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91
Council decision on Château Laurier addition will be based on rules, not feelings

Ottawa city council’s decision on the controversial Château Laurier addition will come down to how the proposal stacks up against the rules, not the feelings of average citizens. Coun. Tobi Nussbaum, chair of the built-heritage subcommittee, said the city’s challenge is making sure the public understands the frame through which the decision-making bodies need to […]

Ottawa city council’s decision on the controversial Château Laurier addition will come down to how the proposal stacks up against the rules, not the feelings of average citizens.


Coun. Tobi Nussbaum, chair of the built-heritage subcommittee, said the city’s challenge is making sure the public understands the frame through which the decision-making bodies need to view the application.


“We’re not judging it on the basis of what we like or not,” Nussbaum said Tuesday, not indicating either way how he’ll vote on the application.


There are two set of guidelines at play: the 1964 Venice Charter developed by the International Council on Monuments and Sites and the city-adopted Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada by Parks Canada.


The Venice Charter calls for additions, if they’re allowed, to not detract from the interesting parts of the heritage building.


But it’s the Parks Canada standards and guidelines, which council has used in heritage matters, that are at the root of the debate over the hotel’s addition. Those rules call for making new elements compatible, but distinguishable, from the heritage building and ensuring there’s a clear distinction between what’s new and what’s old.


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City heritage staff have concluded the hotel addition passes both tests and now it’s up to politicians to either agree or disagree. The city can’t dictate the architectural style of a proposed development.


Parks Canada, the steward of the Rideau Canal and the vistas, has no objections to the application.


The city’s built-heritage subcommittee will consider the matter Monday.


“Our key job at the meeting is to evaluate the application on the appropriate standards and guidelines,” Nussbaum said. “I’m going to benefit, too, from the discussion we have at committee.”


The recommendation from the built-heritage subcommittee will be sent to council’s planning committee.


Larco Investments, the owner of the Château Laurier, wants to build a seven-storey contemporary addition, replacing the parking structure currently under demolition.


The Grand Trunk Railway Company built the Château Laurier in two phases starting in 1908. The old city of Ottawa granted the hotel heritage protection in 1978.


Coun. Jan Harder, chair of the planning committee, which will ultimately send a recommendation to council, said she likes the look of the latest concept of the addition. She lauded the hotel’s plan to increase public access to the building and a new interior courtyard from a terrace near the canal.


“I’ve certainly paid close attention to the evolution of the designs from the beginning to where we are today,” Harder said.


“I’m puzzled by the reaction at sort of the last-minute by Heritage Ottawa because they were part of the sponsor group that was looking at it and it was collaborative. There was a trigger there that changed that.”


Heritage Ottawa has slammed the design as being incompatible with the hotel.


The design process has lasted a year-and-a-half and included four versions. The heritage working group of city staff, federal representatives and architects, along with city’s urban design review panel, helped advise Larco.


Harder said the new addition won’t encumber views to the historic hotel. She likes that Larco’s architects have added more limestone to the design. According to Harder, the National Capital Commission is insisting that all the trees remain on the northern edge of the property at Major’s Hill Park.


“I like the openness of it. Remember, until recently it was a parking garage and not a nice one. I’m not saying we should let them off on not having good design. I think this is good design,” Harder said.


“I think that ideally if most people had their wish it would be, just extend the Château Laurier exactly as it is. It would be easy, but I don’t think it would be the right way to go.”


Rideau Coun. Mathieu Fleury, who represents the ward, said there should be more discussion about the “replica policy” that prevents additions from mimicking the heritage building.


“There are unique contexts and this is one,” Fleury said. “We should have considered the impact of the policy right off the bat.”


The built-heritage subcommittee on Monday and planning committee on June 26 will invite public delegates to share their opinions. City council is scheduled to hold a final vote on June 27.


The NCC’s board of directors will eventually make its own decision on the design during the federal approval process. The NCC said the application could go to the board in September.


jwilling@postmedia.com


twitter.com/JonathanWilling


Source: Council decision on Château Laurier addition will be based on rules, not feelings
92
Shots fired inside Milano Pizzeria at Hunt Club and Bank

Shots were fired inside the Milano Pizzeria at Hunt Club Road and Bank Street, Ottawa police east division said Saturday night. No one was injured in the shooting, which took place just before 8:30 p.m. One person fled the scene on foot, police said. No one had been arrested Saturday night. No other information was […]

Shots were fired inside the Milano Pizzeria at Hunt Club Road and Bank Street, Ottawa police east division said Saturday night.


No one was injured in the shooting, which took place just before 8:30 p.m. One person fled the scene on foot, police said. No one had been arrested Saturday night.


No other information was immediately available.


 


Source: Shots fired inside Milano Pizzeria at Hunt Club and Bank
93
As Ontario turned blue, Liberal incumbent John Fraser wasn't watching

(He was vacuuming.)  

(He was vacuuming.)


 


Source: As Ontario turned blue, Liberal incumbent John Fraser wasn't watching
94
Chinese tour bus crash victims remain critical in hospitals

At least four Chinese tourists remained in Eastern Ontario hospitals in critical condition Wednesday, two days after their tour bus crashed into a rock cut on Highway 401 near Prescott. Three patients remained at the Kingston Health Sciences Centre’s in critical condition and one patient remained at Brockville General Hospital in critical condition with life-threatening injuries, […]

At least four Chinese tourists remained in Eastern Ontario hospitals in critical condition Wednesday, two days after their tour bus crashed into a rock cut on Highway 401 near Prescott.


Three patients remained at the Kingston Health Sciences Centre’s in critical condition and one patient remained at Brockville General Hospital in critical condition with life-threatening injuries, according to hospital officials.


The Union Tour Express bus with 37 people on board went off the road and slammed into a rocky embankment near Prescott at about 2:30 p.m. Monday.


A 54-year-old man who was aboard the bus that had left Ottawa for Toronto died of his injuries Tuesday, police said. The driver of the bus suffered minor injuries.


A spokeswoman for Grenville County OPP said there was no update made public by investigators Wednesday.


The Ottawa Hospital said it still had two patients in its care on Wednesday: one was in stable condition, the other in “satisfactory” condition.


Minister-counsellors Heng Xiaojun and Zhao Haisheng from the Chinese embassy in Ottawa went to the hospitals to visit the injured tourists. All but the driver and one of two tour guides aboard the bus were citizens of China and the embassy hailed local efforts to help them.


First responders “spared no effort to treat the injured,” according to a statement on Wednesday, while Canadian agencies and volunteers “actively provided assistance.


“We are grateful to the Canadian side for the treatment and related assistance provided to the Chinese tourists.”





 


Source: Chinese tour bus crash victims remain critical in hospitals
95
Subtone at the National Arts Centre (concert review)

The rousing German post-bop quintet recently completed its first cross-Canada tour.

Given that its five members are scattered not just in two Germany cities but also as distantly as New York City and St. John’s, Nfld., when the quintet called Subtone is able to reunite and play a few times each year, it’s a special occasion from the get-go.


But the band’s music was all the more impressive and lucid in Ottawa last month at the National Arts Centre’s Fourth Stage because of the big run-up that had preceded the performance. By then, the group had the bulk of its cross-Canada tour under its belt. Over two weeks and a few days, Subtone had made the journey from Vancouver, Revelstoke and Salmon Arm in B.C., to Edmonton, Saskatoon and Regina in the Prairies, to Toronto and then to Montreal and then to Ottawa, leaving only St. John’s on the itinerary. Coincidentally or not, on the program in Ottawa there was a composition called Road Trip.











What’s more, just before playing in Ottawa the band had spent two days in Studio PM in Montreal, recording its fifth album. If the anticipation of that session had created any pressure for the musicians, it had been dispelled, and the Ottawa concert was an opportunity to let off steam on new music that had been properly road-tested.


Founded 13 years ago when its members were in university together in Berlin, Subtone plays high-powered, sophisticated, tautly arranged original music. For trumpeter Magnus Schriefl, reeds player Malte Dürrschnabel. pianist Florian Hoefner, bassist Matthias Pichler and drummer Peter Gall, there was consistently a lot of detailed material to execute. But the music’s thrills came not just from its baked-in richness bur also  from the way in which the band could dive deeply and collectively into improvising while using those compositions as springboards.


Here’s the set list:


Upside Up (Florian Hoefner)

Evif (Magnus Schriefl)

Road Trip (Peter Gall)

Orbit (Florian Hoefner)

Rubulad (Peter Gall)

Lament (Magnus Schriefl)

Alphabet City (Peter Gall)


Although they were the work of three distinct composers, the tunes fit together to form a cohesive, well-rounded program.


Hoefner — the band’s foothold in Canada, so to speak, because the Nuremberg-born pianist has lived for the last few years in St. John’s, where he and his wife are on staff at Memorial University — was well-represented by his two tunes.


The concert’s opener Upside Up was a crisp, swinging waltz with a lot of built-in interest in its arrangement and space for Dürrschnabel’s burly tenor saxophone and Hoefner’s piano to stretch out. Orbit featured evocative writing for Hoefner’s piano and Dürrschnabel’s flute before the tune became more rousing.


Schriefl’s surging tune Evif was a lesson in how to thrive and find freedom in roiling rhythmic waters. The trumpeter’s tune came charging out of the block, stressing rhythmic intensity. Then, when it came time for Schriefl and then Hoefner to carve out their solos, they and bassist Pichler and drummer Gall played with striking spaciousness. On the trumpeter’s austere tune Lament, Dürrschnabel stepped out on clarinet.


Perhaps because I was sitting on the drum side of the stage, and because Gall had contributed three tunes to the set, it felt at times if the collective was his band. His compositions teemed with interesting features and structures. For example, here’s Schriefl navigating through the solo form of Gall’s swinging and harmonically loaded tune Rubulad:



Meanwhile, Alphabet City had that extra sizzle required of a set-closer. Here’s that very hip tune’s charged opening, which set expectations high:



Subtone’s concert, and indeed its entire tour, would not have happened without support from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Embassy of Germany in Ottawa and the Goethe Institute. The latter two, I’m sure, wanted to ensure that Canadian jazz fans got a good glimpse of some prime ambassadors of German jazz. In fact, Subtone offered original jazz at a level that any country would be happy to have as representing it.


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phum@postmedia.com

twitter.com/peterhum

ottawacitizen.com/jazzblog


Source: Subtone at the National Arts Centre (concert review)
96
Editorial: Progressive Conservatives should form next government

If anything has become clear over the past several weeks, it’s that Ontario voters are fed up with the status quo. Big government, big spending, big deficits. After 15 years of Liberals, most people want a true shift in approach at Queen’s Park. They won’t get that by voting NDP. Andrea Horwath’s team offers ideas drearily […]

If anything has become clear over the past several weeks, it’s that Ontario voters are fed up with the status quo. Big government, big spending, big deficits. After 15 years of Liberals, most people want a true shift in approach at Queen’s Park.


They won’t get that by voting NDP. Andrea Horwath’s team offers ideas drearily similar to those of the woebegone Grits: more spending, more social programs, more government in our lives. While Horwath is less personally disliked than Kathleen Wynne, she offers dismayingly similar policy prescriptions. Let’s not choose “more of the same.”


What to do instead? Vote Progressive Conservative. Here’s why.


For all his current inexperience provincially, PC leader Doug Ford encapsulates a belief that Ontarians have a right to keep more of their own money, and that businesses are not simply cash cows for runaway government projects. The PCs acknowledge the need for serious support in areas voters worry most about, from health care to education to hydro bills, but unlike the other major parties, they don’t think the answers to all of society’s ills lie in buying our votes with our own money.


The PCs are also fielding an experienced roster of candidates: MPP Randy Hillier (Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington) has ably served as justice critic; MPP Lisa MacLeod (now running in Nepean) is a one-time finance critic; John Yakabuski (Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke) has served as energy critic; and Lisa Thompson (Huron Bruce) was international trade critic, important during NAFTA negotiations and talk of tariffs facing Canadian goods. Former MPP and health critic Christine Elliott (now running in Newmarket-Aurora) will bring formidable experience and sense into any cabinet she joins; and Caroline Mulroney (running in York—Simcoe) has already proven herself a superior candidate for public office.


Here are three areas in particular to think about.


Health care:


The Tories have promised 15,000 more long-term care beds over five years. They’re needed to help clear a backlog in the province and reduce hospital wait times. The PCs also pledge $1.9 billion over 10 years for mental-health care.


But real health care reform will require more than just upping spending. Only the PCs are placed to even begin an honest conversation with Ontarians about other models and innovations that work in other jurisdictions; neither the NDP nor the Liberals will ever venture beyond status quo bromides on health.


Taxation:


A promised tax cut from 9.15 per cent to 7.32 per cent for the middle class should ease the financial burden on many families; a pro-business corporate tax rate cut from 11.5 per cent to 10.5 per cent ought to encourage investment and is vital given the anti-trade policies south of our border; and small business, burdened by rapid minimum wage hikes under the Liberal government, would see the rate frozen at $14 per hour rather than rise again next year. Small business tax rates would also be lowered.


Downsizing government


The PCs want government gone from places it shouldn’t be. Liberalizing alcohol sales by allowing beer and wine in corner stores is a sensible, pro-business, pro-consumer policy. Cutting corporate welfare would reduce government meddling in the private sector, and a tax credit for child care would help ensure families, not governments, decide how they want to receive this key service.


If Ontarians really want change, they need to vote for it. That means voting Progressive Conservative.


Source: Editorial: Progressive Conservatives should form next government
97
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation
98
Leadership key election issue in Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes

This story first appeared in the Brockville Recorder on May 25, 2018. GANANOQUE – As the provincial election campaign reaches its halfway point, the question of party leadership was the elephant in the room at this all-candidates meeting Wednesday, May 23. Asked why their leader would be best for the province, the local candidates alternatively […]

This story first appeared in the Brockville Recorder on May 25, 2018.


GANANOQUE – As the provincial election campaign reaches its halfway point, the question of party leadership was the elephant in the room at this all-candidates meeting Wednesday, May 23.


Asked why their leader would be best for the province, the local candidates alternatively praised and defended their leaders or took potshots at the others.


Conservative candidate Steve Clark said Doug Ford always has been approachable, ready to listen to his concerns, and responsive to his advice and questions.


But the incumbent MPP for Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes stressed that the leaders’ names are not on the ballot for the June 7 election.


Clark, who is running on his eight-year record as MPP, said “all politics is local” and urge that voters select the candidate whom will best fight for their interests.


“When you sit there in the ballot box, my name’s going to be on the ballot, and I want you to stand up and vote for a local representative that’s in your corner – and that’s me,” he urged the all-candidates meeting.


NDP candidate Michelle Taylor criticized Ford for being “extremely polarizing” with an “us-against-them” mentality.


She criticized his commitment to democracy because of his interference in the Conservative candidate-selection process.


Taylor also had harsh words for Liberal leader Kathleen Wynne. Wynne has not done a good job of focussing on the needs of people, she said.


It was only during the run-up to the election that Wynne began offering some progressive policies, which appeared to be taken right out of the NDP policy book, Taylor said. She said voters should question Wynne’s commitment to those policies.


In comparison, NDP leader Andrea Horwath spent four years developing a party platform focussed at people who really need help, said Taylor, adding that Horwath is the only “sane choice.”


Liberal David Henderson took issue with Taylor’s assessment of the NDP platform. He said that the NDP made a $1.4 billion error in costing its platform and had made an earlier $5-billion miscalculation.


As for the NDP’s policy on Ontario Hydro, the party proposes buying back the hydro company, which would cost $9 billion, and then somehow cutting hydro rates by 30 per cent.


“That’s pure fantasy,” he said.


His leader, Kathleen Wynne, is in a difficult spot because she had to make tough decisions as leader, Henderson said. But Wynne managed to bring in progressive social polices while keeping a close eye on the province’s bottom line, he said.


Green Party candidate Derek Morley said his leader, Michael Schreiner, is an affable guy who spent a lot of time developing the party’s platform and making sure that it was professionally costed.


He said it is a shame that more Ontarians don’t know about his “incredible leader.”


It is a great pity that the television networks did not invite Schreiner to Sunday’s televised debate – a decision that he called anti-democratic.


Morley urged the audience to join a Twitter campaign to get Schreiner into the televised debate.


wlowrie@postmedia.com


Source: Leadership key election issue in Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes
99
Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation

The Aga Khan Academies and Ryerson University have established a partnership to help develop Academies students as part of the next wave of socially conscious young innovators. Ryerson is providing 12 fellowships over three years for Academies students and faculty to attend the Ryerson summer programme. The collaboration between Ryerson University and the Academies gives talented students the opportunity to accelerate their learning and hands-on experience with innovation and entrepreneurship at one of Ontario’s premier universities.



Source: Aga Khan Academies partner with Ryerson University on training for innovation
100
Sajjan to make defence policy announcement Wednesday at CANSEC

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan’s office says the minister will “advance defence policy” when he appears at CANSEC 2018 on Wednesday morning. Sajjan is speaking at 8:25 a.m. and will then talk to journalists at 9 a.m. His announcement is related to the Liberal government’s Defence Policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, according to his office. On May 22, […]

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan’s office says the minister will “advance defence policy” when he appears at CANSEC 2018 on Wednesday morning. Sajjan is speaking at 8:25 a.m. and will then talk to journalists at 9 a.m. His announcement is related to the Liberal government’s Defence Policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, according to his office.


On May 22, Defence Watch reported that industry representatives are expecting Ssajjan to release the defence investment plan at CANSEC in Ottawa.


The Liberals released their defence policy last June. However, there was little in the document about what specific programs are expected to cost and which ones would be a priority, besides shipbuilding and the acquisition of new fighter jets. The previous Conservative government, and later the Liberals, had published what was called the Defence Acquisition Guide or DAG, which for the years 2014, 2015 and 2016 outlined various programs with a very broad cost estimate.


Source: Sajjan to make defence policy announcement Wednesday at CANSEC
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