Author Topic: Your letters for Saturday July 16: The Tenors, Pride and Trudeau abroad  (Read 545 times)

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Your letters for Saturday July 16: The Tenors, Pride and Trudeau abroad

No need to even sing the anthem at sporting events  Setting aside the fact that The Tenors are not the only ones who have changed the lyrics of O Canada for political reasons recently, one wonders why national anthems must be sung at events such as the MLB All-Star Game at all. The two teams […]

No need to even sing the anthem at sporting events 


Setting aside the fact that The Tenors are not the only ones who have changed the lyrics of O Canada for political reasons recently, one wonders why national anthems must be sung at events such as the MLB All-Star Game at all. The two teams involved were playing for their respective baseball leagues (and indirectly, for their home cities) but they certainly weren’t representing their countries.


Closer to home, singing our national anthem before a Redblacks game is ludicrous: Our excellent football team is playing for the city of Ottawa and its competitor is playing for some other Canadian city (or perhaps a province in the case of the Lions and the Roughriders); neither of them is playing for the country of Canada, and in fact most of the players are not even Canadian.


Compelling a stadium full of spectators to stand and sing the national anthem before a game distorts the meaning and diminishes the significance of that anthem, and it is a custom that should be reserved for sports events in which the athletes concerned are officially representing the countries whose anthems are being sung.


Robin Farquhar, Ottawa


A heartening sign for Canadian nationalism


The uproar (in Canada anyway) over Remigio Pereira’s changing of the Canadian national anthem at a Major League Baseball’s All-Star game in San Diego reveals that Canadians really do care about their national symbols. Any country’s national anthem is a musical and lyrical constitution of sorts and tampering with it is akin to flag burning. It’s visual.


The Americans would never in a million years stand for someone tampering with their national anthem, so at least this anthem flap does reveal that Canadians actually do care about their nationalism. Our national anthem (and it should be sung in more venues than just at sporting events) is our Canadian spirit and quiet true strength expressed through the vehicle of a stirring and heartfelt expressive song. Don’t mess with Canada. Anthems matter.


Douglas Cornish, Ottawa


Trudeau’s right to take his family along on trips 


What is wrong with us Canadians? Justin Trudeau takes his son to an international conference, his family to his first meeting with the president of the United States. His wife, the mother of three young children, requests some additional help, and we start quibbling.


Ah the poor taxpayers. Who do we think foots the bill of the travel of the leaders, and family, of other G7 countries? The First Lady of the United States has a staff, we quibble because Sophie Grégoire Trudeau said she could do with one more person to help her.


I do believe that we need to support our First Family with more understanding and respect and financial support. We are either part of the top countries in the world or we are not. What a wonderful opportunity for Xavier to spend some time with his Dad and also learn some very important history. Let’s accept that this prime minister spends a great deal of time away from his young family, so if he has an opportunity to take one of these youngsters to accompany him, I say do it. I do not mind if one of my tax dollars helps us act like citizens of the world.


Barbara Campbell, Brockville


Care and attention to family 


Why cannot our busy prime minister travel with his son, who Justin Trudeau is away from so much? I say, bravo, Justin for the care and attention you give your young family.


Diana Robertson, Fitzroy Harbour


Leave the kids at home to enjoy their summer 


I sit wondering why Justin Trudeau felt it was necessary to take his son on his latest trip to the Baltic States and Ukraine. This was a very important trip for Canada’s military, not a sightseeing visit for his son. What really upset me as a former military member was his son tagging along while the prime minister inspected the troops in Ukraine. I can only imagine what was going through the minds of those on parade as a child reviewed them.


Leave the little boy at home to enjoy his summer with friends. Surely his father can go away on business for a while alone. Many dads do.


Don Jessome, Richmond


Veterans are more than just window dressing

Re: Smol: A familiar patter of ignoring veterans, July 11


Thank you Robert Smol for laying out the groundwork for what Canada’s veterans need to do in order to improve our benefits.


Unfortunately, I feel that your sound assessment and advice will go unheeded as veterans are too fractured, with not only different levels of veteran’s care already being provided by the government, but also with too many special interest veteran’s groups vying for their membership.


It also appears that there are too many people who have a career or position based on maintaining the status-quo. Perhaps more importantly, actively protesting is not what Canadian veterans usually do. There have been a few brave individuals who have challenged the system and we have seen from both the government and media scrutiny what they have had to endure in order to bring about change.


During our military careers we were trained to take direction, follow orders and that openly questioning those in power, especially by uniting with others, could be tantamount to mutiny. Only by realizing that the government does have a sacred obligation to look after veterans and that we do need to demonstrate en masse to those in power and that we are more than just window dressing at public events, will anyone in government sit up, take notice and make some changes.


Ed Storey

RCE WO, Retired

UN Yugoslavia, NATO Bosnia and Afghanistan Veteran

Nepean


Right choice to let police march in Pride parade

Re: Capital Pride has no plan to exclude police, July 15


Capital Pride is taking a very sensible position on the matter of police presence at Ottawa’s festival next month. Like all institutions and indeed individuals, the police can always “do better” in regards to inclusion and sensitivity to the lived experience of injustice and discrimination. So, by all means, let’s be open to discussion of the discomfort a police presence may cause for some segments of the LGBTQ+ community, and of accommodations that may be needed.


As that discussion takes place here in Ottawa, I’ll be among those advocating a continued welcome for an official and uniformed police presence at the Pride parade. The institution of law enforcement has travelled a remarkable distance in its relationship with the community in recent decades, including welcoming many LGBTQ+ people within its ranks. Is there still a further path to travel towards full inclusion? No doubt. But on August 21 on Bank Street, let’s welcome everyone to march who’s shown a commitment to come along for the journey so far.


Kevin Hanson, Ottawa


Source: Your letters for Saturday July 16: The Tenors, Pride and Trudeau abroad