Author Topic: VA Privacy: Internal Review Absolved Bureaucrats Over Medical Info Leaks  (Read 1523 times)

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Veterans Affairs Privacy: Internal Review Absolved Bureaucrats Over Medical Info Leaks

CP  |  By Murray Brewster, The Canadian Press Posted: 05/27/2012 4:30 am Updated: 05/27/2012 12:27 pm

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/05/27/veterans-affair-privacy-review_n_1548580.html?ref=canada-politics


An independent investigator who reviewed privacy violations at Veterans Affairs Canada told the Harper government in late 2010 it was appropriate to include the personal medical information of an outspoken advocate in briefing material, say internal federal documents. (AP)

OTTAWA - An independent investigator who reviewed privacy violations at Veterans Affairs Canada told the Harper government in late 2010 it was appropriate to include the personal medical information of an outspoken advocate in briefing material, say internal federal documents.

The central finding of the Amprax Inc. review flies in the face of the country's privacy watchdog, who concluded almost two years ago that two briefing notes sprinkled with the references to well-known critic Sean Bruyea's psychiatric reports broke the law.

The report was prepared for former veterans minister Jean-Pierre Blackburn at the insistence of bureaucrats who were the target of Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart's scathing critique of the case.

The review, which cost taxpayers $24,990, didn't find "any malice" or "fault" in the actions of bureaucrats and senior department officials.

"The Minister had the right to obtain the information provided in the two notes," said the review, part of a briefing package dated Dec. 21, 2010.

"The Minister also had a need for that information. The Minister had a need for that information at those very moments. It is debatable whether he needed all of it. Most people believe he did."

The records, requested by The Canadian Press 18 months ago, were released last week under access to information laws following a complaint to the country's information commissioner.