Author Topic: Should exceptions be made in Agent Orange compensation rules?  (Read 1447 times)

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Should exceptions be made in Agent Orange compensation rules?

GO VOTE: http://www.cbc.ca/news/yourcommunity/2011/12/should-exceptions-be-made-in-agent-orange-compensation-rules.html

    * December 19, 2011 10:07 AM | Read 21
    * By Community Team


Grant Pye said he has two diseases related to his Agent Orange exposure, but Veterans Affairs denied his application because his family's summer home near the base wasn't his 'residence.' (CBC)

People suffering health effects from Agent Orange testing at a Canadian Forces Base in New Brunswick in the 1960s say they're being denied financial compensation due to technicalities.

Grant Pye said he has two diseases related to his Agent Orange exposure, but Veterans Affairs denied his application because his family's summer home near the base wasn't his 'residence.'Grant Pye said he has two diseases related to his Agent Orange exposure, but Veterans Affairs denied his application because his family's summer home near the base wasn't his 'residence.' (CBC)The federal government has promised $20,000 to anyone who suffered ill health effects linked to the American chemical tests at CFB Gagetown in 1966 and 1967. In order to receive compensation, claimants had to be diagnosed by June 30, 2011.

Debbie Bertrand, who has lung cancer, says her claim was denied because she missed the deadline. Though she felt quite ill, she didn't go to a doctor, she said.

Grant Pye, whose family spent summers at a vacation property near the base, said he suffers from two diseases linked to Agent Orange exposure. Veterans Affairs denied his claim, however, because the summer home was not his "residence."

Pye's MP, Conservative John Williamson, wrote a scathing letter to Veterans Affairs about the denial calling it "arbitrary and discriminating."

"An injustice has occurred," wrote Williamson. "Your office has chosen to ignore the clear intent of the program ... I ask that you right this wrong in the interest of fairness and justice."

Veterans Affairs has said that most of the $114-million fund has now been depleted. The remaining $9 million will be used to pay claims, with the last cheques sent out by Dec. 30.

Should Veterans Affairs make exceptions in Bertrand's and Pye's cases? Should the compensation fund be increased to cover more people? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Should exceptions be made in Agent Orange compensation rules?


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