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21
Defence Watch / Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on September 24, 2018, 01:09:19 PM »
Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday

Mixed but dry skies and a high of 16 C are forecast for Monday as the capital continues cleaning up after the storm, but get those tarps ready with rain in the forecast overnight. The overnight low is 10 C with increasing cloudiness and a few showers forecast to begin before morning then more showers […]

Mixed but dry skies and a high of 16 C are forecast for Monday as the capital continues cleaning up after the storm, but get those tarps ready with rain in the forecast overnight.


The overnight low is 10 C with increasing cloudiness and a few showers forecast to begin before morning then more showers Tuesday and a high of 18 C.


Overnight, there’s a 60 per cent chance of showers and a wildly unseasonal low of 18 C.


Wednesday is cloudy with a 60 per cent chance of showers, a high of 23 C and a low of 6 C.


A least of glimpse of sunshine is forecast for Thursday with mixed skies, a high of 18 C and low of 11 C.


For Friday, expect mixed skies, a 30 per cent chance of showers, high of 17 C and low of 7 C.


Saturday is more of the same with mixed skies, a high of 16 C and, overnight, a 30 per cent of showers and low of 7 C.


For Sunday, expect – you guessed it – mixed skies and a high of 14 C.


Source: Cool, dry Monday then risk of rain returns Tuesday
22
Defence Watch / Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed
« Last post by One Veteran One Standard on September 22, 2018, 10:04:17 AM »
Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed

Because of the power outage at our printing presses caused by Friday evening’s tornado and storms, home delivery of the Saturday edition will be delayed Sept. 22. Our carriers will continue making deliveries throughout the day. Readers can access an exact facsimile of the Saturday print edition at no charge via our e-edition. We have also […]

Because of the power outage at our printing presses caused by Friday evening’s tornado and storms, home delivery of the Saturday edition will be delayed Sept. 22. Our carriers will continue making deliveries throughout the day.


Readers can access an exact facsimile of the Saturday print edition at no charge via our e-edition. We have also removed the pay meter on our website so readers will not be charged for reading our stories online.


We apologize for the inconvenience.


Source: Home delivery of Saturday's Citizen delayed
23
Jain: How Canada's coddling of Cuba is helping Venezuela's dictator

Canada prides itself on maintaining a strong relationship with Cuba. However, while the current government is happy to condemn abuses in Saudi Arabia and the Philippines, it has remained silent when it comes to the Cuban dictatorship. Cuba is a key player in propping up the Venezuelan regime, and Canada can no longer stand by […]

Canada prides itself on maintaining a strong relationship with Cuba. However, while the current government is happy to condemn abuses in Saudi Arabia and the Philippines, it has remained silent when it comes to the Cuban dictatorship. Cuba is a key player in propping up the Venezuelan regime, and Canada can no longer stand by and do nothing.


More than two million Cubans fled the island in four mass waves between the 1960s and ’90s. Draconian regulation and nationalizations enacted by the communist regime proved to be catastrophic; malnutrition levels rocketed, and many professionals left their jobs to become taxi drivers and prostitutes. The regime was forced to open the island up to tourism by the mid-1990s to avoid revolt.


Despite its domestic economic reforms, Cuba has continued to support violent pseudo-revolutions internationally. Today, the regime of Raúl Castro and Miguel Díaz-Canel is engaging in the hyper-Cubanization of the nation with the largest petroleum reserves in the world.


In Venezuela, the socialist regime that came to power 19 years ago has implanted itself indefinitely. Expropriations, state-sanctioned looting and price controls have exploded poverty levels. Shortages are dire: From toilet paper to medicine, the Venezuelan people have had to do without basic necessities for years. The state lavishes its revenue, much of it obtained from drug smuggling, on the security forces. Meanwhile, the Venezuelan people must fend for themselves. Three million have fled the country. The parallels to Cuba are hard to ignore.


Under the government of Hugo Chavez (1999-2013), crime, debt and inflation soared in Venezuela. He engaged in unsustainable social spending on the basis of crude oil while seizing media outlets and private companies. Under Chavez-designated successor Nicolás Maduro, Venezuelan statism has begun to closely resemble – and surpass – Cuban misery. There are no more free elections. Newspapers must buy ink and paper from the regime, and the last major independent television station could soon lose its licence. Hundreds of protesters have been shot every year for the last four years. The SEBIN, Venezuela’s secret police, frequently engages in rape and torture.


The Cuban regime has long been at the centre of Venezuela´s reforms. The Venezuelan security system is trained and supported by thousands of Cuban agents in the country. When Venezuela had functioning public hospitals and schools, the socialist regime preferred to import Cuban doctors, nurses and teachers rather than train Venezuelans. In exchange, Cuba was – and still is – plied with millions of barrels of free oil. However, the Cuban regime appears to desire a colony rather than a benefactor.


It is no coincidence that Maduro seems unbothered by the exodus of more than three million Venezuelans. He is mimicking Fidel Castro’s strategy during the construction of state socialism: Compel the rich and educated to leave the country, push out the millions that the state welfare system cannot support, jail and exile opposition leaders, and make the remaining population completely dependent on state handouts. To-date, every nation seems helpless when it comes to halting his creation of another miserable dictatorship in our hemisphere.


While Canada stands with the Lima Group and gives aid to Venezuelan refugees, all of Canada’s political parties are mum about Cuba’s immense role in the manufacturing of the greatest refugee crisis in the history of the Western hemisphere. In addition to imposing more sanctions on Venezuelan officials, Canada must threaten to sanction Cuba should Havana continue to bolster the dictatorship in Caracas. Canada is the largest supplier of tourists to Cuba; President Díaz-Canel cannot afford to irritate his nation´s economic lifeline.


By putting Cuba in its place, Canada has the opportunity to exert real force in stemming the continuation of a continental tragedy. Democratic allies, including Argentina, Peru and Colombia, would welcome a consistent human rights policy from Canada as they deal with millions of refugees.


Avik Jain holds a BA from McGill University and an MA in Latin American Studies from Boston University. He teaches literature at the Italian School of Peru.


 


Source: Jain: How Canada's coddling of Cuba is helping Venezuela's dictator
25
Jonathan Hefney takes another step in recovery from injury that ended his CFL career

Doctors are, in Hefney's words, "pretty, pretty impressed by how things are turning out" because he has displayed more grip strength and improved sense of touch in the fingers on that hand.

The upside in the latest chapter of Jonathan Hefney’s life story is that the former Canadian Football League defensive back has finally had a second surgical procedure to treat the neck and upper body injuries from a helmet-on-helmet collision that ended his playing career nearly three years ago.


Hefney, who played for three CFL clubs between 2009 and 2015, sounds pleased with his progress since the June 22 operation in Charlotte, N.C., where a steel plate and screws were placed in his right shoulder and latissimus dorsi muscle tissue from his back was grafted onto the tricep on the back of his right arm.


Doctors are, in Hefney’s words, “pretty, pretty impressed by how things are turning out” because he has displayed more grip strength and improved sense of touch in the fingers on that hand.


“I’m hoping they’ll be taking the plate out in a couple of years. It just depends on how the nerves heal,” Hefney said. “The plate is protecting the nerves that go from my shoulder to my triceps and all that.”


Training staffs attends to Montreal Alouettes’ Jonathan Hefney during first half CFL football action against the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Thursday Oct. 1, 2015.


Another aspect of Hefney’s story, however, is as scary as the row of staples that runs almost the full length of his back and which were used to close the incision where the latissimus dorsi tissue was harvested for transplant.


Now living back in his hometown of Rock Hill, S.C., the 33-year-old seems destined to spend a long, long, long time paying for this operation, which he said last fall would cost $80,000.


That’s $8,000 less than an earlier surgery on his chest and neck in early 2016, but that previous cost was covered by insurance, minus a deductible paid by the Montreal Alouettes, Hefney’s CFL employer when he collided helmet-to-helmet with Ottawa Redblacks fullback Patrick Lavoie during a game at TD Place stadium on Oct. 1, 2015. Hefney’s injuries included three fractured vertebrae in his neck and damaged nerves leading to his right arm, subsequently causing muscle deterioration and loss of range of motion.



However, his CFL medical benefits ran out exactly 12 months after the injury, or a few months after he began post-operative physiotherapy.


Hefney’s sister, Shan Barber, launched a GoFundMe crowd-funding campaign, but it topped out at slightly more than $15,000. Those funds are long gone now, spent on things such as physiotherapy intended to ensure Hefney was strong enough to tolerate the second surgical procedure, for which the goal was restoring as much strength, range of motion and function as possible in his right arm.


There was also a smaller, unspecified contribution to physiotherapy costs from the CFL Alumni Association Support Fund. Another application has been submitted to that fund’s governing committee, but, even if it’s approved, there’s a $10,000 lifetime maximum for the plan that would appear to be best suited to Hefney’s situation.


Related



“We are not here to help a guy offset his expenses (if he) can afford to pay them,” said Hector Pothier, a former all-star offensive lineman with the Edmonton Eskimos and now chairman of the CFLAA Support Fund board. “It’s more where a fellow is challenged and can’t pay (long-term medical expenses) or he is going to be kicked out out of his house because of it. Then we’re all hands on deck trying to help out …


“We do our best to make those determinations as a committee and then, if the decision is that it meets the criteria and fits in with what we can do, then we support the fellow and pay the bills directly (to the service provider) that he needs assistance with.”


Barber said Hefney applied for financial support from the hospital that performed the surgery in Charlotte, just across the state border from Rock Hill, but the University of Tennessee graduate has been denied both disability benefits and Medicaid, a federal-state program providing health coverage.


Hefney said he was told he didn’t qualify because he hadn’t worked in the United States, where between college and his CFL years he had training-camp or short-term practice-roster stints with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Philadelphia Eagles and Detroit Lions of the National Football League.


Hospital administrators “just say for him to come up with a payment plan and pay what he can,” said Barber, who complained the family believed other individuals had been granted disability benefits even though they hadn’t worked in the U.S., either.


Jonathan Hefney is seen here in a 2018 photo following surgery on June 22, 2018. It was his second surgery for neck and nerve injuries from a head-to-head collision during a CFL game between his Montreal Alouettes and the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Oct. 1, 2015.


“He was told he has a college degree and he is eligible to work,” Barber said. “He does have a college degree, but his injury has (left) him unable to work at this time. It just doesn’t make any sense to us.”


Hefney said one administrator “told me a way we can get some assistance from the government,” and his sister said the family would investigate the possibility of applying for early withdrawal of his CFLPA Pension Plan contributions.


As a professional athlete in Canada, playing for the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers, Calgary Stampeders and Alouettes, Hefney was never covered by provincial workers-benefits legislation.


The CFL Players’ Association last year submitted a brief to an Alberta panel reviewing that province’s injured worker legislation, calling for coverage for players with the Stampeders and Edmonton Eskimos, but in the end they determined that issue didn’t fall within the panel’s jurisdiction.


Another submission was delivered to the British Columbia labour ministry earlier this year, and CFLPA executive director Brian Ramsay says others will follow in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec before year’s end.


“The players as a whole don’t agree that this should be a bargaining issue,” Ramsay said, referring to negotiations that will be required to renew or extend a collective agreement that expires next spring. “The rationale for these submissions (at the provincial level) is that professional athletes shouldn’t have to bargain over health and safety.”


Because of when he was injured, Hefney remained on the Alouettes’ end-of-season roster in 2015, which meant he had general medical benefits — such as prescriptions coverage — through training camp in 2016. Benefits specifically related to his neck injury ended in October 2016.


At that point, the Alouettes had no further contractual obligations to provide Hefney with medical coverage.


There have been no subsequent discussions with the Alouettes or any other team, added Hefney, who was best known for his efforts as a Blue Bomber, including a 2009 nomination as CFL rookie of the year award finalist plus three East Division all-star selections and two more to all-CFL teams.


However, the Blue Bombers released Hefney before the 2013 season after he was arrested on marijuana-possession charges in South Carolina. He played that season with the Stampeders, but was cut again in 2014. He was midway through his first campaign as an Alouette when he was injured in Ottawa in 2015.


Between 2009 and 2015, Jonathan Hefney played for three CFL teams including the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.


There hasn’t been any football since.


He used his left hand to sign a one-day contract that allowed him to retire from the CFL as a Blue Bomber in 2016 and to throw a football around with a young nephew But at this point, the ideal outcome is to live out the rest of his life performing tasks such as eating and signing autographs with what had been his dominant right hand.


In mid-August, Hefney finally got rid of a wrist-to-shoulder splint and sling that had been on his right arm since the surgery in June, but as of this past week hadn’t yet been given a CT scan that, if he passed, would lead to the start of more physiotherapy. He admitted he was getting impatient, “but they’re telling me I have to let it heal, so I’m assuming it’s not healed all the way.”


The long-term goal is raising his right arm to 90 degrees, then hopefully beyond that.


“They don’t want me to raise it over 90 degrees. I know I’m going to try to do it eventually, but I won’t try to prove it too early,” he said. “Mom said, once they do the surgery, it’s pretty much on me how much I’m going to get back.”


Back to what it was before the injury, though, appears to be unlikely. Barber says her brother probably won’t ever be able to perform manual labour or factory work, so he’d have to find a job compatible with his new normal.


“Jonathan has mainly done the therapy because the therapy is essential to everything,” Barber said. “The surgery is really null and void if he isn’t able to get the therapy. I think he’ll be cleared for therapy in the next few weeks.


“He needs more than six months and he needs more than a year. He needs extensive therapy. He would have been very much further along than he is now if the medical insurance had not run out from the CFL (in 2016).”


Perhaps he’s just trying to paint the best possible picture, but Hefney steadfastly maintains that he’s in good spirits, for which he credits his family, including Barber, another sister, Kristen Hefney, and their mother, Cornetta.


Visits from family and friends during his hospital stay in Charlotte were so frequent and so sizeable that the facility eventually restricted their numbers.


“I just keep it day by day,” Hefney said. “It could have been worse. I could have been dead.


“I’m just trying to see how much I can get back.”


Former Canadian Football League player Jonathan Hefney, middle, poses for a photo in front of University of Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee, in a 2018 photo. With him are nephew Kaiden Watkins, left, and Kaiden’s cousin, Jo Jo Brooks. Hefney is a coach with their nine-and-under football team.


Hefney was expected to travel to Winnipeg for the “Banjo Bowl” regular-season matchup between the Blue Bombers and the visiting Saskatchewan Roughriders on Sept. 8. Twenty-three days after that comes the third anniversary of his life-changing and career-ending collision with Lavoie.


“I went 31 years, pretty much … 30 years … without having to worry about anything because I just played football. That was my life,” Hefney said.


“This injury kind of turned things around for me, but, at the same time, I just use that same mentality I used when I played football: I just have to suck it up and I have to keep going.”


gholder@postmedia.com


Twitter.com/HolderGord


Source: Jonathan Hefney takes another step in recovery from injury that ended his CFL career
26
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation
27
Former Senators assistant GM Randy Lee to face trial in Buffalo in November

BUFFALO — Former Ottawa Senators assistant general manager Randy Lee will face a non-jury trial Nov. 9 in Buffalo City Court after a judge on Thursday dismissed one of two harassment charges stemming from an incident during the National Hockey League Scouting Combine. The Senators had suspended Lee, 56, in June after he was accused of repeatedly […]

BUFFALO — Former Ottawa Senators assistant general manager Randy Lee will face a non-jury trial Nov. 9 in Buffalo City Court after a judge on Thursday dismissed one of two harassment charges stemming from an incident during the National Hockey League Scouting Combine.


The Senators had suspended Lee, 56, in June after he was accused of repeatedly rubbing the shoulders of a 19-year-old male shuttle driver and making lewd comments while in Buffalo in May. Lee resigned in August, saying he could not fulfill his obligations to the team while his legal case was ongoing.


Judge Amy C. Martoche dismissed one of the second-degree harassment charges against Lee on the grounds that his alleged behaviour did not meet the legal standard for assaultive conduct defined as “striking or making physical contact with a person.”


Lee will face trial on a second harassment charge that refers to an individual who “repeatedly commits acts which alarm or seriously annoy.” The additional charge was filed a week after Lee was arrested on May 31.


“The judge gave a written decision and we’ll have to review that written decision,” said Lee’s lawyer, Justin D. Ginter.


Ginter is an associate of criminal defence lawyer Paul J. Cambria, who had represented Lee at three previous court appearances. Cambria has also defended Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt and NHL players Patrick Kane and Evander Kane.


Lee, dressed in a dark blue suit, declined to comment after Thursday’s hearing.


Both harassment charges are non-criminal violations in the U.S. court system. If found guilty, Lee could face a fine and up to 15 days in jail, although the Erie County district attorney had said during a June 1 news conference that he wouldn’t seek jail time.


The alleged incident occurred at 10:30 p.m. on May 30, District Attorney John J. Flynn said. Lee had been returning to the Westin Hotel from a downtown restaurant and bar, 716. The hotel is owned by Boston Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs, while 716 is in the HarborCenter complex owned by Buffalo Sabres owners Terry and Kim Pegula.


Lee had been with the Senators organization for 24 years before resigning as assistant general manager and GM of their American Hockey League affiliate in Belleville.


Source: Former Senators assistant GM Randy Lee to face trial in Buffalo in November
28
Senators owner Melnyk pens letter to fans, vows team will stay in Ottawa

Ottawa Senators owner Eugene Melnyk has vowed that his hockey team will not be leaving the city. In an open letter to fans published in the Ottawa Citizen and Ottawa Sun on Tuesday, Melnyk said the team’s focus is on delivering a better hockey experience next season and beyond. “Our Senators are in Ottawa to stay,” […]

Ottawa Senators owner Eugene Melnyk has vowed that his hockey team will not be leaving the city.


In an open letter to fans published in the Ottawa Citizen and Ottawa Sun on Tuesday, Melnyk said the team’s focus is on delivering a better hockey experience next season and beyond. “Our Senators are in Ottawa to stay,” he wrote.


Melnyk said the team will announce a multi-year plan to build a better team, improve the fan experience, grow revenues and deepen the team’s engagement in the community.


He lauded the Senators’ record — nine playoff berths during the past 15 years, including a run to the Stanley Cup finals — while pulling no punches about the team’s dismal showing last year.


“Last season, however, we were horrible and it just wasn’t acceptable,” he said “We must get back to winning, winning a lot more, and with more consistency.”


The team finished 30th among 31 NHL teams last season, and is now contemplating the departure of its most accomplished player and most marketable star: Erik Karlsson.


Karlsson has one year remaining on his contract, and he’s not expected to stay around for Ottawa’s announced rebuild.


Melnyk didn’t address the Karlsson trade rumours in his letter to fans, but declared, “We know that this rebuild makes us the underdog. And we love it.”


ALSO: With only 48 hours until camp starts, will Karlsson be traded?


Source: Senators owner Melnyk pens letter to fans, vows team will stay in Ottawa
29
Prediction of suicide risk based on tweets in the works at Royal Ottawa Hospital

Twitter posts can hold clues about who might be at risk for suicide long before they reach a crisis point, according to new research from The Royal. Dr. Zachary Kaminsky, DIFD Mach-Gaensslen chair in suicide prevention research at The Royal’s Institute of Mental Health Research, is developing an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to predict suicide risk […]

Twitter posts can hold clues about who might be at risk for suicide long before they reach a crisis point, according to new research from The Royal.


Dr. Zachary Kaminsky, DIFD Mach-Gaensslen chair in suicide prevention research at The Royal’s Institute of Mental Health Research, is developing an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to predict suicide risk based on tweets.


Analysing speech patterns, the tool is proving able to predict risk early. The person writing the tweets might not even be aware of the patterns of speech that are raising flags, he said.


During a pilot, the algorithm was able to identify suicide risk with an 89 per cent accuracy rate. There is more work to be done. Kaminsky wants to broaden testing of the tool before it is ready to use. But it appears, he says, that it will work.


“Where I am trying to go is seeing the future. Can we find a pattern using machine learning or artificial intelligence that will say this person appears to be at risk even though there is no other indication?” asks Kaminsky, who is affiliated with the University of Ottawa.


The question is this: How should such a tool be used?


On Monday, World Suicide Prevention Day, Kaminsky will present findings of his ongoing work that could some day become a suicide predictive app, to people who work in suicide prevention and some who have lived with depression and suicidal ideation.


The idea is to work with the community in developing a tool that is beneficial, he said.


His question to those who work in the field is: “We think we are on to something. What do you want us to do with it?”


The work offers a window into how social media and artificial intelligence combined can reveal things about ourselves that we might not be aware of or have not openly articulated.


The algorithm, for example, looks at information such as whether people talk about being a burden, being lonely or depression, and when.


Twitter dispatches such as “I am so alone” and “So alone and unimportant. I literally mean nothing to anyone — swear I can die tmr and no one in this world would know till a few days …” scored high on scales that measure some predictive traits of suicide risk. As did “I’m really a huge burden on everyone around me — emotionally” and “Here is the tragedy: when you are the victim of depression.”


The artificial intelligence uses that information and develops a way to predict who is at future risk.


Kaminsky notes that the use of Twitter for the predictive tool does not imply that parents could read their children’s Tweets and be able to intervene.


“It is not the case that, if someone has lost someone to suicide, if they had just gone in and read their Twitter, they would have seen this risk,” he said. “This is not how this works.”


Machine learning algorithms are “black boxes,” he said. “We don’t know what is happening inside the black box. We don’t know what relationship is predicting the risk.”


Crucial is how such predictive technology could be used. Kaminsky believes it offers the possibility of early intervention and fewer suicides, especially among people between the ages of about 15 and 35 who are both heavy social media users and at risk of suicide. Among Canadians between 15 and 34, suicide is the second leading cause of death, according to Statistics Canada.


Kaminsky also has concerns about how the technology could be used, which is why, he says, it is important to work with the community in its development.


“We want to get the community’s opinion. We want to consider how this could be used for good, but also how it could be abused.”


Among potential concerns, he said, are that it could be used by insurance companies to deny coverage, by future employers or by bullies, he said.


Its potential benefits, he said, include early interventions and suicide prevention, as well as information that could be used by parents to begin conversations with their children to lessen their risk.


“What if I can create an app that a parent downloads and they get an indication of ‘Hey, there are some flags here, maybe you need to have a conversation?’”


epayne@postmedia.com


Source: Prediction of suicide risk based on tweets in the works at Royal Ottawa Hospital
30
Michael L Blais CD, Founder / Canadian Veteran, much higher suicide rate
« Last post by CVA_Posting on September 08, 2018, 10:27:58 PM »
Did you know that Canadian Veterans have a much higher suicide rate than civilians? - https://tgam.ca/2wKeBXF

Over 30% of veterans report having difficulty adjusting back to normal life after service. - https://bit.ly/2hWHt7y

Veterans reported chronic conditions, including arthritis (29%), depression (21%), anxiety (15%), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (14%), at higher prevalences than Canadians of comparable age and sex. - https://bit.ly/2hWHt7y

These men and women put so much on the line to defend the freedoms we so freely enjoy. 

They deserve our honour and support.

This week we have the honour of talking to one of Canada's best about some of the above issues.  His name is Mike Blais, one of our vets.  He is also the President and Founder of the Canadian Veterans Advocacy. http://www.canadianveteransadvocacy.com/

We hope you can join us for this importan conversation for our nation.

AIR TIMES / DETAILS:

Topic: Canada's Veterans
Guest: Mike Blais, Canadian Veterans Advocacy, http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/

We hope you can join us.

---> Vision at 9:30am EST (6:30am PST/7:30am MST/CST)

---> Daystar at 8:30pm (5:30pm PST/6:30pm MST/CST)

---> YES TV Edmonton and Calgary 9:00pm MST

---> YES TV Ontario 9:30pm EST

Daystar also **LIVE STREAMS** it. Daystar Canada @ 8:30 EST Live Stream - http://canada.daystar.com/…/live-stream/

Once it airs on TV it will be posted on our site at http://www.faytene.tv/ so you can also watch it there.

https://www.facebook.com/faytenetv/videos/1889327824489611/
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