Author Topic: Warning Order. Fynes Public Interest Hearing - MP Complaints Commission  (Read 3321 times)

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Canadian_Vet

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Warning order. Fynes Public Interest Hearing - MPCC

I have spoken to Mrs Sheila Fynes in reference to the Hearing that will be conducted in Ottawa on March 27th, 2012 into the circumstances surrounding her son's tragic death. Let me state for the record that the Canadian Veterans Advocacy has no agenda other that offering full compassionate support to the Fynes, their quest for justice and ultimately, a sense of closure. On a personal level, I have been deeply affected by our conversation -very emotional- and am DETERMINED to ensure this proud and courageous woman has the proper support element when she is in Ottawa. The hearing is TWELVE WEEKS in length and due to the distance between Niagara and the costs of travel and accommodations...

We will need your help. Their will be times when Mrs Fynes will be alone due to the travel and the travel restrictions imposed. I feel that the presence of veterans compassionate to her cause and fretful that such a tragedy could very well occur again if an honest, transparent hearing does not occur, will offer her family reassurance when she is in Ottawa alone and confronting what will undoubtedly be a very traumatic period in her life.

I am appealing to your heart. Can you help us provide a support line? Would you consider sitting beside her when I am not able to be in Ottawa? Wopuld you consider offering me a place to sleep to defer expenses? I will be traveling up to Ottawa Monday to ensure that I am on site for Tuesday and will do my best to be there as often as i am able but... What left over from my pension only goes so far and being disabled, couch hopping is not an option.

These are the type of Canadian Veterans Advocacy pro-active humanitarian operations your donations are sponsoring. Unfortunately, due to two unexpected trips to Ottawa on the budget front and the monthly payment for our insurance, the CVA account is taking a beating. Be advised, I/we pay our own way re food and sleep cheap. Only transportation and accommodations are covered from the CVA warchest. Even still, the personal costs have not been insignificant over the past year and due to the intensity of the current schedule, to add the cost of logistics will surely affect our proactive ops and place a great deal of strain on our families.

The CVA team will be in Ottawa four days next week to support the Fynes and organize the vigil Thursday. We may have to return again to testify before parliamentary committee and attend the Vimy Day celebrations in early April, by then, we will paying out of our own pocket again. Once our ability to pay the way runs out, our ability to engage Ottawa effectively is reduced substantially. Or, in this case, sponsor efforts humanitarian support operations as with the Fynes.

If you support the our advocacy, if you want to make a difference but live to far away, help us. Make a donation into the war chest, even if it is only twenty bucks. In a little over a year, we have accomplished much, your voice has been heard. Yet we must recognize our quest has just begun, to engage at the level required requires a war chest capable of fighting not only for the brother/sister hood, but the families the fallen have left behind.


http://www.mpcc-cppm.gc.ca/300/303/index-eng.aspx
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Canadian_Vet

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Fynes Public Interest Hearing

Corporal (Cpl) Stuart Langridge committed suicide at Canadian Forces Base/Area Support Unit (CFB/ASU) Edmonton on March 15, 2008. He had served in Bosnia and Afghanistan. His parents, Shaun and Sheila Fynes, maintain that he was suffering from depression and post traumatic stress disorder at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Fynes have filed a complaint with the MPCC relating to three investigations conducted by the Canadian Forces National Investigations Service (CFNIS) following the death of their son.

In May 2011, the Commission began a Public Interest Investigation into the complaint and on September 6, 2011, the MPCC announced it would hold a Public Interest Hearing into the military police investigations relating to the death of Corporal Stuart Langridge.

The allegations in Mr. and Mrs. Fynes complaint include:

    * The CFNIS did not conduct independent investigations into the matter;
    * The investigations they conducted were inadequate and biased;
    * The investigations were aimed at exonerating Canadian Forces (CF) members of any responsibility for their failure to prevent Cpl Langridge?s death and for the manner in which they were subsequently treated;
    * CFNIS failed to investigate important issues; and
    * CFNIS failed to disclose the existence of a suicide note from their son to the Fynes.

The Commission?s mandate is to investigate the conduct of the Military Police in this case. The Commission?s investigation will focus on the complainants? allegations, which include allegations that the police investigations lacked impartiality and independence and that the MP failed to provide sufficient and timely information to them.

Fynes Public Interest Hearing - Timeline http://www.mpcc-cppm.gc.ca/300/303/b-eng.aspx

Fynes Public Interest Hearing - Witness List http://www.mpcc-cppm.gc.ca/300/303/c-eng.aspx
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Canadian_Vet

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Audience d?int?r?t public Fynes

Le cpl Langridge s?est suicid? sur la base des Forces canadiennes/Unit? de soutien de secteur (BFC/USS) Edmonton le 15 mars 2008. Il avait servi en Bosnie et en Afghanistan. Ses parents, Shaun et Sheila Fynes, soutiennent qu?il souffrait de d?pression et du syndrome de stress post-traumatique lors de son d?c?s.

M. et Mme Fynes ont d?pos? une plainte officielle aupr?s de la Commission d?examen des plaintes concernant la police militaire relativement aux enqu?tes effectu?es par le Service national des enqu?tes des Forces canadiennes (SNEFC) suite ? la mort de leur fils.

En mai 2011, la Commission a ouvert une enqu?te d?int?r?t public au sujet de la plainte et le 6 septembre 2011, la Commission annon?ait qu?elle tiendrait une audience d?int?r?t public au sujet des enqu?tes de la police militaire se rapportant ? la mort du caporal Stuart Langridge.

Dans leur plainte, M. et Mme Fynes all?guent notamment ce qui suit :

    * le SNEFC n?a pas men? d?enqu?tes ind?pendantes dans cette affaire;
    * les enqu?tes effectu?es par le SNEFC ?taient inad?quates et partiales;
    * les enqu?tes visaient ? exon?rer des membres des Forces canadiennes (FC) de toute responsabilit? relativement ? leur d?faut d?intervenir pour pr?venir la mort du cpl Langridge et relativement ? la mani?re dont les plaignants ont ?t? trait?s par la suite;
    * le SNEFC a omis d?enqu?ter au sujet de questions importantes;
    * le SNEFC a omis de r?v?ler aux Fynes l?existence d?une note de suicide de leur fils.

Le mandat de la Commission est d?enqu?ter sur la conduite de la police militaire dans le cas pr?sent. L?enqu?te de la Commission se concentrera sur les all?gations des plaignants qui incluent des all?gations que la police a manqu? d'impartialit? et d'ind?pendance et que la PM ne leur a pas fourni, en temps voulu, des renseignements satisfaisants.

Audience d?int?r?t public Fynes - Chronologie http://www.mpcc-cppm.gc.ca/300/303/b-fra.aspx

Audience d?int?r?t public Fynes - Liste des t?moins http://www.mpcc-cppm.gc.ca/300/303/c-fra.aspx
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Canadian_Vet

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Aaron Michael Bedard
To properly appreciate Shawn and Shiela Fynes story involving there sons Suicide. it is addressed in the Julie jackson documentary War in the mind. I had visited with wayne dan tim the fynes and julie jackson last week and attended the Veterans Transitin Program last year so if theres any question about it just ask. its 56 min long and they are on 36th min then again in last ten minutes but you need to watch it in full.
here is the link:

http://ww3.tvo.org/program/137402/war-in-the-mind
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Canadian_Vet

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Tomorrow 9h00 - 27th march 2012

Military Police Complaints Commission
270 Albert Street, 10th Floor
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5G8
Telephone: (613) 947-5625
Telephone Toll Free: 1 800 632-0566
Fax: (613) 947-5713
Fax Toll Free: 1 877 947-5713
e-mail: commission@mpcc-cppm.gc.ca
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Family of dead Canadian soldier hopeful inquiry brings answers

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/Family+dead+Canadian+soldier+hopeful+inquiry+brings+answers/6362236/story.html#ixzz1qHP1Zg9T



By Robert Hiltz, Postmedia News March 26, 2012 5:02 PM

OTTAWA ? The family of a soldier found dead in his barracks in 2008 is relieved that a public interest inquiry into the circumstances of his death is going to begin Tuesday ? the day after what would have been his 34th birthday.

Sheila and Shaun Fynes said their biggest hope is that some good can come from the suicide of their son, Cpl. Stuart Langridge.

"We're not wallowing in self-pity," Shaun Fynes said. "We try and look for the positive in everything and this is a way to bring a positive from Stuart's death that something can be done to help others."

Both parents said they hope the hearings before the Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC) ? an independent, civilian-run investigative body ? will shed light on the factors that led to Langridge's death.

On March 15, 2008, Langridge was found hanging in his Edmonton barracks. A veteran of tours in Afghanistan and Bosnia, Langridge was diagnosed with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder and previously had attempted to take his own life on six separate occasions.

The family hopes the hearings will determine how their son was able to kill himself when he was under the care of military doctors.

Military police also withheld Langridge's suicide note from his family for almost 15 months.

"We're absolutely delighted that the Military Police Complaints Commission paid heed to us and took us seriously," Shaun Fynes said. "This is very personal to us. We're very serious about it."

"No family should never go through what we've gone through . . . to get answers," Sheila Fynes said. "It's been a long four years."

Sheila Fynes said the best outcome from the hearing would be if it prevented another soldier from taking their own life.

"I think I speak for all mothers when I do this. I'm hopeful. I'm hopeful there will be lessons learned," she said.

Though the experience has been tough on the family, they have received nothing but support from veterans and veterans groups. Sheila said several veterans were coming to Ottawa to support the family. Her husband added that none of the groups had a political agenda and they were simply showing support for the family of a veteran.

Despite their determination to see the process through, the family came close to being overwhelmed by the hearings when their lawyer had to withdraw his services because they couldn't afford to pay him.

However, Michel Drapeau learned March 16 his legal fees would be covered by the government, four days after he was forced to drop the case because he could no longer continue at the demanding case following months of pro-bono work.

"It was at the 11th hour ? we've been waiting since October," Shaun Fynes said. "We don't have the means to get involved in a public-interest hearing for two-and-a-half months with our limited resources. We were going to have to go it alone."

"As a matter of justice and fairness, it was absolutely essential that the Fynes be provided with funding," Drapeau said in an email. "To do otherwise would have meant that the 13 Military Police respondents as well as the Provost Marshall would have enjoyed this benefit while the Fynes would have been expected to fend for themselves."

Legal costs could run as high as $200,000 due to the complex nature of the hearing, involving thousands of pages of evidence and testimony.

Drapeau expressed his disappointment at the amount of time it took for the government to agree to cover the legal expenses for the couple since the MPCC first recommended the government pay their bills.

"The fact that it took five months to authorize such funding added unnecessary stress and anxiety to these grieving parents," he said.

The commission first recommended the government pay for the Fynes' legal costs in October after hearing that both Shaun and Sheila are retired and would not have been able to afford the costs because of their fixed income.

The hearing is expected to take two and a half months, at the end of which the commission is expected to issue recommendations based on its findings.

rhiltz@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/robert_hiltz
? Copyright (c) Postmedia News
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Canadian_Vet

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?A stretch? to say PTSD caused soldier to kill himself, military inquiry hears
 
By Chris Cobb, The Ottawa Citizen

March 27, 2012 5:43 PM

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/stretch+PTSD+caused+soldier+kill+himself+military+inquiry+hears/6368163/story.html#ixzz1qMBy1Wm1



OTTAWA ? Despite the experience of an increasing number of suicides among returning Afghanistan war veterans, the Canadian Forces failed to prevent the death of a suicidal army corporal who had attempted five times to kill himself, a military inquiry was told Tuesday.

In only the third case in its 13-year history, the Military Police Complaints Commission began an inquiry into the March 15, 2008, death of Cpl. Stuart Langridge, who had served in Bosnia and had been part of a high-risk reconnaissance unit in the mountains around Kabul in Afghanistan.

Langridge, whose body was allegedly left hanging and uncovered for four hours while CFB Edmonton?s military police conducted their initial investigation, was buried on his 28th birthday.

According to Langridge?s family, their son left a suicide note addressed to his family that military police kept from them for more than a year, and that included a request that he not have ?any kind of fancy funeral ? just family.?

DND held a full military funeral for Langridge.

There have been three separate military police investigations into the corporal?s death, all of which his family claims were biased and incompetent.

A subsequent military inquiry consisted of a panel of one military engineer and two infantry lieutenants who, said family lawyer Michel Drapeau, were not qualified to rule on a medical case.

?Inexplicably, the military board of inquiry refused to acknowledge that Stuart was suffering from an acute form of PTSD,? said Drapeau. ?Instead it fixated on blaming Stuart?s suicide on the divorce of his parents, and the subsequent estrangement of his father when Stuart was five years old.?

Langridge?s family had to use the Access to Information Act to get a copy of the panel?s report, and still hasn?t officially received one from the Department of National Defence (DND).

The soldier?s mother and stepfather, Sheila and Shaun Fynes, have launched more than 30 allegations against 13 military police officers.

The case is about a soldier?s suicide and the treatment of his family after the death, his mother told the Citizen outside the hearing.

She claims that the military brushed her and her husband aside and instead appointed Stuart?s estranged girlfriend as official next of kin.

?We have confidence that this is going to be a transparent hearing and result in some changes so that soldiers who are unwell will get the appropriate treatment in a timely manner,? she said.

DND has deliberately kept Stuart?s immediate family at a distance, she added.

?But the more you push us away the closer we get,? she said. ?There is some accountability that needs to be brought to light here and it was easier for us to be left out of the equation to avoid some of that responsibility.?

Lawyer Drapeau told the inquiry that Stuart Langridge was ?a quiet, loyal and caring soul.

?He was first and foremost a veteran ? a soldier who served his country with distinction with front-line experience in Bosnia and Afghanistan,? said Drapeau. ?And this, you believe, has to count for something.?

At the time of his death, Langridge was addicted to drugs and alcohol ? an addiction the military says was the root cause of his problem, not a condition brought about by any trauma he experienced overseas.

?Like most of us,? added Drapeau, ?he was not perfect and he had some scars and warts. The year before his death Stuart had an alcohol and drug problem which, we believe, he acquired to ease his depression.

?He would not talk about his experiences in Kabul,? said the lawyer. ?He began to suffer from nightmares, night terrors and night sweats ? he seemed to be isolating himself, to shun relationships and to seek only the company of his former Afghanistan crew mates.?

Ten days before his death, Langridge had left hospital after 30 days? psychiatric treatment and was sent back to CFB Edmonton.

Two days later, homeless after a fight with his common-law wife and living in his truck, Langridge asked base surgeon Major Richard Hannah to be returned to Albert Hospital, but its psychiatric unit was full.

Instead, he was given a temporary bed at his unit, Lord Strathcona Horse (Royal Canadians) and was placed under what Drapeau characterized as a ?suicide watch.?

When he hanged himself, Langridge had traces of cocaine in his system.

Hannah, the only witness Tuesday, insisted that Langridge was not under a suicide watch with the Strathconas, and that the military had done everything possible to help Langridge and had offered him the best medical care.

The corporal?s fundamental problem was drug and alcohol addiction, said Hannah.

?Cocaine is a terrible drug and causes terrible harm,? he said. ?Cocaine can cause people to commit suicide.?

Three separate psychiatric reports indicated no evidence of PTSD, said Hanna, adding that it was ?a stretch? to say PTSD caused Langridge to kill himself.

?I busted my butt to take care of Cpl. Langridge,? he added. ?He was a troubled young man who had many problems.?

After Langridge died, Hannah said he re-visited the intervention the armed force?s medical system provided.

?I wanted to know whether we had dropped the ball,? said Hannah. ?If I made a mistake I wanted to know. I didn?t want Cpl. Lang to die. That was the last thing I wanted to happen. If I had made a mistake, I would have put my hands up and admitted it.?

The hearing continues next week.
? Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
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Soldier's parents hope inquiry answers suicide questions
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2012, 10:56:57 PM »
Soldier's parents hope inquiry answers suicide questions

Video: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120327/stuart-langbridge-parents-public-hearing-120327/

CTVNews.ca Staff

Date: Tue. Mar. 27 2012 8:21 AM ET



The parents of a Canadian soldier who committed suicide hope to finally get the answers they have been seeking for four years, with the start of a public hearing Tuesday into their son's death.

Cpl. Stuart Langridge hanged himself on March 2008 in the barracks at CFB Edmonton where he was stationed.

The 29-year-old had served on tours in Bosnia and Afghanistan and was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder when he died.

He had also been struggling with alcohol and substance abuse since his return from a six-month tour in Afghanistan in 2005, and his family later learned he had attempted suicide on six previous occasions.

Why that information was kept from them, and why it wasn't until months after his death that the military handed over the suicide note Langridge had left, are some of the questions Shaun and Sheila Fynes hope to have answered at the Public Interest Hearing being held at the Military Police Complaints Commission in Ottawa.

"Our son was in the military, he became ill, he was cared for by the military community and he died as a result of his service, we honestly believe," Sheila told CTV's Canada AM on Tuesday.

"And I think there are some steps along the way that could have been done differently but hopefully the commission is going to do a really good job here, we're really hopeful."

Though the Canadian Forces National Investigations Service carried out an earlier probe into his death, his parents believe the aim was to exonerate the military of any responsibility, rather than uncover what went wrong.

They hope that will be different this time around.

"We've just tried desperately to find the truth and we're very relieved and very pleased that the Military Police Complaints Commission listened and acted on our complaint," Shaun said. "We look forward to clearing our son's name and hopefully helping other soldiers so they don't end up in the same position."

Shortly before Langridge succeeded in killing himself, he checked himself into a psychiatric facility at a local hospital in Alberta.

His parents said he was responding well to treatment and asked to stay in the facility until he could be transferred to a facility in Ontario, but the request was denied.

He was discharged, and killed himself within two weeks.

That prompted the Fynes to hold a parliamentary news conference last fall, which was quickly followed by an apology from Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Walt Natynczyk.

The family fought for and eventually received the Memorial Cross and Sacrifice Medal for their son. He was also included in the Seventh Book of Remembrance.

In addition to learning more about how their son's illness and death was handled, the couple hopes their efforts will result in better treatment for other soldiers facing similar challenges.

"Hopefully along the way, even if we save the life of one soldier then this will all have been worth it and Stuart will not have died in vain," Sheila said.

The hearing is expected to last 10 to 12 weeks, and Sheila plans to attend every day. The Fynes will be represented by retired Col. Michel Drapeau.
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