Author Topic: CVA Sit Rep. Two Suicides, CFB Shilo, 26/11/2013  (Read 55010 times)

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Canadian_Vet

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Military suicides tragic, but not epidemic
« Reply #45 on: March 29, 2014, 02:56:50 PM »
Military suicides tragic, but not epidemic

By JENNIFER TAPLIN
Published March 28, 2014 - 6:48pm

http://thechronicleherald.ca/thenovascotian/1196696-military-suicides-tragic-but-not-epidemic?from=most_read&most_read=1196696



There’s no training, no lecture to prepare someone for the soul-quaking experience of fearing for their lives or seeing someone killed in front of them. Even when soldiers train in live-fire scenarios and are told what they might expect in a combat zone, the trauma of these experiences changes them. It just depends how much.

But it doesn’t mean every person involved in a traumatic event is left with post-traumatic stress disorder. In fact, only about eight per cent of deployed Canadian Forces personnel come back with PTSD, said Cmdr. Ken Cooper, psychiatrist and clinical leader for Mental Health Services in Halifax.

“The vast majority of our soldiers who are in combat, although they come back changed, they are coming back mentally intact and healthy.”

Cooper says it’s the people who aren’t able to process the emotions, who keep the traumatic event locked into their subconscious through avoidance, who develop PTSD.

“It’s like an abscess in the mind and it causes symptoms.”

Those symptoms usually involve re-experiencing the event, avoidance, and hyper-arousal symptoms, including sleep disruption, irritability, and concentration problems.

Ten suicides in the Canadian Forces since November have prompted public concern about PTSD and worry over mental health services for the country’s soldiers. At the time of the funeral for Warrant Officer Michael Robert McNeil in Truro in November, his family spoke out about the need for awareness of post-traumatic stress disorder for members and their families, to show them support, and encourage them to get help.

One of those support programs is Operational Stress Injury Social Support. Though not as widely known as it could be, it’s a peer support program for Forces members and their families to deal with injuries like PTSD or depression. It started in 2001 and now has offices in 20 bases across the country. There are four peer support and family support co-ordinators in Nova Scotia. They offer one-on-one and group peer sessions. Last year in Atlantic Canada, they worked with about 473 people a month.

“Basically what we can do as peer support is we can reframe things and put it into more of a balanced perspective,” said Shawn Hearn, regional co-ordinator of Operational Stress Injury Social Support for the Atlantic region. He is based in St. John’s, N.L.

“Often when people begin to deal with this, they often don’t understand what’s wrong with them. Having someone who’s been down that road before and at a point in their recovery where they can offer assistance to others I think is very important.”

Hearn, who was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder himself after a deployment to Bosnia in 1994, said all the 45 Operational Stress Injury Social Support co-ordinators have experience with these kinds of operational stress injuries. They’ve either been diagnosed themselves or have lived with a family member with these injuries.

“Peer support is almost impossible to explain but it’s being connected with others who understand where you’ve been and what you’ve done. There are no questions asked and we’re a completely non-judgmental program.”

The biggest hurdles people with operational stress injuries face in the beginning is dealing with the injury, normalizing it and “putting it in the basket it needs to be in,” Hearn said.

“I could feel that something was different about me, but could not figure out what,” reads a testimonial from a Canadian Forces member named John who was deployed to several wartorn countries during his career.

“I thought I was just tired, that everybody was going out of their way to yank my chain, to ridicule me or just ignore me. Talking with guys that have had the same experience that I had, speaking the same language that I do, it is incredible what it is doing for me.”

Cooper said peer programs like these are immensely helpful in ending the isolation people with PTSD feel.

Over at the mental health clinic at CFB Halifax, Cooper said they get about 110 referrals a year. There are about 40 health professionals at the clinic, including psychiatrists, counsellors, and addiction counsellors. The Department of National Defence recently announced they’re hiring an additional 54 health professionals. Cooper said he expects there will be an additional two or three hires in Halifax.

The Canadian Press recently reported that despite the injection of $11.4 million in 2012 and specific promises by the Harper government to hire more staff, the number of mental-health workers has remained static at roughly 380, instead of the decade-old goal of 450.

Since 2010, a medical team consisting of a psychiatrist and a medical practitioner has investigated every suicide in the Canadian Forces to identify any systemic issues that contributed to the tragedy. Cooper has done eight of these.

“What our data is showing so far is the people who deployed, especially to Afghanistan, are no more likely to kill themselves than people who have not deployed. That message isn’t getting out there, but the reality is that people who have deployed are no more or less likely to kill themselves.”

In fact, Cooper said many of the suicides he has investigated are actually due to the same reasons people in the general population kill themselves: mental illness, depression as opposed to post-traumatic stress disorder, combined with acute stress like a failed interpersonal relationship, financial problems, or health problems. People with post-traumatic stress disorder from deployments have killed themselves, Cooper said, but the data shows it’s no more likely than people who haven’t deployed.

“Every suicide, even one, is a tragedy and we should do as much as we can to prevent it. But it’s simply not true we have an epidemic, that things are out of control,” Cooper said.

He said the big challenge is getting the message out about what is normal and what’s not after a deployment, and where members and their families can get help. The number for Operational Stress Injury Support is 1-800-883-6094.

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Afghanistan vets ‘not violent … they’re killing themselves’
« Reply #46 on: May 02, 2014, 10:42:28 PM »
Afghanistan vets ‘not violent … they’re killing themselves’

The suicide of Afghan veteran leaves family in shock and questions about the state of mental health services available for the troops.


Peter Anderson displays a photo of his older son Ron in his home in Lincoln, N.B. Ron served with the Royal Canadian Regiment in Afghanistan. He returned home suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and took his own life last February.

By: Bruce Campion-Smith Ottawa Bureau, Published on Fri May 02 2014

OTTAWA—“The army can train them to go to war. But they can’t train them to come home.”

Peter Anderson knows first-hand the tragic fallout of Canada’s war in Afghanistan. His two sons served in H Company, 2nd battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment on the same tour in 2007.

Both came home casualties of war, suffering post-traumatic stress disorder.

Younger son Ryan, 34, is in treatment for his stress injuries.

On Feb. 24, his older son Ron, 39, killed himself.

“It was an awful shock to us,” the father said in a telephone interview from his home in Lincoln, N.B. “He gave us no hint. None.”

Ron Anderson left behind two boys, ages 14 and 13 and twin girls, age 10, and questions about the state of mental health services available for the troops.

Ron Anderson’s suicide was not an isolated incident. Between November and March, five regular-force soldiers and four reservists took their lives.

Those deaths included Master Cpl. William Elliott, 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, who had four tours abroad, including two in Afghanistan; Warrant Officer Michael McNeil, who had done multiple tours abroad, including Afghanistan, and was a decorated combat veteran; and Cpl. Leona MacEachern, who had retired from the forces.

MacEachern’s death when her car crashed head-on into a transport truck west of Calgary on Christmas Day initially appeared to be an accident. However, her husband Tom later said later it was an “intentional final desperate act.”

“We would like to say that Leona had slipped through the cracks in the system but in fact, there does not seem to be ‘a system’,” he said in a statement after her death.

‘Problem on their hands’

Because he had just retired from the armed forces, Ron Anderson’s death won’t be counted in official statistics. Veterans Affairs does not compile statistics on suicides or suicide attempts. But his father has no doubt it was related to his time in uniform.

“The thing with this PTSD bit, they’ve got a big problem on their hands here,” Peter Anderson told the Star.

Ron, who held the rank of sergeant, was a veteran of seven tours in places like Kosovo, Croatia and twice in Afghanistan. “Always in the infantry. Always up front,” his dad said.

Each tour took a toll on his mental fitness. But it was the last rotation in Afghanistan in 2007 that proved his undoing.

“When you get up every morning under fire and on and on it goes like that, it’s bound to get to some,” Peter said.

“He wouldn’t tell us much. He wouldn’t get into that. He wouldn’t get into the war, neither, who he killed and stuff.”

The worst day came on April 8, 2007, when a LAV III armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb, killing the six soldiers inside. Ron was following in the vehicle behind.

His sons returned to Canada from Afghanistan changed men. Peter saw the symptoms up close. Drinking. Gambling. An indifference to the world. Ron would sometimes retreat to the woods, just to be alone.

“They don’t care,” the father said. “There’s no caring about anything. They’re not violent. These guys aren’t killing people. They’re killing themselves.”

Peter Anderson is himself a 30-year veteran of the armed forces, retiring at the rank of sergeant-major. He says the current spate of suicides is not normal. He’s at a loss on how to help. But he questions whether the armed forces are ready to cope with the fallout from the Afghan mission.

“Their solution . . . is send them home. So they go home. They sit alone, whether it be their garage or their basement, wherever, and drink all day.”

The military says the number of suicides among military members has been relatively stable in recent years. In 2013, nine members of Canada’s military took their own life; an additional four deaths have not been confirmed yet as suicides. There were 10 in 2012, 21 in 2011, 12 in 2010 and 11 in 2009. The military also says that the suicide rate is not significantly different from the general population.

The military’s health branch reviews each suicide and so far, has found no pattern that links the deaths to their service, said Dr. Paul Sedge, a psychiatrist with 30 years in uniform.

“People kill themselves in the (Canadian Forces) for the same reasons they do in the civilian world,” Sedge said in an interview “They usually have a mental illness and then usually there is a psycho-social stressor that precipitated it. Most commonly, like 50 per cent of the time, it’s a relationship.”

A review of suicides in 2011 and 2012 by the health branch found that a history of mental illness was present in almost half of the suicides with major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder topping the list.

The suicide review found that a relationship failure or conflict was a factor in almost half of the suicides. Other stresses include career-related issues (21 per cent); financial troubles (15 per cent); and chronic physical health problems (13 per cent).

Almost two-thirds had deployed at least once and 36 per cent had deployed on two or more missions. Half of those who had taken their life had deployed in support of the Afghanistan mission.

The predominant mental illness in the Canadian Forces is depression, which is higher than in the general population, especially among males in the regular force, who had double the rate, Brig.-Gen. Jean-Robert Bernier, the military’s surgeon-general, told a parliamentary committee last month. .

“You can’t divorce a suicide prevention program from the broader mental health system,” Bernier said. “Good mental health is what helps prevent suicide.

“We have to increase getting people into care and we have to increase the quality and the effectiveness of the treatments.”

What happens to troubled troops after they leave the military is a question mark. As in Ron Anderson’s case, suicides by those who have left the military are not routinely counted, even though their deaths could be attributed to their service.

However, suicides among former military members were examined in a study by Statistics Canada, the Defence Department and Veterans Affairs. Its findings, released in May 2011, found that among males, the risk of suicide was about one and a half times higher than the general male population. “This difference was statistically significant,” the study said.

It also found that non-commissioned members were more likely to kill themselves than officers. So too were members with less than 10 years of service. The suicide rate was higher for individuals who had been medically released or forced out of the ranks compared with those who left voluntarily.

Leona’s struggle

Though she never saw combat, Leona MacEachern had served as a military police officer and had been treated for stress and fatigue. In the 16 months before her death, her husband Tom MacEachern says the family struggled with Veterans Affairs to get her help.

“So is this a department with a culture of compassion or efficiency?” he told a parliamentary committee last month.

“We can’t deal with people, especially wounded people, using the same processes we use to procure office supplies,” he said.

“Veterans need immediate access to properly trained medical or social workers . . . who in a crisis can help make the connections required between the veterans and who can help.”

In the wake of his wife’s death, MacEachern said, the family heard from others who were suffering and worries that PTSD has reached “epidemic proportions” within the military.

“As much as some would like to put Afghanistan behind us . . . I hope I’m wrong, but based on recent past experience with other soldiers in crisis, we could be in for a rude awakening.”

In February, the military had 104 active boards of inquiry examining “significant” events such as the deaths of Canadian Forces members. That included 75 investigations into suicides and attempted suicides.

Senior commanders launched a so-called “tiger team” to tackle the backlog and by mid-April, outstanding inquiries into suicides and attempted suicides tallied 45, including five new inquiries launched this year.
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Une « crise » des suicides dans l’armée canadienne
« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2014, 07:06:29 AM »
Une « crise » des suicides dans l’armée canadienne

Ce fléau a fait plus de morts en 10 ans que la mission en Afghanistan, a appris Le Journal

Dominique La Haye @

Journal de Québec, Publié le: lundi 15 septembre 2014, 22H46 | Mise   jour: lundi 15 septembre 2014, 23H19

http://www.journaldequebec.com/2014/09/15/une--crise--des-suicides-dans-larmee-canadienne



Coup d'oeil sur cet article

Les suicides au sein des Forces armées ont fait plus de victimes depuis 10 ans que la mission canadienne en Afghanistan, où 158 militaires ont perdu la vie. La situation préoccupe certains observateurs, qui s’inquiètent du phénomène.

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Military suicides outnumbered deaths in Afghanistan, new stats show
« Reply #48 on: September 16, 2014, 07:37:17 AM »
Military suicides outnumbered deaths in Afghanistan, new stats show

Dominique La Haye, QMI Agency

First posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 04:26 AM MDT | Updated: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 04:50 AM MDT

http://www.edmontonsun.com/2014/09/16/military-suicides-outnumbered-deaths-in-afghanistan-new-stats-show



MONTREAL — There were more suicides in the Canadian Forces since 2002 than combat deaths during Canada's Afghanistan mission, according to a report obtained by QMI Agency.

In the 12 years that Canadians fought in Afghanistan, 158 Armed Forces members were killed. According to records obtained from the Department of National Defence, there were 178 Canadian Forces suicides in the same period.

Due to standard military practice to issue only the numbers of suicides of full-time male soldiers — so the military can compare those statistics with the same age in the general population — previous numbers did not include female soldiers or reservists.

This has allowed the government to state that the suicide rate of a full-time male members of the Armed Forces is no different than that of the average Canadian from a similar demographic.

"I think the problem is much bigger than the numbers show," military lawyer and retired Col. Michel Drapeau said. "Many suicides occur after the person has left the Armed Forces and those numbers aren't included in the totals.

"Often, the ones who have just left the Forces are the most desperate."

Defence Minister Rob Nicholson has ensured the "Forces have taken great strides in recent years to make sure that more attention is being paid to mental health issues, whether they are deployment related or not," Ministry of National Defence spokesman Johanna Quinney told QMI Agency.

"We have augmented the military budget by $130 million, including an increase of $11.4 million for mental health initiatives, raising the total to $50 million. We now have 29 mental health clinics across the country."

The father-in-law of one young soldier who committed suicide says the military still needs to work on the basics.

Marc Tardif said if not for the Army's mistakes, his daughter-in-law, Anne Crevier, may still be alive today.

Crevier, 19, joined the forces in May 2011. On her final exercise of basic training, she was hit in the eye by a paintball. Crevier was wearing goggles, but not a full face mask.

The military transferred her for treatment to Valcartier in Quebec -- far from her family, friends and basic training mates.

"She was really left all on her own," Tardif said.

Crevier told Tardif that she was harassed while at Valcartier, and told that she was better suited to "work in an office."

Nine months after the paintball accident, Crevier committed suicide. "She lost all hope," Tardif said.

Two and a half years later, the family still waits for the results of the inquiry to Crevier's suicide.

-- ---- -----

Suicides in the Canadian Armed Forces (2004 to March 31 2014):

2014 (March 31) :

Male - regular forces: 5
Female - regular forces: 0
Male and female reserves: 3
Total: 8

2013

Male - regular forces: 9
Female - regular forces: 1
Male and female reserves: 3
Total: 13

2012

Male - regular forces: 10
Female - regular forces: 3
Male and female reserves: 4
Total: 17

2011

Male - regular forces: 21
Female - regular forces: 1
Male and female reserves: 3
Total: 25

2010

Male - regular forces: 12
Female - regular forces: 0
Male and female reserves: 1
Total: 13

2009

Male - regular forces: 12
Female - regular forces: 2
Male and female reserves: 8
Total: 22

2008

Male - regular forces: 13
Female - regular forces: 1
Male and female reserves: 1
Total: 15

2007

Male - regular forces: 9
Female - regular forces: 1
Male and female reserves: 2
Total: 12

2006

Male - regular forces: 7
Female - regular forces: 1
Male and female reserves: 3
Total: 11

2005

Male - regular forces: 10
Female - regular forces: 0
Male and female reserves: 1
Total: 11

2004

Male - regular forces: 10
Female - regular forces: 0
Male and female reserves: 3
Total: 13

-- Source - Department of National Defence
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DND struggles to fill mental health positions nine months after suicide crisis
« Reply #49 on: September 16, 2014, 07:02:59 PM »
DND struggles to fill mental health positions nine months after suicide crisis

CP  | By Murray Brewster, The Canadian Press
Posted: 09/16/2014 3:46 pm EDT Updated: 59 minutes ago

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/09/16/dnd-struggles-to-fill-men_n_5831516.html?utm_hp_ref=canada&ir=Canada

OTTAWA - Almost nine months after promising to make the hiring of mental health staff a priority for the Canadian Forces, 40 positions — nearly 10 per cent of the military's mental health workforce — remain vacant across the country, according to new figures released by National Defence.

The information comes as a series of emails show the military was scrambling prior to the last federal budget to avoid further cuts in its medical branch, all at a time when several soldiers took their own lives and some 35 others tried to do the same.

The pledge to meet a long-established benchmark of 454 psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and addiction counsellors — both civilian and military — was made at the height of a series of suicides last winter.

Thirty-two of the vacant positions are civil service jobs, which have proven the toughest to fill.

No one in the administration has been idle, Defence Minister Rob Nicholson insisted Tuesday during question period in the House of Commons.

"This has become a priority for this government," Nicholson said in response to a question about a published report showing there have been more military suicides since 2002 than there were combat casualties in Afghanistan.

"I've indicated we've increased our health care spending. We've increased the number of mental health care workers. And I can tell this House that, unlike under the previous administration, this will be a priority for this government."

But up until the recent series of suicides, there had seemed to be little sense of urgency.

A budgetary and bureaucratic turf war brought on by the Harper government's hiring freeze prevented the Canadian Forces Health Services from filling jobs, even though $11.4-million was injected into the system in 2012 to make it happen.

In testimony last spring before a Commons committee, one federal official said certain obstacles, such as a paltry relocation allowance, had been rectified and removed.

Since January, 54 mental health staff have been hired and officials said they were "proactively" searching to fill the rest.

But an email exchange between the military's chief of personnel and the department's deputy minister shows that, even in the midst of the suicide crisis, the military was being told to make budgetary room for the new hires.

"During our meeting last week, I mentioned the potential cuts to (Health Services) primary care, associated with our budget issues in (2014/15) and longer," Maj.-Gen. David Millar wrote on Jan. 12, 2014, in a memo obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act.

"It is important to note that cuts to primary care have a direct impact on (mental health) care as primary care provides the front end and the back end, with (mental health) care providing the specialist requirement.

"Therefore augmenting (mental health) care while decreasing primary care will be contrary to what we are trying to achieve."

National Defence was asked recently whether the last budget imposed any reductions to primary care or staff.

"There were no cuts made to the primary care program budget as it would have had too great of an impact on the health care of (Canadian Armed Forces) members," the department responded in an email.

"The military health care program continues to be adequately funded by DND through a combination of baseline funding and, when required, in-year funding adjustments."

Also despite the government's assurances, wait times for initial assessments at Operational Trauma and Stress Support Centres have been creeping up at four of the seven clinics across the country.

For example, at Valcartier, Que., the wait for routine, non-urgent assessments sat at 102 days in July, up from an average of 43 days in the spring. It's almost as bad in Petawawa, Ont., where the wait is 78 days.

Only in Esquimalt, B.C., Gagetown, N.B., and Halifax have the wait times declined.

Cases are supposed to seen within 28 days. Officials said urgent cases are dealt with quickly, sometimes as "soon as the same day."

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PTSD linked to soldier's 3 suicide attempts, family says
« Reply #50 on: October 24, 2014, 09:18:47 PM »
PTSD linked to soldier's 3 suicide attempts, family says

'I do not want my son to become a statistic, but that's what's happening'

CBC News Posted: Oct 24, 2014 9:05 PM AT Last Updated: Oct 24, 2014 9:05 PM AT

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/ptsd-linked-to-soldier-s-3-suicide-attempts-family-says-1.2812791



The family of a soldier from Halifax is afraid for his life as he struggles with what he believes to be an undiagnosed case of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Kim and Steven Dixon say their son, Cpl. Thomas Dixon, has tried to kill himself three times since June. Most recently, he tried to end his life in an Edmonton military jail.

“My son, he was always army. Growing up [in the] cadets, he loved it,” Kim Dixon said. “Then he went over to Afghanistan. That's when things turned around for him.”

Dixon's parents saw the change in their son almost immediately when he came home.

“He came back, he was very moody, he had a temper — all the signs you would see of people who have PTSD,” she said.
Married, with four children

He was assessed for post-traumatic stress disorder, but never diagnosed.

Dixon is married with four children.

He told his mom stories about how Afghanistan changed his life

“He was telling me he was over there and he went jogging and the Taliban was shooting at him he had to stay in the sand for at least an hour before someone came to pick him up,” she said.

Dixon's trouble with the military justice system started this past summer. He attempted suicide by cutting his wrists

His parents say he begged for help, but didn't get it.

“Tom got up and walked onto the middle of Gottingen Street, heading for the bridge to jump. They charged him for that,” she said.

Dixon was convicted of four charges in a summary trial: two counts of insubordination for swearing at an officer, and for lifting his fists to the same officer. He was absent without leave and caused a disturbance.

He was sent to Canada's only military prison, in Edmonton, for 21 days

Days after starting his sentence, Dixon tried again to end his life.

“He tried to hang himself with a t-shirt,” his mother said. “He's crying out for help and nobody's there. I do not want my son to become a statistic, but that's what's happening.”

CBC News asked the Department of National Defence for a comment about Dixon's situation, but no one returned our calls.
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Canadian military claim that its suicide rates are lower is not true, says expert

Suicide among serving Canadian military and veterans is at epidemic proportions and the leading cause of death in the armed forces, an internationally renowned “suicidologist” told a coalition of veterans in Ottawa.

More from the report by my Ottawa Citizen colleague Chris Cobb:

Dr. Antoon Leenaars, a Canadian psychologist, dismissed the often-repeated claim by Canada’s military and political leaders that suicide rates in the military are lower than in the general population.

“I don’t think that’s true,” he told the Citizen after his speech. “It seems to me it’s whitewashing. People believe what they prefer to be true — the military believes what they prefer to be true.

“There is no question that it is at epidemic proportions,” he added. “Why would there be so many soldiers in the U.S. dying by suicide and not in Canada? (The Canadian military’s) answer is that it’s because of excellent care and excellent leadership but are the Americans so poor that they are not providing adequate care and leadership?”

Full article here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/military-suicides-an-epidemic-says-canadian-expert


Source: Canadian military claim that its suicide rates are lower is not true, says expert
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Disparition brutale d’un ancien militaire de Valcartier
« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2014, 02:21:43 PM »
Disparition brutale d’un ancien militaire de Valcartier

Troisième présumé suicide en moins d'un mois
Ajouté par Jacques N. Godbout le 8 septembre 2014   13:51.
Enregistré sous Divers
Tags: Claude Émond, suicides, suicides FC, Sylvie Duchesne, Valcartier

http://www.45enord.ca/2014/09/disparition-brutale-dun-ancien-militaire-de-valcartier/



Un ancien militaire de Valcartier qui s’est enlevé la vie la semaine dernière aurait été laissé à lui-même par les Forces armées canadiennes après un déploiement en Afghanistan qui l’a laissé profondément marqué, selon sa veuve qui a accordé une entrevue au FM93.

Le sergent (ret.) Claude Émond, 49 ans, qui était le visage des techniciens en réfrigération et mécanique, s’est enlevé la vie la semaine dernière alors que sa conjointe et son fils étaient avec lui.

Il sera possible de rendre hommage au sergent Émond le 11 septembre à 16h au Complexe funéraire Sylvio Marceau, à Québec.

Sylvie Duchesne a décrit sur les ondes de Cogeco Nouvelles le profond malaise que vivait le sergent Émond depuis son retour de l’Afghanistan.

La veuve a ajouté que le soutien offert à M. Émond s’est limité aux services d’un psychologue et de la médication, ce qui ne l’a pas empêché de s’enfoncer dans une dangereuse détresse.

En près d’un an, ce suicide porte à sept le nombre de militaires ou ex militaires de la base de Valcartier qui sont décédés, cinq étant des présumés suicides, deux des morts naturelles.

Rappelons qu’il existe de nombreux services tant du côté militaire que du côté civil qui permet d’être «à l’écoute», tels que le 1 866 277-3553 du Centre de prévention de suicide du Québec, les différents programmes du Service de santé mentale des Forces armées canadiennes, la branche locale de votre Légion royale canadienne ou bien encore, à défaut, parler à quelqu’un de confiance fait toujours du bien!

Chimo!

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Family of dead Shilo soldier issues statement
« Reply #53 on: January 28, 2015, 11:39:44 PM »
Family of dead Shilo soldier issues statement

By: The Canadian Press

Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 at 10:19 AM

http://www.brandonsun.com/breaking-news/Family-of-dead-Shilo-soldier-issues-statement-290075301.html?thx=y

SHILO, Man. — A Manitoba-based soldier who served in Afghanistan has died.

Media reports say the body of Sgt. Jesse Tait, who was 34, was recovered from a river near Thunder Bay, Ont.

Tait was a member of 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

A spokeswoman for Canadian Forces Base Shilo near Brandon, Man., confirmed Tait’s death but declined to provide any details.

Tait joined the military in January 2002 and served in Bosnia in 2003 and in Afghanistan in 2008.
Friends say he is survived by a wife and two young sons.

"Jesse was a wonderful father, husband, son, and soldier," said a statement from his family released by the Canadian Army Tuesday.

"He was a proud Patricia and loved what he did. Our families are grieving and we ask you to respect our privacy at this time."

People from across Canada posted tributes to Tait on social media, noting his skills as a soldier and as a bagpiper.

One friend noted that Tait played bagpipes at funeral services for other soldiers.

"RIP Sgt. Jesse Tait. Our sincere sympathy to your family," wrote Janice McDonald.

"Had the pleasure of meeting Jesse in November (at) 2PPCLI in Shilo & he played Amazing Grace at my father’s funeral as 2PPCLI formed an honour guard.

"Thank you for your service, so honoured to have got to know you."
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