Veterans/Military News-Discussion > Veterans Affairs Canada - Anciens Combattants Canada

Supporting Canadian Vet with Disabilities:A Comparison of Financial Benefit

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Canadian_Vet:
Conclusions

Several conclusions arise from this study. The first and most obvious is that the Pension Act provides a significant financial advantage over the New Veterans Charter (NVC) for veterans with severe disabilities. The difference between the Pension Act and the NVC compensations is greatest for veterans who live longer, those who are married and have more children, those with a higher disability assessment, and those released at a lower rank.

These groups are financially disadvantaged under the NVC compared to the Pension Act.

Changes need to be made to the NVC to ensure that veterans with severe disabilities receive compensation equivalent to that under the Pension Act. The most obvious discrepancies come from programs or benefits that were eliminated under the NVC. It would benefit veterans with severe disabilities if Attendant Care Allowance was reinstated as part of the financial benefits, and if spousal and child benefits were restored to the plan. In this way, the NVC would acknowledge the family and their new life circumstances of living with a veteran with severe disabilities, particularly if the family is the primary caregiver, which is often the case.

Additionally, changes need to be made to address the lack of financial support for veterans after the age of 65, when veterans may have the most need. All benefits should continue until the time of a veteran’s death and should not be stopped once the veteran receives the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan (CPP, QPP). Like other Canadians, veterans earned CPP or QPP, and their disability benefits should be considered separate from these monies and continue until their death.

It can be seen from this analysis that the majority of the benefits offered under the NVC are taxable. This puts NVC veterans at a serious disadvantage over their life course since the net amount they take home each month is less than the gross amount they are pensioned. Over the life course of the veteran, this can amount to a significant amount of money.

Overall, to change the NVC to accommodate veterans with severe disabilities would not be very costly since only 4 percent of all NVC veterans are considered seriously disabled. One of the most important recommendations that comes out of this study is that creating separate standards and pension categories for veterans with severe disabilities may ensure that the NVC supports veterans who are most in need.

[pdf]http://www.queensu.ca/dms/publications/claxton/Claxton13.pdf[/pdf]

Sylvain Chartrand CD:
Conclusions

Several conclusions arise from this study. The first and most obvious is that the Pension Act provides a significant financial advantage over the New Veterans Charter (NVC) for veterans with severe disabilities. The difference between the Pension Act and the NVC compensations is greatest for veterans who live longer, those who are married and have more children, those with a higher disability assessment, and those released at a lower rank.

These groups are financially disadvantaged under the NVC compared to the Pension Act.

Changes need to be made to the NVC to ensure that veterans with severe disabilities receive compensation equivalent to that under the Pension Act. The most obvious discrepancies come from programs or benefits that were eliminated under the NVC. It would benefit veterans with severe disabilities if Attendant Care Allowance was reinstated as part of the financial benefits, and if spousal and child benefits were restored to the plan. In this way, the NVC would acknowledge the family and their new life circumstances of living with a veteran with severe disabilities, particularly if the family is the primary caregiver, which is often the case.

Additionally, changes need to be made to address the lack of financial support for veterans after the age of 65, when veterans may have the most need. All benefits should continue until the time of a veteran’s death and should not be stopped once the veteran receives the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan (CPP, QPP). Like other Canadians, veterans earned CPP or QPP, and their disability benefits should be considered separate from these monies and continue until their death.

It can be seen from this analysis that the majority of the benefits offered under the NVC are taxable. This puts NVC veterans at a serious disadvantage over their life course since the net amount they take home each month is less than the gross amount they are pensioned. Over the life course of the veteran, this can amount to a significant amount of money.

Overall, to change the NVC to accommodate veterans with severe disabilities would not be very costly since only 4 percent of all NVC veterans are considered seriously disabled. One of the most important recommendations that comes out of this study is that creating separate standards and pension categories for veterans with severe disabilities may ensure that the NVC supports veterans who are most in need.

[pdf]http://www.queensu.ca/dms/publications/claxton/Claxton13.pdf[/pdf]

http://www.scribd.com/doc/116970733/Claxton13-Rev-1-0

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