Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 10
21
Heading west: Launch of Westwood in Stittsville is the latest signal of Ottawa’s booming west end

Westwood is a new west-end development that’s all about location, location, location — and timing, timing, timing. About halfway between Terry Fox Drive in Kanata and Stittsville Main Street in Stittsville, and tucked in behind the hustle and bustle of Hazeldean Road, Westwood benefits from a great location that’s both quiet and close to everything. […]

Westwood is a new west-end development that’s all about location, location, location — and timing, timing, timing.


About halfway between Terry Fox Drive in Kanata and Stittsville Main Street in Stittsville, and tucked in behind the hustle and bustle of Hazeldean Road, Westwood benefits from a great location that’s both quiet and close to everything.


It abuts the Trans Canada Trail (popular for walking, hiking and biking); it’s just down the road from the Goulbourn Recreation Complex; shopping and a wealth of amenities are within a five-minute drive; the area is dotted with schools and parks; and there’s quick access to both the Queensway and Canadian Tire Centre.


It’s community building that’s convenient, close and quiet — everything that families would want in a growing neighbourhood.


And it’s launching now because the west end is “booming like crazy,” says Deborah Denison, a sales rep for Tamarack Homes, one of three builders selling homes at Westwood. “There seems to be so many businesses and development percolating out here that it’s really drawing a lot of interest in the west end.”


The Hartland single by Tamarack comfortably fits four bedrooms and a laundry room on the second floor. The master includes an ensuite with separate shower and soaker tub.


Despite already having a community on the go nearby — Poole Creek on Maple Grove Road near Huntmar Road — Tamarack is launching Westwood this weekend just two weeks after launching yet another community in the area, EdenWylde.


All the activity comes down to circumstances and timing. Poole Creek is in the final phase for Tamarack and the builder will be offering different types of homes at EdenWylde and Westwood for the most part, at least for now. At EdenWylde, Tamarack is selling adult-lifestyle homes and some townhomes, while at Westwood it’s offering two-storey singles and towns.



Timing was also key for Richcraft, which is launching at Westwood this weekend as well.


Like Tamarack, Richcraft has two other communities it’s building close by — Fernbank Crossing right across the street and Bradley Commons just a few blocks away on Hazeldean Road. But Richcraft is almost sold out at Fernbank and is low on townhomes in particular at Bradley Commons. Being able to offer towns and singles at Westwood while it waits for future phases of Bradley Commons to be released made sense.


“We’re running out of townhomes specifically,” says Richcraft marketing manager Shawn Bellman, noting that there is enough interest in the area to open a new community. The builder has gathered more than 750 people on its waiting list for Westwood. “Overall, the demand in Kanata (and Stittsville) has been great.”


The third builder at Westwood is Claridge Homes, which chose to launch last spring, again, because of timing. Although Claridge was building at nearby Bridlewood Trails, it had only townhomes and no singles. Availability at Bridlewood Trails has since dwindled to just a few homes.


The Colvin by Claridge is a two-storey single on a 37-foot lot with a dramatic great room that’s open to the second floor. The home has four bedrooms and 2,465 square feet.


Claridge is the only builder to have a presence on the site so far, putting up a sales centre at the edge of a vast empty field that is now serviced so that home building can begin. (Richcraft is selling from Fernbank Crossing and Tamarack is selling from Poole Creek, in both cases because that’s where they already have model homes to see.)


Even though initial buyers could expect to wait more than a year to move into their homes, there has been much interest, says Sandra Morello, Claridge’s sales and marketing manager. “People love this area.”


Indeed, it was the area (and a recommendation in favour of Claridge) that prompted first-time home buyer Trevor Tynan to buy a Claridge single-family home this summer.


“I prefer the suburbs and the trail was a really, really enticing factor,” he says. Both he and his partner love to run and they liked that there are new schools planned for the community.


“We wanted a place where you could have a family, that you could grow into, in a community that I think will be fully robust” by the time he and his partner hope to have children. “As the kids get old enough, the community will be fully developed around it. And I prefer to only move once.”


First-time buyer Trevor Tynan chose Claridge’s Baker single for its open-concept main floor. ‘I just thought, we’re going to spend a lot of time right here … what a great space to have,’ he says.


Westwood is aptly named.  It’s on the western portion of the Fernbank Community and boasts a wooded area that will be maintained for a park. The Fernbank Community is a Community Design Plan that covers some 1,665 acres from Terry Fox to the east, Iber Road and Shea Road to the west, Hazeldean Road to the north and Fernbank Road to the south. It’s expected to have about 11,000 homes and 30,000 residents when completed.


The Westwood portion is about 400 acres along Robert Grant Avenue and Fernbank Road and will eventually include both an elementary and a high school, Morello says. There are 460 homes available between the three builders in this first phase — 300 singles and 160 townhomes.


All three builders have something new for Westwood. Claridge has released a new collection of singles called the Landmark Series, which features the option of a contemporary elevation and included items such as quartz counters, pot lights, separate tub and shower in the ensuite and soft-close cabinetry.


Richcraft is opening a new model home this weekend at the Fernbank Crossing sales centre to showcase its contemporary collaboration with architect Jason Flynn. Called the Cedarbreeze, the 44-foot single comes with either three or four bedrooms, a bright open-concept main floor and an unexpected foyer layout.


And Tamarack is planning to release a new townhome floor plan but did not have details available at the time of writing.


All three expect to have model homes built to coincide with the first occupancy dates, which range between summer and fall of 2019.


*******************


Here’s what each of the builders is offering:


 


Claridge


What: Townhomes, bungalows and two-storey singles on 37- and 45-foot lots


Prices: From $373,900 for a 1,620-square-foot townhome. All homes feature a finished lower level.


Sales centre: 1 Robert Grant Ave.


Hours: Monday to Wednesday, 1 to 8 p.m.; weekends noon to 5 p.m.


Information: claridgehomes.com; 613-617-0001


 


Richcraft


What: Townhomes and singles on lots ranging from 31 to 50 feet wide


Prices: Singles start from $475,900 and townhomes are starting from $394,900


Sales centre: 343 Haliburton Heights (Richcraft’s Fernbank Crossing location)


Hours: Monday to Thursday, noon to 8 p.m.; weekends and holidays, noon to 5:30 p.m. Closed Fridays.


Information: richcraft.com; 613-435-1183


 


Tamarack


What: Townhomes and singles on lots ranging from 38 to 45 feet wide


Prices: From $387,000 for a townhome


Sales centre: 1870 Maple Grove Rd. (Tamarack’s Poole Creek location)


Hours: Monday to Thursday, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.; weekends and holidays noon to 5 p.m. Closed Fridays.


Information: tamarackhomes.com; 613-831-1357


Source: Heading west: Launch of Westwood in Stittsville is the latest signal of Ottawa’s booming west end
22
Ottawa builders and renovators take top honours at OHBA awards gala

Ottawa housing industry companies dominated with their home renovation and architectural design prowess at the 2018 Ontario Home Builders’ Association Awards of Distinction Tuesday night. In addition to capturing an impressive six awards at the annual gala, held this year in the downtown Ottawa Shaw Centre, locals also swept the list of finalists for the […]

Ottawa housing industry companies dominated with their home renovation and architectural design prowess at the 2018 Ontario Home Builders’ Association Awards of Distinction Tuesday night.


In addition to capturing an impressive six awards at the annual gala, held this year in the downtown Ottawa Shaw Centre, locals also swept the list of finalists for the prestigious Ontario Renovator of the Year category.


Ottawa design-builder OakWood beat out fellow local finalists Amsted Design-Build and Lagois Design-Build-Renovate, bringing the trophy back to Ottawa after it went home with a Toronto company last year.


Since its creation in 2014 – when it was also won by OakWood – Ottawa companies have been crowned OHBA’s Renovator of the Year every year, save the last.


“OakWood is renowned for its technology-driven innovation,” the provincial industry association noted in a release.


Designing and building in Ottawa since 1956, the family-run business has embraced sustainability and energy efficiency through partnerships such as those with MPOWER Energy Solutions to install the Tesla Powerwall energy storage system, and with celebrity contractor Mike Holmes on high performance homes.


“It’s exhilarating,” said OakWood senior designer Deirdre Jorssen after picking up the team’s Renovator of the Year trophy.


“Being recognized in Ottawa before a provincial competition – it makes it even sweeter.”



Jason Burggraaf, executive director of the Greater Ottawa Home Builders’ Association observed at Tuesday’s gala that Ottawa “is in a real boom of renovators, from design to real ingenuity in terms of use of space.”


“A lot of Ottawa is turning around now,” he said. “The homes are getting older, those older established neighbourhoods … have to be revived, so those guys are kind of coming in and they’re putting some real thought and creativity into their designs.”


A record 511 entries were submitted to this year’s OHBA awards, which recognize excellence in home building, design, professional renovation, sales and marketing.


Twenty-two of the award finalists were Ottawa-based, and five local companies, including OakWood, managed to stand out from the packed field to take home awards for their bright, modern architectural designs and some striking room renovations.


Boutique design-build firm Art House Developments received the architectural design award for a custom home up to 3,000 square feet for a project on Vaughan Street, while the custom home between 3,001 and 5,000 square feet award went to veteran builder Larco Corp. for its “Canal Terrace House.”


Both local projects feature crisp, linear designs and light-filled, open-concept interiors.


“I think the way that it was designed on the lot, it’s got a spectacular view of the canal and Lansdowne, the orientation, the flow between the indoor and outdoor space, it just made it a very special project,” said Larco Corp. president Andrew Levitan.


Development firm Morley Hoppner took home a glass trophy for mid-rise building design with its “Schoolhouse Lofts.” These Hintonburg condos are housed in a renovated schoolhouse, and balance heritage character with contemporary design aesthetic.


In the renovation category, Ottawa companies claimed eight of the 15 finalist slots across five awards, and came away with two wins.


The bathroom renovation award was given to Amsted Design-Build for its “Ensuite Getaway,” an upgrade that transformed once-dreary shower and tub separates into a spacious, modern washroom.


OakWood also received its second award of the evening for a kitchen renovation.


The aptly-named “New Timeless” reno used simple upgrades to the room’s paint, backsplash, flooring and light fixtures to create a bright, versatile cooking and dining space in a monochrome colour palette.


Scott Massie, OakWood sales manager, said his company’s focus over the last year has included adding new members to the company team “to strengthen what we can bring and give to our customers.”


OakWood’s Orléans design centre has also been a significant part of the company’s continued growth, he noted. The state-of-the art space opened two years ago, and provides customers a one-stop-shop for renovation planning.


While the OHBA gala wrapped up late Tuesday for another year, it won’t be the last these local companies see of each other in 2018.


Many have made the list of finalists for the Greater Ottawa Home Builders’ Association Housing Design Awards. The winners will be announced at a Shaw Centre gala Oct. 20.


Source: Ottawa builders and renovators take top honours at OHBA awards gala
23
Defence Watch / Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on September 24, 2018, 01:09:19 PM »
Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday

Mixed but dry skies and a high of 16 C are forecast for Monday as the capital continues cleaning up after the storm, but get those tarps ready with rain in the forecast overnight. The overnight low is 10 C with increasing cloudiness and a few showers forecast to begin before morning then more showers […]

Mixed but dry skies and a high of 16 C are forecast for Monday as the capital continues cleaning up after the storm, but get those tarps ready with rain in the forecast overnight.


The overnight low is 10 C with increasing cloudiness and a few showers forecast to begin before morning then more showers Tuesday and a high of 18 C.


Overnight, there’s a 60 per cent chance of showers and a wildly unseasonal low of 18 C.


Wednesday is cloudy with a 60 per cent chance of showers, a high of 23 C and a low of 6 C.


A least of glimpse of sunshine is forecast for Thursday with mixed skies, a high of 18 C and low of 11 C.


For Friday, expect mixed skies, a 30 per cent chance of showers, high of 17 C and low of 7 C.


Saturday is more of the same with mixed skies, a high of 16 C and, overnight, a 30 per cent of showers and low of 7 C.


For Sunday, expect – you guessed it – mixed skies and a high of 14 C.


Source: Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday
24
Defence Watch / Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on September 22, 2018, 10:04:17 AM »
Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed

Because of the power outage at our printing presses caused by Friday evening’s tornado and storms, home delivery of the Saturday edition will be delayed Sept. 22. Our carriers will continue making deliveries throughout the day. Readers can access an exact facsimile of the Saturday print edition at no charge via our e-edition. We have also […]

Because of the power outage at our printing presses caused by Friday evening’s tornado and storms, home delivery of the Saturday edition will be delayed Sept. 22. Our carriers will continue making deliveries throughout the day.


Readers can access an exact facsimile of the Saturday print edition at no charge via our e-edition. We have also removed the pay meter on our website so readers will not be charged for reading our stories online.


We apologize for the inconvenience.


Source: Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed
25
Best: Why we aren’t ready for the next financial crisis

Ten years after the 2008 global financial crisis, we’re still focusing on the wrong problems.


Ten years ago, as the global economy slipped ever closer to a total meltdown, regulators were slow to recognize the severity of the problem because they were looking in the wrong direction.


Transcripts from the U.S. Federal Reserve’s policymaking committee meeting that took place on Sept. 16, just as the financial giant Lehman Brothers was allowed to fail, include 129 mentions of “inflation,” and just five of “recession.” Not surprisingly, given their narrow focus on inflation, the committee voted to take no action to support the economy, just days before it began to go into free-fall.


We will never know how much the Federal Reserve’s obsession with inflation cost the global economy — not just through that delayed response, but also due to the previous decades of focusing on low inflation rather than jobs and growth.


In retrospect, the Fed’s lack of awareness of the wider economy in 2008 seems crazy. And yet, we are running the risk of doing something very similar today. As stock markets continue to a historically long-bull market, we’re partying like it’s 2007, even as both Canadian and global economies edge into ever more dangerous territory. And we simply don’t have the tools to respond when the next crisis hits.


Why are we acting like the 2008 financial crisis was a blip, when it should have been a wake-up call to transform our financial and economic systems?


During the immediate aftermath of the crisis, of course, governments and central bankers did take bold action. They experimented with quite radical policies, particularly in the U.S. and in Europe, including massive bailouts, quantitative easing and even negative interest rates. Yet, these changes were largely framed as exceptional — temporary aberrations rather than a sign that the tools needed to manage the global economy had changed for good.


Why are we acting like the 2008 financial crisis was a blip, when it should have been a wake-up call to transform our financial and economic systems?


Some more sustained efforts to reform the regulatory system have been successful. Big banks are better capitalized now than they were before the 2008 crisis and regulators have more power. But dig a bit deeper and it is remarkable how many things remain unchanged. The same big three credit rating agencies, whose misleading evaluations helped to blow up the system, still account for more than 96 per cent of all ratings. Big American financial institutions are using loopholes to move their riskier derivatives portfolios offshore where they aren’t regulated. And the real-estate market, which was at the heart of the last major crisis, is a ticking time bomb as interest rates slowly climb back up to more normal levels.


What happened to the big talk of reform that we heard in the early days of the crisis? Policymakers discussed much higher leverage ratios (which would restrain the riskiness of banks’ financial bets), the comprehensive regulation of derivatives, and a financial transactions tax that would make it more costly for big investment firms to make very short-term, often destabilizing, financial bets.


But in the end, the reforms that were made were tweaks rather than major changes. Governments around the world failed to introduce the kinds of wide-ranging reforms needed to prevent and manage the major financial meltdown. When the next economic crisis hits (and yes, there is always another one), our central banks — and our governments — will face much higher levels of debt, far less room to lower interest rates, and few new tools to respond.


Who is to blame for this current dangerous situation, and our woeful lack of preparedness?


CIBC’s CEO, Victor Dodig, recently blamed central banks for the current instabilities in the global financial system — suggesting that they kept interest rates too low too long, creating distortions in housing markets and in the emerging market economies who borrowed cheaply and are now having to pay more than they can afford. Dodig is right to suggest that these are serious warning signs that the economy may be in trouble soon. But he’s pointing a finger in the wrong direction when it comes to allocating blame.


Central banks only kept rates this low because it was the only tool at their disposal to keep the economy going. The real blame rests with the many western governments, including Canada’s Conservatives, who didn’t have the political guts to do what was needed to reform the global economy. These governments flirted briefly with stimulus and discussions of more systematic reform, then shifted all too rapidly to a package of austerity and a few minor reforms.


The heavy lifting for supporting a still ailing economy was left to the central banks — who found themselves keeping rates low far longer than they had ever anticipated.


Higher rates without any government action to support the economy would only have made things worse, sooner. What we needed then, and still need now, is more systematic economic reform of the kind that was only briefly discussed, then ignored, after the 2008 crisis.


It may well be too late to do much more before the next economic crisis hits. We just have to hope that it produces some more creative thinking and, above all, some braver political action to reform the global economy for the long haul.


Jacqueline Best is a Professor at the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa, and the author of Governing Failure, published by Cambridge University Press.


Source: Best: Why we aren’t ready for the next financial crisis
26
Jain: How Canada's coddling of Cuba is helping Venezuela's dictator

Canada prides itself on maintaining a strong relationship with Cuba. However, while the current government is happy to condemn abuses in Saudi Arabia and the Philippines, it has remained silent when it comes to the Cuban dictatorship. Cuba is a key player in propping up the Venezuelan regime, and Canada can no longer stand by […]

Canada prides itself on maintaining a strong relationship with Cuba. However, while the current government is happy to condemn abuses in Saudi Arabia and the Philippines, it has remained silent when it comes to the Cuban dictatorship. Cuba is a key player in propping up the Venezuelan regime, and Canada can no longer stand by and do nothing.


More than two million Cubans fled the island in four mass waves between the 1960s and ’90s. Draconian regulation and nationalizations enacted by the communist regime proved to be catastrophic; malnutrition levels rocketed, and many professionals left their jobs to become taxi drivers and prostitutes. The regime was forced to open the island up to tourism by the mid-1990s to avoid revolt.


Despite its domestic economic reforms, Cuba has continued to support violent pseudo-revolutions internationally. Today, the regime of Raúl Castro and Miguel Díaz-Canel is engaging in the hyper-Cubanization of the nation with the largest petroleum reserves in the world.


In Venezuela, the socialist regime that came to power 19 years ago has implanted itself indefinitely. Expropriations, state-sanctioned looting and price controls have exploded poverty levels. Shortages are dire: From toilet paper to medicine, the Venezuelan people have had to do without basic necessities for years. The state lavishes its revenue, much of it obtained from drug smuggling, on the security forces. Meanwhile, the Venezuelan people must fend for themselves. Three million have fled the country. The parallels to Cuba are hard to ignore.


Under the government of Hugo Chavez (1999-2013), crime, debt and inflation soared in Venezuela. He engaged in unsustainable social spending on the basis of crude oil while seizing media outlets and private companies. Under Chavez-designated successor Nicolás Maduro, Venezuelan statism has begun to closely resemble – and surpass – Cuban misery. There are no more free elections. Newspapers must buy ink and paper from the regime, and the last major independent television station could soon lose its licence. Hundreds of protesters have been shot every year for the last four years. The SEBIN, Venezuela’s secret police, frequently engages in rape and torture.


The Cuban regime has long been at the centre of Venezuela´s reforms. The Venezuelan security system is trained and supported by thousands of Cuban agents in the country. When Venezuela had functioning public hospitals and schools, the socialist regime preferred to import Cuban doctors, nurses and teachers rather than train Venezuelans. In exchange, Cuba was – and still is – plied with millions of barrels of free oil. However, the Cuban regime appears to desire a colony rather than a benefactor.


It is no coincidence that Maduro seems unbothered by the exodus of more than three million Venezuelans. He is mimicking Fidel Castro’s strategy during the construction of state socialism: Compel the rich and educated to leave the country, push out the millions that the state welfare system cannot support, jail and exile opposition leaders, and make the remaining population completely dependent on state handouts. To-date, every nation seems helpless when it comes to halting his creation of another miserable dictatorship in our hemisphere.


While Canada stands with the Lima Group and gives aid to Venezuelan refugees, all of Canada’s political parties are mum about Cuba’s immense role in the manufacturing of the greatest refugee crisis in the history of the Western hemisphere. In addition to imposing more sanctions on Venezuelan officials, Canada must threaten to sanction Cuba should Havana continue to bolster the dictatorship in Caracas. Canada is the largest supplier of tourists to Cuba; President Díaz-Canel cannot afford to irritate his nation´s economic lifeline.


By putting Cuba in its place, Canada has the opportunity to exert real force in stemming the continuation of a continental tragedy. Democratic allies, including Argentina, Peru and Colombia, would welcome a consistent human rights policy from Canada as they deal with millions of refugees.


Avik Jain holds a BA from McGill University and an MA in Latin American Studies from Boston University. He teaches literature at the Italian School of Peru.


 


Source: Jain: How Canada's coddling of Cuba is helping Venezuela's dictator
28
Jonathan Hefney takes another step in recovery from injury that ended his CFL career

Doctors are, in Hefney's words, "pretty, pretty impressed by how things are turning out" because he has displayed more grip strength and improved sense of touch in the fingers on that hand.

The upside in the latest chapter of Jonathan Hefney’s life story is that the former Canadian Football League defensive back has finally had a second surgical procedure to treat the neck and upper body injuries from a helmet-on-helmet collision that ended his playing career nearly three years ago.


Hefney, who played for three CFL clubs between 2009 and 2015, sounds pleased with his progress since the June 22 operation in Charlotte, N.C., where a steel plate and screws were placed in his right shoulder and latissimus dorsi muscle tissue from his back was grafted onto the tricep on the back of his right arm.


Doctors are, in Hefney’s words, “pretty, pretty impressed by how things are turning out” because he has displayed more grip strength and improved sense of touch in the fingers on that hand.


“I’m hoping they’ll be taking the plate out in a couple of years. It just depends on how the nerves heal,” Hefney said. “The plate is protecting the nerves that go from my shoulder to my triceps and all that.”


Training staffs attends to Montreal Alouettes’ Jonathan Hefney during first half CFL football action against the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Thursday Oct. 1, 2015.


Another aspect of Hefney’s story, however, is as scary as the row of staples that runs almost the full length of his back and which were used to close the incision where the latissimus dorsi tissue was harvested for transplant.


Now living back in his hometown of Rock Hill, S.C., the 33-year-old seems destined to spend a long, long, long time paying for this operation, which he said last fall would cost $80,000.


That’s $8,000 less than an earlier surgery on his chest and neck in early 2016, but that previous cost was covered by insurance, minus a deductible paid by the Montreal Alouettes, Hefney’s CFL employer when he collided helmet-to-helmet with Ottawa Redblacks fullback Patrick Lavoie during a game at TD Place stadium on Oct. 1, 2015. Hefney’s injuries included three fractured vertebrae in his neck and damaged nerves leading to his right arm, subsequently causing muscle deterioration and loss of range of motion.



However, his CFL medical benefits ran out exactly 12 months after the injury, or a few months after he began post-operative physiotherapy.


Hefney’s sister, Shan Barber, launched a GoFundMe crowd-funding campaign, but it topped out at slightly more than $15,000. Those funds are long gone now, spent on things such as physiotherapy intended to ensure Hefney was strong enough to tolerate the second surgical procedure, for which the goal was restoring as much strength, range of motion and function as possible in his right arm.


There was also a smaller, unspecified contribution to physiotherapy costs from the CFL Alumni Association Support Fund. Another application has been submitted to that fund’s governing committee, but, even if it’s approved, there’s a $10,000 lifetime maximum for the plan that would appear to be best suited to Hefney’s situation.


Related



“We are not here to help a guy offset his expenses (if he) can afford to pay them,” said Hector Pothier, a former all-star offensive lineman with the Edmonton Eskimos and now chairman of the CFLAA Support Fund board. “It’s more where a fellow is challenged and can’t pay (long-term medical expenses) or he is going to be kicked out out of his house because of it. Then we’re all hands on deck trying to help out …


“We do our best to make those determinations as a committee and then, if the decision is that it meets the criteria and fits in with what we can do, then we support the fellow and pay the bills directly (to the service provider) that he needs assistance with.”


Barber said Hefney applied for financial support from the hospital that performed the surgery in Charlotte, just across the state border from Rock Hill, but the University of Tennessee graduate has been denied both disability benefits and Medicaid, a federal-state program providing health coverage.


Hefney said he was told he didn’t qualify because he hadn’t worked in the United States, where between college and his CFL years he had training-camp or short-term practice-roster stints with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Philadelphia Eagles and Detroit Lions of the National Football League.


Hospital administrators “just say for him to come up with a payment plan and pay what he can,” said Barber, who complained the family believed other individuals had been granted disability benefits even though they hadn’t worked in the U.S., either.


Jonathan Hefney is seen here in a 2018 photo following surgery on June 22, 2018. It was his second surgery for neck and nerve injuries from a head-to-head collision during a CFL game between his Montreal Alouettes and the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Oct. 1, 2015.


“He was told he has a college degree and he is eligible to work,” Barber said. “He does have a college degree, but his injury has (left) him unable to work at this time. It just doesn’t make any sense to us.”


Hefney said one administrator “told me a way we can get some assistance from the government,” and his sister said the family would investigate the possibility of applying for early withdrawal of his CFLPA Pension Plan contributions.


As a professional athlete in Canada, playing for the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers, Calgary Stampeders and Alouettes, Hefney was never covered by provincial workers-benefits legislation.


The CFL Players’ Association last year submitted a brief to an Alberta panel reviewing that province’s injured worker legislation, calling for coverage for players with the Stampeders and Edmonton Eskimos, but in the end they determined that issue didn’t fall within the panel’s jurisdiction.


Another submission was delivered to the British Columbia labour ministry earlier this year, and CFLPA executive director Brian Ramsay says others will follow in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec before year’s end.


“The players as a whole don’t agree that this should be a bargaining issue,” Ramsay said, referring to negotiations that will be required to renew or extend a collective agreement that expires next spring. “The rationale for these submissions (at the provincial level) is that professional athletes shouldn’t have to bargain over health and safety.”


Because of when he was injured, Hefney remained on the Alouettes’ end-of-season roster in 2015, which meant he had general medical benefits — such as prescriptions coverage — through training camp in 2016. Benefits specifically related to his neck injury ended in October 2016.


At that point, the Alouettes had no further contractual obligations to provide Hefney with medical coverage.


There have been no subsequent discussions with the Alouettes or any other team, added Hefney, who was best known for his efforts as a Blue Bomber, including a 2009 nomination as CFL rookie of the year award finalist plus three East Division all-star selections and two more to all-CFL teams.


However, the Blue Bombers released Hefney before the 2013 season after he was arrested on marijuana-possession charges in South Carolina. He played that season with the Stampeders, but was cut again in 2014. He was midway through his first campaign as an Alouette when he was injured in Ottawa in 2015.


Between 2009 and 2015, Jonathan Hefney played for three CFL teams including the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.


There hasn’t been any football since.


He used his left hand to sign a one-day contract that allowed him to retire from the CFL as a Blue Bomber in 2016 and to throw a football around with a young nephew But at this point, the ideal outcome is to live out the rest of his life performing tasks such as eating and signing autographs with what had been his dominant right hand.


In mid-August, Hefney finally got rid of a wrist-to-shoulder splint and sling that had been on his right arm since the surgery in June, but as of this past week hadn’t yet been given a CT scan that, if he passed, would lead to the start of more physiotherapy. He admitted he was getting impatient, “but they’re telling me I have to let it heal, so I’m assuming it’s not healed all the way.”


The long-term goal is raising his right arm to 90 degrees, then hopefully beyond that.


“They don’t want me to raise it over 90 degrees. I know I’m going to try to do it eventually, but I won’t try to prove it too early,” he said. “Mom said, once they do the surgery, it’s pretty much on me how much I’m going to get back.”


Back to what it was before the injury, though, appears to be unlikely. Barber says her brother probably won’t ever be able to perform manual labour or factory work, so he’d have to find a job compatible with his new normal.


“Jonathan has mainly done the therapy because the therapy is essential to everything,” Barber said. “The surgery is really null and void if he isn’t able to get the therapy. I think he’ll be cleared for therapy in the next few weeks.


“He needs more than six months and he needs more than a year. He needs extensive therapy. He would have been very much further along than he is now if the medical insurance had not run out from the CFL (in 2016).”


Perhaps he’s just trying to paint the best possible picture, but Hefney steadfastly maintains that he’s in good spirits, for which he credits his family, including Barber, another sister, Kristen Hefney, and their mother, Cornetta.


Visits from family and friends during his hospital stay in Charlotte were so frequent and so sizeable that the facility eventually restricted their numbers.


“I just keep it day by day,” Hefney said. “It could have been worse. I could have been dead.


“I’m just trying to see how much I can get back.”


Former Canadian Football League player Jonathan Hefney, middle, poses for a photo in front of University of Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee, in a 2018 photo. With him are nephew Kaiden Watkins, left, and Kaiden’s cousin, Jo Jo Brooks. Hefney is a coach with their nine-and-under football team.


Hefney was expected to travel to Winnipeg for the “Banjo Bowl” regular-season matchup between the Blue Bombers and the visiting Saskatchewan Roughriders on Sept. 8. Twenty-three days after that comes the third anniversary of his life-changing and career-ending collision with Lavoie.


“I went 31 years, pretty much … 30 years … without having to worry about anything because I just played football. That was my life,” Hefney said.


“This injury kind of turned things around for me, but, at the same time, I just use that same mentality I used when I played football: I just have to suck it up and I have to keep going.”


gholder@postmedia.com


Twitter.com/HolderGord


Source: Jonathan Hefney takes another step in recovery from injury that ended his CFL career
29
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation
30
Former Senators assistant GM Randy Lee to face trial in Buffalo in November

BUFFALO — Former Ottawa Senators assistant general manager Randy Lee will face a non-jury trial Nov. 9 in Buffalo City Court after a judge on Thursday dismissed one of two harassment charges stemming from an incident during the National Hockey League Scouting Combine. The Senators had suspended Lee, 56, in June after he was accused of repeatedly […]

BUFFALO — Former Ottawa Senators assistant general manager Randy Lee will face a non-jury trial Nov. 9 in Buffalo City Court after a judge on Thursday dismissed one of two harassment charges stemming from an incident during the National Hockey League Scouting Combine.


The Senators had suspended Lee, 56, in June after he was accused of repeatedly rubbing the shoulders of a 19-year-old male shuttle driver and making lewd comments while in Buffalo in May. Lee resigned in August, saying he could not fulfill his obligations to the team while his legal case was ongoing.


Judge Amy C. Martoche dismissed one of the second-degree harassment charges against Lee on the grounds that his alleged behaviour did not meet the legal standard for assaultive conduct defined as “striking or making physical contact with a person.”


Lee will face trial on a second harassment charge that refers to an individual who “repeatedly commits acts which alarm or seriously annoy.” The additional charge was filed a week after Lee was arrested on May 31.


“The judge gave a written decision and we’ll have to review that written decision,” said Lee’s lawyer, Justin D. Ginter.


Ginter is an associate of criminal defence lawyer Paul J. Cambria, who had represented Lee at three previous court appearances. Cambria has also defended Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt and NHL players Patrick Kane and Evander Kane.


Lee, dressed in a dark blue suit, declined to comment after Thursday’s hearing.


Both harassment charges are non-criminal violations in the U.S. court system. If found guilty, Lee could face a fine and up to 15 days in jail, although the Erie County district attorney had said during a June 1 news conference that he wouldn’t seek jail time.


The alleged incident occurred at 10:30 p.m. on May 30, District Attorney John J. Flynn said. Lee had been returning to the Westin Hotel from a downtown restaurant and bar, 716. The hotel is owned by Boston Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs, while 716 is in the HarborCenter complex owned by Buffalo Sabres owners Terry and Kim Pegula.


Lee had been with the Senators organization for 24 years before resigning as assistant general manager and GM of their American Hockey League affiliate in Belleville.


Source: Former Senators assistant GM Randy Lee to face trial in Buffalo in November
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 10