015 in Colorado, where a 2012 referendum legalized pot.


The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ poison control centre reported that there were more cases of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) poisoning even in states where it was illegal as cannabis use became more acceptable.


Decades-old studies show that dogs are proportionately more sensitive to THC than humans with small dogs most susceptible. Cats aren’t immune, but, as the vets note, they don’t typically scavenge and lack a sweet tooth like dogs.


Tim Arthur, an Ottawa vet with a background in emergency medicine and the Ontario representative for the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Council, says experienced vets have likely already treated dogs for cannabis toxicity.


“It’s out there, it’s not new,” Arthur said. “Our worry is it’s going to get more common as, theoretically, the substance becomes more available.


“What, hopefully, will come up, is people will be forthcoming to say this is what it is.”


If you suspect your pet has consumed cannabis, call ahead to warn the vet that you’re coming in and explain why so they can prepare, Arthur said.


While treatment is most often “wait and see,” vets can, in some instances, induce vomiting, pump an animal’s stomach or even use injections to bind THC in the bloodstream.


The veterinary association acknowledges that dog deaths from cannabis have been rarely reported, citing only a 2012 report of two dogs dying from eating butter containing medical-grade THC.


For concerned pet owners, home cannabis safety is simple: keep it out of reach, just like chocolate or medications, Arthur said. Pet owners who smoke cannabis should do so outside, he said.


For dog owners, keeping pets safe outside is trickier.


“Unfortunately, you’re the owner of a scavenger, a scrounger, and something with a really, really good sense of smell,” Arthur said. “Your ability to stop them from consuming this sort of thing is the same as your ability to stop them from taking in the pizza crust…


“If you’re out and suspicious something has happened, off to the veterinarian.”


Source: Manotick couple's dog falls ill from suspected pot toxicity
17
Defence Watch / ARMCHAIR MAYOR: One way to rediscover Sparks Street
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 11, 2018, 10:18:21 AM »
ARMCHAIR MAYOR: One way to rediscover Sparks Street

On Oct. 22, citizens of Ottawa elect a new city council. To help guide discussion, we’ve asked people for ONE idea that would make the city a better place – without necessarily breaking the bank. Today, musician Thomas Brawn, a flute busker on Sparks Street since 1978, touts an informative app for visitors to the city’s […]

On Oct. 22, citizens of Ottawa elect a new city council. To help guide discussion, we’ve asked people for ONE idea that would make the city a better place – without necessarily breaking the bank. Today, musician Thomas Brawn, a flute busker on Sparks Street since 1978, touts an informative app for visitors to the city’s most historic thoroughfare.



Perhaps it is some deep inner connection with history that drew me into the world of classical music performance, but from my childhood’s musical beginnings in Port Colborne and Sarnia, I landed at the University Ottawa to study concert flute in the mid-1970s. I wanted to play in an orchestra.


I tried busking on Ottawa’s famous Sparks Street on a lark one hot summer’s day in 1978 – a gem of a discovery. I could actually practise my art and earn some serious coin. I also made valuable contacts, some which continue to pay off to this day. Further, I was now free to relax and enjoy this city. I have “always found” the old buildings with their carved stone accents interesting.


As a classical flute student and now a professional flutist who has played in opera, symphony, recording and recital (as well as literally thousands of casual chamber music jobs), I have been immersed daily in the histories left by the likes of J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and others. No surprise that, busking on Sparks Street, I would also be constantly curious about its architectural and social history too.


For instance, Nicholas Sparks: Like, who was that guy? And what about J.L. Orme & Sons, on Sparks in the 1860s? I own a vintage wooden flute and two piccolos sold at their store in 1867. Walking down Sparks today, you’d not find out about these people.


Meanwhile, look up, way up, to the carved stone gargoyles, lions, panels, statues, medallions and busts to be seen on many buildings on Ottawa’s oldest business street. 


The fierce lions that guard the entrance to Canada Post at Elgin and Sparks: Who were their craftsmen? Who commissioned them? And, by the way, just who were Metcalfe and O’Connor?


Riding the crest of 63 Sparks is a stone sculpture of a woman with an anchor at her feet. I have no idea what’s she’s about, but I’d like to know. Now pan down a floor …”Bible House”: What’s the story there?


65 Sparks is a vintage painted brick building with original street level facings with beautifully arched windows higher up, but of different styles and designs as you go up in floors. Were they built at the same time? And what was the original colour of the now hidden brick?


At the northwest corner of Sparks at Metcalfe, an edifice boasts stone carving galore. There are, for instance, five busts of bearded men. Two of them, one smiling and one not, are missing their moustaches. Story, please, story!


As we stroll west on Sparks to O’Connor, we gaze up at a world of banks with Greek columns and carved sculptures, panels and medallions depicting I know not what. And across from the Bank of Nova Scotia, the Hardy Arcade … former home of “Le Groupe de la Place Royale” and “Morrow’s Nut House” and the world’s best maple walnut ice cream. Who was Hardy?


I really want to know, and my four decades of tooting and interacting with the world’s tourists tell me they would like to know as well.


So, I propose that the City of Ottawa create an app for tablets and smartphones which would relate, detail and animate the architectural, historical and social history of any Sparks Street address you might enter. This information and animation would come courtesy of The Ottawa Historical Society, Public Archives, The Museum of Canadian History and the former Ottawa Journal and current Ottawa Citizen.


The app would be multilingual, to serve the myriad of countries our tourists come from. Fund the app with pop-up ads featuring stores and services nearby. List nearby information kiosks, public potties, telephones, defibrillators. The app would not only help in tourism before, during and following trips, but would be an educational platform for schools. It might also remind you of other gems nearby.


The “Ottawapp” would be a translatable platform; next, we could work on an app for the ByWard Market, whose grand old buildings also suffer from ground-level modernist muffling. Ottawapp could be franchised to jurisdictions everywhere.



Source: ARMCHAIR MAYOR: One way to rediscover Sparks Street

18
Defence Watch / Warm but cloudy for the next few days
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on October 09, 2018, 07:12:44 AM »
Warm but cloudy for the next few days

Today will be mainly cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers and risk of thunderstorms. Moderate winds will taper off towards the evening. The high will be a seasonal 13 C. For Tuesday, there will only be a 30% chance of showers with possible thunderstorms in the afternoon, but it will be unseasonably warm with […]

Today will be mainly cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers and risk of thunderstorms.


Moderate winds will taper off towards the evening.


The high will be a seasonal 13 C.


For Tuesday, there will only be a 30% chance of showers with possible thunderstorms in the afternoon, but it will be unseasonably warm with a forecast high of 26 C.


On Wednesday, the mixed bag of weather continues with sun and cloud wrestling over ownership of the sky, 40% chance of rain and a high of 20 C.


The overnight low will be a cool 5 C.


Source: Warm but cloudy for the next few days
19
Brockville police seize weapons, drugs in biker gang raid

BROCKVILLE — Police have arrested two men and are looking for four other people in connection with drug and weapons offences with biker gang links following a raid last week. In a news release Friday, police said officers from Brockville, Kingston and the OPP’s biker enforcement unit raided a Brockville residence Sept. 27. They found […]

BROCKVILLE — Police have arrested two men and are looking for four other people in connection with drug and weapons offences with biker gang links following a raid last week.


In a news release Friday, police said officers from Brockville, Kingston and the OPP’s biker enforcement unit raided a Brockville residence Sept. 27.


They found firearms, other weapons, controlled substances and vests belonging to “Dead Eyes MC” which police described as “a support club to the Outlaws Motorcycle Club.”


Police also seized a vest belonging to the Outlaws Motorcycle Club.


Police did not identify the nature or quantity of the “controlled substances.”


Kyle Justin Thomas Gard, 23, and Adam James Sayeau, 27, both of Brockville, were held for a bail hearing scheduled for Friday, while four other people remained at large as of Friday afternoon.


Police said arrest warrants have been issued for Joshua Leonardo Dominguez, 36, of Ottawa; Allan Michael Eldon Neal, 24, of Brockville; Brooklyn Ann Lachappelle, 18, of Brockville; and Sarah Melissa Buttle, 25, also of Brockville.


All are jointly charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance; possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose, unauthorized possession of a firearm; unauthorized possession of a prohibited device; knowledge of unauthorized possession of a firearm; possession of a firearm obtained by crime; careless storage of a firearm; and possession of property obtained by crime.


 


Source: Brockville police seize weapons, drugs in biker gang raid
20
Months after house destroyed, Barrhaven fire victim 'just wants to go home'

From the window of her rental unit, Vicky Earl can almost see the burnt-out shell of her home. It’s a daily reminder of the frustrating effort to rebuild after a devastating fire this past summer. The 63-year-old Barrhaven resident had to flee her townhouse in July when a neighbouring unit caught fire. She’s now renting a […]

From the window of her rental unit, Vicky Earl can almost see the burnt-out shell of her home. It’s a daily reminder of the frustrating effort to rebuild after a devastating fire this past summer.


The 63-year-old Barrhaven resident had to flee her townhouse in July when a neighbouring unit caught fire. She’s now renting a place about two blocks away and says while the fire was traumatic, the months-long uncertainty about when she can rebuild is arguably worse.


At the root of the problem is a dispute between her neighbour and his insurance company that has so far stymied plans to rebuild.


“I just want to go home,” Earl said. “They could have started rebuilding three-and-a-half weeks ago. But, until they get the house beside us dealt with, nothing will be done. I could have been home by Christmas.”


Earl’s home is Unit B of a four-unit row of townhouses on Claridge Drive. On July 12, a fire in Unit A caused about $1 million in damage and displaced 15 people living in the rowhouses. Three of the units, including Earl’s, are unfit to live in.


Fortunately, no one was hurt as a result of the fire.


The unit next door to Earl’s — where the fire is believed to have originated — was occupied by a pair of people who were renting the property. Earl has been told the pair did not have renters’ insurance and have walked away from the property to find another home.


The owner of the property has insurance but, according to Earl, there seems to be some question about whether the policy permitted the property to be rented.


“Rebuilding after an unexpected event such as this can certainly be a stressful and difficult time, that is why CAA Insurance is dedicated to handling claims with compassion, honesty, and fairness,” said Kaitlyn Furse, a spokeswoman for CAA, the insurance company that holds the policy on the home. “We cannot speak to the specifics … for privacy reasons, but I can tell you that it is currently under investigation and we are working diligently to come to a determination.”


The investigation by CAA is the main reason Earl, and a family in an adjoining unit, can’t begin to rebuild their homes and get on with their lives. While their insurance companies have come forward with assistance, including paying Earl’s rent while she remains displaced, they can’t begin construction until all of the residents’ insurance companies are on side.


The delay is causing further issues.


“Think about the amount of water that was poured in there by the fire crews. All that stuff is now rotting and creating mould,” Earl said. “The roofs have to be replaced. The back half of my house was a write off due to smoke and other damage. My home is gutted. There have been raccoons in there … I can’t do anything. I can’t go home until I get some help, and no one seems to want to help us.”


Barrhaven Coun. Jan Harder said she has held numerous discussions about the property with city staff to get things moving, but there is a process that must be followed so, as with any delays caused by insurance company investigations, all parties involved are playing a waiting game.


“I don’t blame any of them for being upset,” said Harder. “We are very aware of it and have handed it over to those who can effect change. I have total empathy for the people living on either side (of the unit in dispute).”


Frank Bidin, chief building official for the City of Ottawa, said the city cannot compel anyone to begin a rebuild following a fire. Bidin said city officials have been in contact with both the homeowner and CAA to expedite the process, but so far it hasn’t helped.


“While the City cannot comment on a specific case, in the case of a building comprised of multiple property owners that has been directly affected by a fire, the property owners often have different underwriters and are at different levels of readiness to rebuild. Building Code Services communicates with the underwriters in an effort to expedite reconstruction of the exterior elements of the building and all individual dwelling units,” he said in an emailed statement. “The city cannot compel or require the property owners to rebuild.”


Harder used the issue to highlight a bigger concern. With more builders turning to high density, multiple dwelling units, like townhouses and semi-detached buildings, in a bid to make houses more affordable, issues like this pose a problem that needs to be addressed.


“As we move into issues like affordable housing, a lot of affordable housing will be affordable because of the density,” said Harder. “You don’t know when you’re going to have a fire in your home. People need to have some autonomy over their property when it may be closely attached. There is more work to be done.”


Source: Months after house destroyed, Barrhaven fire victim 'just wants to go home'
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